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Remembered Today:

Hampshire Regiment


Marc Thompson

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Marc,

Just to let you know that I found Dead Man Farm for Martin.

I have informed him in a different thread, and will send a scan to him soon.

Aurel

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Pte 13812 F. J. VELLENDER was killed in action during the Battle of Doiran on 24th April 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial in Greece. I can provide further details of the 12th Hants movements during this battle if interested.

Marc

Marc

Many many thanks for the info you posted for me. I would be very grateful for details of the 12th Hants movements during the Battle of Dorian and, if you have time, any other actions they may have been involved in.

Cheers

Clare

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Marc Thompson
Stanley Bacon was a Private in the Hampshire Regiment (14th battalion), originally he was in the Essex Regiment, having enlisted in Chelmsford. He died of wounds received, during the final phases of the battles for the Somme and is buried in the Contay British Cemetery, Contay.

John,

Pte 26494 Stanley BACON, 14th (Service) Battalion (1st Portsmouth Pals)Hampshire Regiment was entitled to a pair (British War & Victory Medals) and originally served as Pte 28592, 1st Essex Regiment. As you indicate he enlisted in Chelmsford, Essex and was born and resident in Stock, Essex.

Unfortunately, the War Diary at both battalion and brigade level are poor in terms of the detail they contain and shed very little light on the number of casualties incurred during the period prior to when Pte Bacon died of wounds on 12th November 1916.

The battalions movements from October onwards:

Englebelmer (6/10)

Y Ravine Sector (10/10)

Englebekmer Wood (16/10)

Relieved 12th Royal Sussex at Schwaben Redoubt (17/10). Here conditions of the worst kind - the wet, cold, mud and shortage of food, according to the Hampshire Regimental history, being more unbearable than the enemy's constant shelling and counter attacks. Cut off from their support, the battalion made good use of the enemy's belongings - rations and clothing being taken from the dead, positions improved with German spades and his bombs and ammunition turned against him. Relieved by 17th K.R.R.C. (20/10) and to Pioneer Road - 'D' Company remaining in the line. 'D' Company in action against German attack (21/10). Not far short of 300 casualties all told were incurred by the Hampshire's from the time of their first occupying the Schwaben Redoubt.

Rest of Battalion moved forward to Wood Post in support. To Senlis Camp (23/10).

Thiepval (25/10)

Pioneer Road (27/10)

Thiepval River section (30/10)

Pioneer Road (1/11)

Senlis Camp (6/11)

Schwaben (10/11)

Thiepval (12/11)

Total casualties since action at Schwaben Redoubt from 17/10 to 21/10 numbered approximately 20 OR wounded or killed.

Marc

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Marc Thompson
Do you have any details for the 1/4 TF battalion during first six months of 1918?

I am trying to establish reason for 241499 Pte W Smith dying of wounds in May of that year, and a general overview of the Battalion's movements.

The summary of 1/4th movements from July 1917 to June 1918 is detailed below.

To give some idea of the distance covered by 1/4th Hants in the Mesopotamia and Persian campaigns which stretched from 1915 almost to the end of 1919 is the marching record held by Lance Corporal Bawden, "A" Company, 1/4th Hants who marched every inch from Basrah to within 40 miles of Tabriz (which is to the east of Lake Urmia in Azerbaijan).... about 1,000 miles.

12th July, 1917 - commenced trek to Baquba. Hottest day of abnormally hot year; official shade temperature in Baghdad, taken in probably coolest place in country, was 126°. Six men died and 35 taken to hospital with heat stroke.

14th July, 1917 - arrived Baquba and camped near Buhriz, close to Diala River. Remained in this camp until end of summer, mostly engaged in digging ' the Baquba defences, which formed right flank or continuation of SindiahWindiah line.

15th October, 1917 - left Baquba, and after very hot and trying march, reach Abu-Jisrah.

16th October, 1917 - marched to Shahraban, where 36th Brigade was assembling.

18th-21st October, 1917 - took part in operations which drove Turks from Jebel-Hamrin. No casualties. At close of operations went into camp at Tel-Ibarah. Drafts had been received at Baghdad (two), Baquba, and now at Tel-Ibarah.

3oth November, 1917 - Battalion, less three officers and 100 men of "B" Company-left for Ruz, and a few days later were in reserve at Kurdarrah for operations which drove Turks across Diala, near Qizil-Rabat. The detachment of "B" Company remained at Tel-Ibarah to guard the Ruz River bridgehead there, and eventually received the Russian detachment, under Colonel Bicherakoff, who camped there en route to Shahraban. After operations near Qizil-Rabat, remainder of "B" Company and "C" Company camped at Kurdarrah, "A" and "D" Companies, with Battalion Headquarters, moving to Khanikin.

13th December, 1917 - detachment at Tel-Ibarah joined up at Kurdarrah.

23rd December, 1917 - "B" and "C" Companies moved to Merjana, near Qizil-Rabat, and spent Christmas 1917, there.

