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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Norman Callaway


Steven Broomfield

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On 3rd May, 1917, Norman Callaway of the 19th Battalion, AIF, was killed at Bullecourt. His body was lost, and his name is on the Villers Bretonneux Memorial. The CWGC entry states that he was son of Thomas and Emily Callaway of 22 Eblery Street, Waverley, NSW.

What it doesn't tell us is that in the 1914-15 season, Callaway, in his only First Class game, scored 207 for NSW against Queensland - one of a select few men to score a double-century on their debut.

I have been unable to find any more; Bean seems not to mention him; Jack Pollard's seminal History of Australian Cricket doesn't mention him; none of my other cricket references mention him. A web search only shows the bare data in Cricinfo.

Out of interest, does anyone know more about ths lost genius? Would he have rivalled Bradman or Archie Jackson? Would he have stood up to Larwood and Voce, Bowes and Allen? Or would he have gone back to Grade Cricket? We'll never know, but has Norman Callaway really been so forgotten?

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I don't think they are closed. My grandfather fought in WW2 and his records were updated when he died in 1984.

Probably very concience workers keeping an eye out and adding to files.

Cheers

Kim

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Kim - thanks.

What a player he might have been. Outshadowing Charlie MacCartney, and a contemporary of Alan Kippax.

Great stuff, Kim. Thanks again.

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He sounds like a player with much potential, possibly even a future great. What a shame we were never to find out.

Cheers,

Tim L.

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Here are the scores from the game. The source is First Class Cricket in Australia Vol.1 1850-51 to 1941-42, compiled by Ray Webster and edited by Allan Miller, published in 1991 by Ray Webster.

Cricket author David Frith in his book The Golden Age of Cricket 1890-1914 wrote: Another casualty of some sporting significance was Norman Callaway, whose solitary innings for New South Wales, in February 1915, amounted to 207 runs in as many minutes. What cricket-field glories might have awaited a batsman of such demonstrable potential?

post-5991-1176202139.jpg

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Thanks ceebee. I like Mailey's 2nd Inning figures.

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Quite a few, Kim...quite a few. From our side of the water, I suppose Colin Blythe's potential had been fulfilled, and the South African Reggie Schwarz had done it all, too, but I reckon there must have been a few future Test stars out there we'll never know about.

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South African Reggie Schwarz had done it all, too.

Steven

I don't normally read threads about cricketers, but I had a look at this one.

Reginald Schwarz MC is also remembered as a fly half who won three Rugby caps for England: v Scotland in 1899 [lost 0-5] and v both Wales [lost 0-13] and Ireland [lost 6-10] in 1901. After service in South-West Africa, he became a Major in the King's Royal Rifle Corps during the Great War. Unfortunately, he died from influenza a week after the Armistice.

Regards

Gareth

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Steven,

From our side of the water, how about Percy Jeeves, perhaps the best all rounder in England in 1914, and expected to be a regular for his country in the coming years. Unfortunately like so many others, killed in the summer of 1916 while serving with the Warwickshire Regiment.

His name was immortalised by P.G.Wodehouse.

Tibby Cotter was killed when he stuck his head above the rim of the trench to verify what he'd seen through his periscope. Often wondered what he'd seen that was so interesting. Didn't realise he'd been killed at Beersheba till now, when looking him up in David Frith's excellent The Golden Age of Cricket 1890-1914.

At 33 maybe Tibby's best playing day's were behind him, but still a tragic loss.

Cheers

Eric.

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  • 2 years later...
Tim, the same could be said for Tibby Cotter.

Cheers

Kim

Think Cotter' s playing days with the national side were over before the war. Read somewhere (sorry no links/ references... I can' t remember where) that Cotter was the "inventor" of the bean ball, was cautioned for being drunk while on duty in Gallipoli and due to his celebrity status was let into the Light Horse even though he couldn' t ride

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Also, this reference that I can' t produce, indicated the source of the story describing the circumstances of Cotter death, was fellow national team player Bert Ironmonger. Ironmonger served in France, not Palestine, and therefore his version of the story was, at best, second hand

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