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Remembered Today:

Captain C.P.L. Marwood


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From the CGWG site:

Name: MARWOOD, CHARLES PHILIP LYSAGHT Initials: C P L Nationality: United Kingdom Rank: Captain Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regiment Secondary Regiment: Nigeria Regiment, W.A.F.F. Secondary Unit Text: attd. 1st Date of Death: 24/11/1915 Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead Cemetery: ZARIA MEMORIAL

Cemetery: ZARIA MEMORIAL Country: Nigeria Locality: unspecified Location Information: Zaria is in Zaria Province in the Northern Region of Nigeria, approximately 81 kilometres by road north of Kaduna. The memorial is located about 1 kilometre east of Zaria European Cemetery which is close to the Baptist Mission, off Western Way and Circular Road. The GPS reference is N11 degrees 6 minutes 21 seconds, E7 degrees 43 minutes 12 seconds. The Zaria Memorial was erected by the public and commemorates 330 Commonwealth soldiers belonging to the 1st and 5th Battalions of the Nigeria Regiment who lost their lives during the 1914-1918 War. No. of Identified Casualties: 330

Does anyone know what action took place in Nigeria during 1914-1918?

Regards

Richard

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There were several actions, mostly either side of the border between British and German East Africa, followed by the invasion of German East Africa. In September 1914, the Germans mounted an attack along the coast, which reached 25 miles south of Mombasa. The KAR were instrumental in causing the Germans to retreat.

Subsequently, von Prince, under instruction from Lettow-Vorbeck, captured and held Taveta, which is near Kilimanjaro. This was the only piece of British territory that was occupied by the Germans in the Great War.

On 15th September, the East African Mounted Rifles were aboard a steamer on Lake Victoria. They were engaged by a small German steamer carrying a pom-pom quick firing gun.

In late 1914, the British attempted to take Longido, north-west of Kilimanjaro, but failed. I don't believe that any British East Africans contributed to the abortive landing at Tanga but they were involved in the subsequent invasion of German East Africa.

In December 1914, the British occupied the coastal town of Jassin, only to be ejected again in early 1915

Bukoba, on Lake Victoria, was briefly occupied by the British.

Throughout 1915, the Germans frequently raided into BEA, focusing particularly on the railway.

The invasion of German East Africa began on 5 March 1916. The costly (in terms of lives) pursuit of Lettow-Vorbeck lasted the remainder of the war. He was hailed as a hero in Germany after the war ended.

Robert

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There were several actions, mostly either side of the border between British and German East Africa, followed by the invasion of German East Africa. In September 1914, the Germans mounted an attack along the coast, which reached 25 miles south of Mombasa. The KAR were instrumental in causing the Germans to retreat.

Subsequently, von Prince, under instruction from Lettow-Vorbeck, captured and held Taveta, which is near Kilimanjaro. This was the only piece of British territory that was occupied by the Germans in the Great War.

On 15th September, the East African Mounted Rifles were aboard a steamer on Lake Victoria. They were engaged by a small German steamer carrying a pom-pom quick firing gun.

In late 1914, the British attempted to take Longido, north-west of Kilimanjaro, but failed. I don't believe that any British East Africans contributed to the abortive landing at Tanga but they were involved in the subsequent invasion of German East Africa.

In December 1914, the British occupied the coastal town of Jassin, only to be ejected again in early 1915

Bukoba, on Lake Victoria, was briefly occupied by the British.

Throughout 1915, the Germans frequently raided into BEA, focusing particularly on the railway.

The invasion of German East Africa began on 5 March 1916. The costly (in terms of lives) pursuit of Lettow-Vorbeck lasted the remainder of the war. He was hailed as a hero in Germany after the war ended.

Robert

Are you saying that Nigerian units fought in East Africa as well as West Africa?

I think that, to be buried in Nigeria, these casualties were probably as a result of fighting the Germans in West Africa. Was the/a German colony called Togoland?

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The men on the Zaria Memorial were casualties in Cameroun and East Africa. They are not necessarily buried in Nigeria. Most have no known burial location.

Men of the Nigeria Regt also took part in the East African campaign and some are buried there or listed on memorials (eg the Mombasa Memorial).

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Are you saying that Nigerian units fought in East Africa as well as West Africa?

No, just saying that it was too early in the morning for me to answer the question properly :lol:

For the defence of Nigeria and West Africa, the British had created the West African Frontier Force. This had 242 British regular officers, 118 British NCO's and over 7,500 African soldiers. 5,400 soldiers were from Nigeria.

On 14 August, the British invaded Cameroon, which was a German colony. One force attacked the hill fort of Mora in the north, having crossed the border on 25th August. After assaulting the fort for 2 days, they retreated back across the border with heavy casualties.

A second column attacked Garua, not far from Yola. It too was beaten back with heavy casualties on 30/31 August.

Further south, a third force managed to capture Nsanakang. The Germans counter-attacked and virtually annihilated the British. 71 African soldiers were killed, two mountain guns were captured, along with machine guns and ammunition.

In September, an amphibious landing bought about the fall of Douala. Gradually, the British worked their way inland, eventually capturing the fort of Yaounda in January 1916. This was achieved by the 4th Nigerians. Evenutally, Mora was finally captured and Cameroon fell to the combined English, French and Belgium forces. The British had suffered an estimated 4,600 casualties, with 1,600 killed, mostly by disease.

I am not aware that any Nigerian soldiers fought in Togoland as it was then called.

Robert

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Just confirming that the names on the Zaria Memorial are largely those that died in East Africa together with a smaller number from Cameroun. There are also some who died at sea and some who died in Nigeria.

There are six such memorials in Nigeria covering these and other actions.

The men who died in Togoland were largely from the Gold Coast Regiment (who also fought in East Africa) and are remembered on the Kumasi and Accra Memorials in Ghana.

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Many thanks for the information gentlemen.

Found a bit more info at http://www.mgtrust.org/togo.htm and http://www.mgtrust.org/cam.htm with photographs.

Regards

Richard

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