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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

HMS Indus


keithchristmas

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Hi,

I have come across a reference to a LSGC medal being awarded to a Ch Sto on HMS Indus. This would be about 1902-1904.

Does any one have any information about this ship?

Regards,

Keith

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Hi,

I have come across a reference to a LSGC medal being awarded to a Ch Sto on HMS Indus. This would be about 1902-1904.

Does any one have any information about this ship?

Regards,

Keith

What follows is a small part of a chequered (note this word to add to your Office dictionary Microsoft :P ) and complex history which I started looking into a few years ago when I was researching on the vessels that formed the artisan (later artificer) training establishment hulks of HMS Fisgard, which is where I began my naval service in the early 1960s it then being a 'Stone Class' frigate.

I began with a three pronged flow chart under headings of Tenedos, Indus and Fisgard which has become rather complex, I will not attempt to replicate it in its entirety here particularly as I was not able to settle some grey areas through lack of access to sources. My library is now somewhat richer so further progress may be made in the near future.

Note that roman numerals do not necessarily mean a vessel was replaced by the next in sequence as these training establishments consisted of a number of hulks simultaneously with each hulk being given the next numeral in sequence.

Indus I from 1898 -ex Defence of 1861, in the Hamoaze (Devonport) 1890-1935 then sold for scrap.

Indus II in 1904 was the name given to the old ironclad Temeraire (1876-) when in Wilcove, Devonport renamed Akbar. Have information that she went to Invergordon in 1910 as depot ship with Indus IV –ex Tenedos –ex Triumph

Indus III 1904 -ex Bellerophone (of 1865), sold 1922

Indus IV 1912 became Algiers on transfer to Invergordon.

Indus V of 1910 (-ex Tenedos III 1906) was ex-Ganges a teak built 2nd rate built in Bombay and launched in 1821 was a port hospital ship in 1914. Ganges became Impregnable in 1922 and was sold for scrap in 1929. Some of her timbers were used in the construction of the Drift Bridge Hotel on the Reigate Road in Epsom, Surrey, there being a plaque on the front wall of the hotel announcing such.

Personally I find the British warships of the mid to late Victorian period (amongst them Ballard’s Black Battlefleet) fascinating.

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Hi,

Many thanks for the information. I agree, quite fascinating. Do you know what HMS Indus would have been used for during the perod 1902-1904?

Keith

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  • 2 weeks later...
Do you know what HMS Indus would have been used for during the perod 1902-1904?

Keith

That would be Indus I, ex-Defence, a training ship in 1902.

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Many thanks for the additional information.

Do we know what training was undertaken on this ship? Would a Ch Sto have been serving on the ship as an instructor?

Regards,

Keith

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Many thanks for the additional information.

Do we know what training was undertaken on this ship? Would a Ch Sto have been serving on the ship as an instructor?

Regards,

Keith

Quite possibly, indeed more than likely as Indus, Tenedos and then Fisgard were training ships for mechanical engineers i.e. stokers and then the more highly trained artisans known as artificers under the reforms of Jackie Fisher from 1903. Fisher recognised the future needs of the increasingly technologically equiped navy as propulsion, armaments, electrical equipment and then aviation continued to advance.

When I started in the early 1960's one of our first metal cutting tasks was the good old hammer and cold chisel, hard, noisy and potentially hazardous work with wire screens between bench stations. We were trained to cut and fit intricate shapes in mild steel, cast iron, brass and aluminium using nothing more sophisticated than engineer's sqaure, calipers, rules, hack-saw, files aided by a surface table and scribbing-block, a little copper sulphate (for providing a scribing base on MS), chalk (for preventing pinning when filing cast iron) and white spirit or paraffin (for preventing pinning when filling light alloy).

Such as I have just described would have been recognised by the artisans of that earlier age.

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Many thanks once again. I found the information concerning your own training very interesting.

I now have a much better idea of the work undertaken on Indus.

Many thanks

Keith

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