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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

g granddad rfa


gigg

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hi all

ive got my great grandfathers service record from kew, would anyone be able to tell me were he served please

frederick thomas day bn redditch 1898

joined 13th may 1914 aged 16 5 mnths

service numbers 961 2198 845715

8th nov/26th nov 1915 sg hospital bristol, toes ammuptated ,double hammer toes

26th nov/31th dec 1915 red x hospital lyndsey

27 apr 1916/8th june 1916 brimstone bottom ,ruebella

3rd redditch bty ( i know a bit about these)

48th divisonal ammunition column

a bty 59th brigade

i also have a wallet he own embossed in the leather is souvenir de salonique 1918

thank you gigg

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Hello Gigg

The 48th Divisional Ammunition Column was attached, as you would expect, to the 48th Division:

http://www.1914-1918.net/48div.htm

The LIX (59th Brigade ) was attached to the 11th Division:

http://www.1914-1918.net/11div.htm

The service record should provide you with the date of entry into F&F and the transfer between the 48th DAC and RFA 59th Brigade.

The double hammer toes sound horrendous but the 'brimstone bottom' sounds much worse! :o

Regards

Mel

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Hello gigg and welcome to the forum.

I was almost disppointed in a way when I found this on Wiltshire County website:

1900 An isolation hospital was built in Brimstone Bottom. No doubt where he was treated for his measles.

Keith

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Hello gigg and welcome to the forum.

I was almost disppointed in a way when I found this on Wiltshire County website:

1900 An isolation hospital was built in Brimstone Bottom. No doubt where he was treated for his measles.

Keith

Keith

You rotten spoilsport! :lol:

regards

Mel

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His hammer toes were no doubt caused by ill fitting footwear. As he joined at 16 with his feet still growing, 18 months in probably the same boots would do him no good at all.

Interestingly, two and a half weeks in hospital following feet surgery, 6 weeks in hopsital for measles. I suppose it shows the fear they had of epidemic speading in the trenches.

Keith

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thanks guys for your response

ill look into the links thank you ,im glad brimstone bottom was a place and not a complaint yes his haamer toes were the result of ill fitting shoes a common compliant for the time i belive ,my grandfather used to tell me he had 6 toes thats why he had them amputated but he was a bit of a card with a school boy grin .would he have moved about so much because of his toes and measels

regards gigg

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This is only speculation but I think he would have moved from the Gneral Hospital to the Red Cross one for physio after his surgery. Loss of big toes (I presume) means you have to relearn your walking style as the big toes have a lot to do with your natural balance. As soon as he was able, he would be out of the General and into the other, presumably because they would be after the bed - a bit like nowadays really. Measles wise, he would have to be isolated in those days to prevent the spread of the disease and its fever. This was over 50 years before there was a vaccine for rubella and it was responsible for several deaths then. As soon as the symptoms manifested themselves he would have been off like a shot (no RFA pun intended) to prevent spreading it to his colleagues.

On the other hand, I've been laughing to myself all day about brimstone bottom!

Keith

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