31st December, 1917 - "B" and "C" Companies marched to Khanikin.

2nd January 1918 - Matthew's Column starts for Persia.

4th January, 1918 - reached Pai-Tak the great pass to Persian uplands.

Returned from Pal-Tak 7th January 1918, and reached Qasr-i-Shirin 10th January, 1918, (on the border).

20th January, 1918 - started back to Pai-Tak.

23rd January, 1918 - distribution "A," "B" and Headquarters at Surkhad-iza-Khan (on top of pass, 4,200 feet), "C" at Pai-Tak (foot of pass), "D" at Sar-i-Pul (ten miles nearer Baghdad).

24th January, 1918 - Major-General Dunsterville ("Stalky") and first party of his Force (Hush-hush Army), came through; second week in March, 1 platoon (J. De C. Hamilton) to Karind. This marked beginning of split-up of Battalion.

19th March, 1918 - 1 platoon to Kermanshah, at disposal of " Dunsterforce," and straight on to Hamadan. Then 1 platoon 200 miles from Battalion Headquarters, and C.O. had no knowledge of its whereabouts. Platoon commander sent letter to Heaquarters by aeroplane, but though letter reached Baghdad in five hours it took a further three weeks to reach C.O.

Epitome of Work in Persia:

January 1918 - Expedition to Pai-Tak and return to Qasr-i-shirin, with object of meeting and escorting to latter place H.B.M.'s Consul at Kermanshah, and his wife, with one section of Anzac Wireless Squadron, which had gone up with Russian Forces.

January to June 1918 - Guarding road, picketing pass, etc., for Dunsterville and his subsequent parties. Much trouble in May with marauding Kurds and rifle thieves.

Marc

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Thanks Marc, it's very useful stuff.

I will send Portsmouth details tomorrow (Fri)

Cheers

Richard

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  • 1 month later...

Dear Marc,

I spotted this thread whilst doing a search on the Hampshires. If you are still doing look-ups on the regimental war diaries etc, I'd be grateful if you could check for the following:

Lt H. Brown 2/4th Hampshires

He transferred to the regiment on 9th July 1918 from the 5th Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment.

I am keen to find out what his service number was, and whether it remained the same for both regiments, but primarily more details on him, as he was the Platoon commander for my Gt Grandfather whilst in the west Riding Regiment and I want to track down his service record or any papers related to him/by him in order to find out what company he was in whilst in the West Riding Regiment. Anyhow, If you have any information regarding him, I would be grateful.

Regards

doogal

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Marc.

Would it be at all possible for you to either post here or email me a scan of the actual page(s) in the Regimental history that covers the 1st Bn for 6th July 1915?

Thanks,

Dave.

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Lt H. Brown 2/4th Hampshires

He transferred to the regiment on 9th July 1918 from the 5th Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment.

I am keen to find out what his service number was, and whether it remained the same for both regiments,

Doogal.

You won't find his service number. Officers didn't have them then!!!

Dave.

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QUEW Pte William James Donald 5509814 Hampshire Regt. Listed as being at Magdalen Hill, died 26/12/1942. Could anyone give me any more information about William

Not a great deal of info, but a little more....he was born and enlisted at Portsmouth.

Dave.

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:) Thanx Dave, I have found out since my first post that Pte William James Donald Quew 5509814 Hampshire Regt; was the son of William Henry Quew who married Minnie Ada Boyle and that William died from a fractured skull as a result of having been run over by an army lorry on Boxing Day 1942 :(. Quew is an uncommon surname and all the Quew's in the Uk are related to my family through my maternal Grandmother Louisa Ann who originated from Portsmouth.
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Would it be at all possible for you to either post here or email me a scan of the actual page(s) in the Regimental history that covers the 1st Bn for 6th July 1915?

Dave,

If you would like to send me your e-mail address off forum then I will send you a scan of the page required as an attachment.

Marc

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Email address sent via PM.

Thanks for this, Marc.

Dave.

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  • 1 month later...

Marc

I would be obliged if you could advise what if anything this Regimental history notes with regards to the activities of the 1st battalion on & around the 22nd April 1918.

Regards Will

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Will,

On April 22nd 1918 the 1st Hampshire's and the Rifle Brigade were involved in the capture of Pacaut Wood.

There are three pages in the regimental history that cover this attack.

If you can send me your e-mail address off forum then I will scan and send these pages to you.

Regards

Marc

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Hello Marc

Do you have any information on the following soldier:

Private 39450 John MATTHEWS, 2/7th Bn. Hampshire Regt.

I have a picture of him, taken in Mespot., if you're interested for your records? I can e-mail this to you. In the picture he is wearing four service chevrons indicating overseas service from sometime in 1915. Whilst the 2/7th Bn. left Southampton on 13 December 1914, they did not arrive in Bombay until 4 January 1915. If he was with the 2/7th from the outset (can you tell anything from his service number?), I'm not sure whether this would qualify him for the "1914" red chevron?

