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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

French F1 Grenade


Gunner Bailey

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Ive got a French F1 Grenade (body only) with the letters ARE moulded into three segments on the side. The A being near the fuse end and the E towards the base.

Anyone got an idea of whether this is WW1 or WW2 and also the manufacturer?

Gunner Bailey

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Hi Gunner Bailey,

I cannot help with the actual name but ARE is quite a common F1 manufacturer. I have seen plenty and to the best of my knowledge they were Great War examples. As you probably know the F1 which was used and later copied by the US forces to become the famous 'pineapple' was one of the few bodies to be virtually unchanged post war (fuzes changed of course) and therefore v. difficult to be sure.

post-569-1178126177.jpg

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Is there any difference in the bodies of the French F1 grenades and the Soviet F1 grenades in use upto (and beyond?) the 1960's?

cheers,

Dave.

(PS - Max. The centre grenade on your first scan. Is that a french F1, or is it the (failed) US Mk.I grenade with a French 1915 percussion fuse attached?)

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Wrong pic...

Thats a 1916 Billant fuze

Mick

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P1 Mle. 1915 F1 with Mle. 1915 Percussion fuze F1 with Mle. 1916 Billant fuze

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Well, the fuzes are irrelevant really as we are discussing bodies. Any grenade you ever find for sale will almost certainly not be sold with the fuze to which it may have once shared company. Basically it is easy to buy a post war body with a 14-18 fuze and do not age a body by it's fuze. ;) With British (bar say Mills 36) and German (bar say Egg) this is rarely a problem but as with much French equipment the OF, F1 grenades etc saw long service. The French habit of never dating most stuff doesn't help...

Dave, Russian grenades? Haven't got a clue! 14-18 British/French/German grenades that is my thing... Not sure on the French/US thing either - all these grenades were cast in enormous amounts by many different factories with many different moulds. Many F1's I have seen have been sharply defined, many more 'rounded' - majority were 14-18 though.

Re' dating F1's I seem to remember that there may be a difference in the manufacture of early/late as some F1's had a 'soldered' lead base plug closure, some didn't...

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Wrong pic...

Hi Max,

That's the one, 100%. I also have an F1 with the earlier simple contact fuse, and that screws into the ARE body, so there is no difference between the threads, so the grenade could be any time from WW1 vintage to the inter - war period.

If you compare the US pineapple and the F1 the Americans did make subtle changes to the shape. The pineapple has more sloped 'shoulders'below the fuse and may be slightly longer in th body. The fuses were a definite copy of the French versions.

I'd like to think my new F1 is WW1 vintage.

Many thanks

Gunner Bailey

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Dave, Russian grenades? Haven't got a clue! 14-18 British/French/German grenades that is my thing... Not sure on the French/US thing either - .

I was just wondering about the bodies on the market because the Soviets produced many millions of F1's from the 1930's through to the 1960s. I wonder how many WW2 and beyond Russian grenades are actually sold as French WW1, especially unmarked examples - I can't see much difference in the bodies at first glance? (Though the Soviet versions are actually worth more moneterilly wise).

I was asking about the middle grenade because it gives a hell of a resemblance to the US Mk.I grenade in shape (it would do, it was a copy of the F1 after all!). If it turns out to be the Mk.I, you've got yourself a real rare piece there! (Pity you don't have the duffer of a fuze mechanism on it though).

dave.

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Hmmm, I don't know Dave, the old F1 is so common and as I say I could show many variations in body castings. Most I have seen were French I believe. A few more (one with original wooden transit plug - that might be IIWW - terrible memory...):

post-569-1178138925.jpg

post-569-1178138939.jpg

post-569-1178138955.jpg

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Hmmm, I don't know Dave, the old F1 is so common and as I say I could show many variations in body castings. Most I have seen were French I believe. A few more (one with original wooden transit plug - that might be IIWW - terrible memory...):

Here's a useful link for French Grenades

http://members.shaw.ca/dwlynn/french/frenchguide.htm

Gunner Bailey

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