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Remembered Today:

oerlikon 20 mm a/a cannon


Guest beechie
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On browsing a naval website I noted a picture of a WW2 anti-aircraft gun, the Oerlikon 20 mm canon. The caption stated that the design was adapted by the Swedes from a weapon installed in German WW1 aircraft. The designer's name was Becker.

The naval version has a 'can' type magazine, and other surfing reveals some straight magazines.

Could anyone direct me to a picture of the original version please

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First of all, Welcome to the Forum!

There's a photograph of a Becker 2cm type 2 cannon installed on an Albatros J.I on page 150 of A Pictorial History of the German Army Air Service 1914-1918 by Alex Imrie, published in 1971. The manufacturer delivered 111 examples of the Flugzeug-Maschinen-Kanone Becker Spandau Typ 3 by September 1918.

I hope that this helps you.

Gareth

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Thank you Gareth.

As it may take a little time to lay hands on that book, might I ask for a brief description of the magazine in the Albatros version and an estimate of the no of rounds held.

The naval version apparently used GREASED ammunition, would you know if that was a feature of the Becker mechanism? It may have been part of the naval conversion.

Thanks again

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Alas, there's no magazine attached to the weapon in the photograph. I don't know about the greased ammunition, but it would be unusual for an aerial weapon.

Regards

Gareth

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German records indicate that several hundred 20mm Beckers were manufactured before the end of the war (428 by MAN alone) although only 362 were discovered by the Allies. Becker themselves were slow in production although they delivered 111 in September 1918 (not a total of 111 by September). About one third were supplied to the army for anti aircraft and anti tank use.

After the war in 1921 the rights were acquired by SEMAG of Switzerland (not Sweden) and developed further. The original German round was the 20 x 70RB and SEMAG extended the case to 20 x 100RB. In 1924 the rights were bought by Oerlikon who continued development to become the well known 20 x 110RB of WW2.

The WW2 Oerlikon utilised oiled rounds to "float" the case in the chamber and ease extraction. The earlier Becker and SEMAG guns did not.

Not surprisingly, the Becker even turned up in China during their many wars of the 1920s and 1930s.

Here are some pictures (will need several posts)

The first is of the aircraft mount.

Regards

TonyE

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Here is a better photo of the gun. The mount is an improvised one by the British, probably for test firing.

The magazine held twenty rounds.

TonyE

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The improved Oerlikon version of the Becker was also tested by the British in the early 1930s but not adopted.

I will also post pictures of the ammo when I can remember where I filed them!

Regards

TonyE

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Here is a (not very good) photograph of the ammunition for the Becker 20mm cannon. These two are high explosive and armour piercing. The case length of these is 70mm.

I have better photos but I still cannot find them, but will post when I do.

Regards

TonyE

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Thanks very much Tony, and Gareth.

There seems to be a lot of morphing between the original Becker and the naval Oerlikon, and one could not get a better illustration of that from any ''other'' source.

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Hello,

Pic original WW1 German 2 cm Becker rounds.

Regards,

Cnock

post-7723-1175008250.jpg

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Guest beechie

Thanks again to all.

Does anyone have pictures or diagrams of the Hotchkiss automatic or machine rifle that was used by light cavalry in WW1?

(on reflection, it may be better to ask the question seperately,,, so please refer to new question.)

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