Kind rgds

Ed

PS I should add that the above is my great-grandfather!

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Ed,

I'd be very interested in adding a picture of your Great-Grandfather to the Hampshire Regiment database. I have sent you my e-mail address.

The MIC and Medal Roll entry for Pte 39450 John Matthews indicate an entitlement to a pair (Victory Medal and British War Medal). Thus, your Great-Grandfather did not enter a theatre of war (Mesopotamia) with 2/7th Hampshire's until sometime after 1st January 1916. He could well have been in India prior to this date though.

Bit difficult at this stage to comment on the service chevrons that you mention without first seeing the photo.

I have some initial evidence from my database to suggest that the service number held by your Great-Grandfather covered regular soldiers with the Hampshire's (which included conscripts to regular and new army units) who were serving on regular army attestations (that is, conditions of enlistment) and then were subsequently posted to a TF unit as required. I can't be 100% confident about this though and wouldn't like to commitment myself any further at this stage.

Summary Movements of 2/7th Hampshire's from India are as follows:

From India the 2/7th Battalion sent a draft of one officer and 50 men in August 1915, and another one officer and 100 men, in October 1916 to the 1/4th Hampshire's in Mesopotamia. The latter draft had 49 men killed and wounded, mostly at the crossing to the Shumran Bend, on the 22nd February 1917.

While in India, the Battalion received 400 men in four drafts from the 3/7th Hampshire's in England, and just before leaving for Mesopotamia, a draft of 50 men from the 1/7th Hampshire's.

The 2/7th Hampshire's left India on 4th September 1917 enroute to Mesopotamia, where it arrived on September 11th 1917, on board the H.T. "Egra".

On arrival the Battalion was sent to Aziziyah, where it remained till January 1918, when it went to Amarah and stayed there a further 8 months. In September 1918, the Battalion was attached to the 13th Division and sent to Table Mountain. On 27th December 1918, the Battalion returned to lines of communication where it was gradually demobilised.

Hope that this is of some use.

Regards

Marc

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Annette Burgoyne

Hi Marc

I have copies of South Shropshire Absent Voters Lists, I can look for Hampshire Regiment chaps if you want ?

Annette

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Hello Marc

Many thanks for the information and for your efforts on my behalf - it's much appreciated. I will endeavour to copy the photograph of my great-grandfather for you and e-mail it through. In the meantime, the following photograph (which I already have scanned) was taken in August 1918 in Mespot. but I'm not sure where - I can't quite make out the writing! Does the indecipherable place name (at least to me) mean anything to you and does it tie in with the movements of the 2/7th?

Best wishes

Ed

post-16-1096755507.jpg

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Marc

I've just scanned one of the remaining two that I have. This shows John in rather relaxed pose - the overseas service chevrons are clearly visible. I also have another one of him; I'll send better quality scans of all of these via e-mail for your database. Any comments/information gratefully received!

post-16-1096755863.jpg

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Does the indecipherable place name (at least to me) mean anything to you and does it tie in with the movements of the 2/7th?

Ed,

I would suggest that this is Qalet Saleh.

In January 1918 the 2/7th hampshire's moved down the Tigris to Amara and remained there until nearly the end of September. During this period the battalion did detach a company each to Masharah and Qalet Saleh.

Marc

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Any comments/information gratefully received!

Looks to me like he is wearing three service chevrons. I believe that a chevron was earned as soon as the recipient stepped ashore on foreign soil. Thus the service chevrons for Pte 39450 John Matthews indicate that he most likely served overseas from sometime in 1916 to some time in 1918. This photo was taken in 1918 (or after). I say most likely as I think that it was also possible for service chevrons to be issued for service in 1919.

An interesting point on the cap badge - the 'stirrup' in the centre was in fact a dog guage, a device used in the New Forest (Hampshire) to prevent dogs from chasing the deer. Basically any dog that could get through the guage had its' 3 middle claws removed..... strange folk in the Forest!

Marc

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Hello Marc

Many thanks for your prompt response to my postings. I'll send better quality scans of the pictures that I have to you via e-mail. I'm pleased that you were able to identify where the bathing picture was taken - which company was despatched to Qalet Saleh as a matter of interest?

I have to say that I originally though that there might be four chevrons as opposed to three? I'll try and do a close up of these for closer examination. I did see a recent thread on the forum which mentioned that it might be possible to receive one for overseas service in 1919.

The cap badge is certainly an unusual one - I understand that it was traditionally thought that the device was King Rufus' spur but, as you say, it is in fact a dog gauge!

Many thanks for your help Marc - it's much appreciated.

Kind rgds

Ed

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Will,

On April 22nd 1918 the 1st Hampshire's and the Rifle Brigade were involved in the capture of Pacaut Wood.

There are three pages in the regimental history that cover this attack.

If you can send me your e-mail address off forum then I will scan and send these pages to you.

Regards

Marc

Marc.................Great stuff, I've sent you a PM with my email address.

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