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Remembered Today:

Help! Rhys Glyndwr Lewis 60 Squadron RFC


Glynnpeters

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Hi ,

A friend is trying to trace details of Rhys Glyndwr Lewis ( R. Glyn Lewis) of 60 sq RFC.

In particular she is wondering what : forfeit all medals auth nw/6/14239 would mean.

Any help with why he would forfeit his medals appreciated.

Any links to 60 Sq site that might offer help , muchly appreciated.

Her interest is that she has letters from him sent to a relative during the war.

Good hunting , yourself!

Peter

The info she has given me to work on is:

swb roll of officers 1914-37

lewis , rhys glyndwr , le1773

rfc lt suspense , list / 40 , rfc officer roll 168/178e bw.vic. forfeit all medals auth nw/6/14239

pi11759

60 sq pow repat leave x pow

flying corp 1/4/18

releasing commision 20/9/1919

mid

posted 60 sq france bwm vic rfc off 168 page 178e

medals issued and forfeited all medals nw/6/14239

took off 0730hrs in se5a number b8419 60 sq

op patrol , shot up and damaged

returned to base ok

21 may 1918

took off 0415 hrs on op , ablain court , engine problem , landed near shaulnes or harbonnieres 13 th june 1918 , pow , repat 13 12 1918.

28th may 1919 , posted to 29 tr sq on

1st 8th 1919 to 8 tr squadron - leighterton

relinquished commision 20th sept , 1919.

bwm , vic , mid

forfeit

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From "Sixty Squadron R.A.F. 1916-1919" by A.J.L. Scott:

"During one patrol, led by Belgrave on June 12, in which he shot down a two-seater, R.G. Lewis, whose engine presumably had failed, went down and landed, breaking his under-carriage. H.A. Gordon, a Canadian whose first trip over the lines this was, landed beside him and got out of his own machine. At this point some soldiers appeared and opened fire. Gordon ran back to his S.E., calling to Lewis to get in with him, but the latter, apparently mistaking the troops for friends, walked towards them. Gordon then took off and circled round, meaning to fire, but, seeing Lewis in the midst of them, refrained, and returned home with machine very badly shot about. He was killed two months later."

Purely speculation, but a suspicious mind could interpret the above action in a way that could account for medals being forfeited. I re-emphasize that this is just speculation. I have no knowledge of why they were forfeited or even what that means exactly.

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Does your friend have any personal details on R.G. Lewis? Where was he from etc?

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Hi,

Thanks for those replies. The circumstances of him becoming a POW is very interesting & I need my friend to run her statement by me again that he 'did not try to escape' , but her inference was that it was in the POW camp itself that he did not try to escape. So that is very interesting. Thanks.

He was born approx 1897 , and was from / born in Merthyr Tydfil. I think his father was a Chemist. In WW2 (1942) he was an investigating clerk for the Ministry of Aircraft.

Peter

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Hi there,

I've looked up the family in the 1901 and 1891 censuses and have found some information on them. Rather unusually - and I've never seen it before - but the 1891 entry for this family is in Welsh though all the surrounding entries are in English. His father was dead before 1901 as his mother (Gwen) is listed as a widow, aged 25. His grandfather, a Rhys Abraham was a "gwneuthurwr offerynau cerdd"....a maker of musical instruments!

If you need more, send me a PM.

Trebrys.

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Peter

In the excellent reference by Sturtivant and PageThe SE 5 File, 2Lt R G Lewis of No 60 Sqn is associated with the following aeroplanes:

B8419 - damaged in combat with enemy aircraft, 21 May 1918;

C5449 - overran aerodrome and turned over on landing, 16 May 1918, aircraft not worth repairing;

C9498 - failed to return from patrol 13 June 1918;

D3913 - engine trouble, then overturned when landing at a French aerodrome, 14 May 1918, aircraft struck off;

D3966 - engine overheated, force landed and crashed, 31 May 1918, aircraft struck off.

I hope that this helps.

Gareth

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Gareth ,

Many thanks for that information. It seems he had trouble landing...hmmmm...Superb information , much appreciated.

Trebrys,

Thanks for the Census Reports. Also much appreciated.

These bits and bobs are all very important in helping my friend draw up a picture of the man. I am awaiting a copy of a photo of him which I will put up for interest.

I traced H.A.Gordon who was with him when he landed and got captured. Gordon being kia two weeks later.

I found this at the Canadian site

Peter

post-4033-1177005250.jpg

post-4033-1177005271.jpg

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I can't seem to find details about Gordon's demise in "The Jasta War Chronology" that lists German victories and casualties for that day. Strange!

I wonder whether Lewis was denied the medals because the authorities did not accept his account of his capture? I think I'm right in saying that all officers had to write a report narrating the circumstances of their capture and were punished/rewarded accordingly :unsure: It could be that they thought that Lewis hadn't put enough of a fight??

Trebrys

(Iwan)

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Peter and Iwan

Lt HA Gordon of No 60 Sqn was flying SE 5a B137 when he failed to return on 7 July 1917. He had left Boffles aerodrome on an Offensive Patrol at 1800, and was apparently all right when last seen between Lamotte and Albert at 1850. There had been an earlier fight with enemy aircraft over Villers-Bretonneaux - perhaps he was wounded, or his aeroplane was damaged, in the fight and crashed later.

Best wishes

Gareth

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Hi Gareth,

As ever.......many many thanks!

Iwan.

Peter and Iwan

Lt HA Gordon of No 60 Sqn was flying SE 5a B137 when he failed to return on 7 July 1917. He had left Boffles aerodrome on an Offensive Patrol at 1800, and was apparently all right when last seen between Lamotte and Albert at 1850. There had been an earlier fight with enemy aircraft over Villers-Bretonneaux - perhaps he was wounded, or his aeroplane was damaged, in the fight and crashed later.

Best wishes

Gareth

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13 June 1918 , Captain James Dacres Belgrave who led the raid in which Lewis landed his plane , was killed.

Incredibly , these were very young men - Cpt Belgrave was a mere 21 years!

The more I read about this Squadron , 60 Sqd , the more I am becoming obsessed. From being stopped in the street with a name , then I look at some of the names who served with the Sq. Billy Bishop , Albert Ball. Amazing.

I have to thank you guys for your help.

Peter

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Would official records of these forfeitures be kept anywhere I wonder? Would they be recorded in any newspapers?

Trebrys

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