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Remembered Today:

Private A E (Edward)Howgate Private A T Howgate


dorrie
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post-3860-1174226852.jpg Attached is a picture of three Ssoldier named Howgate I am trrying to establish who is who the one on the right appears to have Lincs badge i think which would make him A E (Edward). I am not suer of the other badges and they are not paricularly clear. Any help please

Thanks

Tim

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Tim

I think the one on the right is Lincs Regt,too. I found details in CWGC of:

25499 Private A E HOWGATE 2 Lincs. Died 15/4/1917 and buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension ROUEN in grave O VIII D 3. This maybe a Died of Wounds case as there was a large Hospital area in Rouen and it was well west of the front line. Records show this man to be the husband of Mrs E E HOWGATE of 22 Northfield Way, Retford. Notts.

The man in the middle is likely to be:

12253 L/Cpl A T HOWGATE of the 16th Kings Royal Rifle Corps,died 23.4.1917 (probably killed in action) and remembered in Bay 7 of the ARRAS MEMORIAL as he has no known grave. Records show this man to be the son of John Robert and Alice HOWGATE of 39 Moorgate,Retford.Notts.

The man on the left looks to have the bandolier of the Artillery, and boots and spurs,maybe of the Royal Horse or Field Artillery,BUT his badge is not of the Artillery as far as I know. Maybe he was a cavalry man ? Someone here will correct that probably. Did he die in the War too ? There are ten HOWGATEs on the War Graves site (CWGC) and I was unable to progress the remaining 8 to this man without positively knowing his unit,certainly not tie-ing anyone in to Retford as well.

Best wishes

Sotonmate

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AE Howgate and AT Howgate were brothers . the 1901 Census shows two others with the same surname John D and Fred W Howgate. I have looked at the MICs for these names and can come up with an F W Howgate in the RGA

Only ae and At died and are commemorated on the Retford memorial

Tim

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Tim

...The man in the middle is likely to be:

12253 L/Cpl A T HOWGATE of the 16th Kings Royal Rifle Corps,died 23.4.1917 (probably killed in action) and remembered in Bay 7 of the ARRAS MEMORIAL as he has no known grave...

Best wishes

Sotonmate

From The Annals of the KRRC Vol. V The Great War by Major-General Sir Steuart Hare

pges 201-202 (April 23, 1917 Croisilles):

"On April 23 the 33rd Division attacked a section of the Hindenburg Line between Croisilles and Fontaine-lez-Croisille. The attack was made towards the north-east, astride the Sensee River, with the 100th Brigade on the right, the 98th on the left.

The following account of the attack is taken from the report of the G.O.C. 33rd Division:

'The attack of the 100th Infantry Brigade south of the Sensee River was carried out by the 1st Queen's Regiment, with the 16th KRRC in support.

At this point our main line of defence was some 1,500 yards from the German line, and it was not possible to approach within assaulting distance during daylight. The approach to the enemy's position, therefore, resembled in all respects a night march, followed by an assault. Careful arrangements were made by the 100th Infantry Brigade to ensure the success of this movement. The 1st Queen's assembled...undetected by the enemy; the 16th KRRC were kept in support in the quarry [some half-mile from the German line].

At 4:45 a.m. the 1st Queen's advanced to the assault under cover of the barrage, and quickly took the front Hindenburg Line. The advance to the second line was continued almost immediately.

Owing to (a) the wire in front of the second line not being properly cut, (B) and hence the barrage not dwelling sufficiently long on the second line, only elements of the 1st Queen's reached the second line, and a permanent footing in it was not gained.

At 8.30 a.m. a message was received from 100th Infantry Brigade that a heavy enemy barrage on the Sensee Valley and Croisilles-Fontaine Road was preventing reinforcements being sent from the 16th KRRC (in the quarry) to assist the 1st Queen's. The counter-battery group were at once asked to deal with the situation, and enemy barrage ceased at 9 a.m., thus enabling the 16th KRRC to get forward. The first reinforcing waves of the 16th KRRC started before the barrage ceased, and they passed through it with great steadiness, as if on parade, although suffering considerable losses.

Before the 16th KRRC arrived, the 1st Queen's were driven out of the Hindenburg Support Line, and endeavours were made to block and hold the front line. Owing to the distance to be traversed, difficulty was experienced in getting supplies of bombs up. At 12 noon the Germans heavily counter-attacked the 1st Queen's and 16th KRRC, and at 1.55 p.m. it was reported that they had been driven out of the front Hindenburg Line.

Both battalions suffered very heavy losses in officers and other ranks. Two tanks had been allotted to the 100th Infantry Brigade for the operation, but owing to mechanical troubles, they never arrived at the starting point, and took no part in the operations.'

"The losses of the Battalion were: wounded and missing--Captains E. M. Gonner, A. B. Bernard (both died of their wounds); killed, 2nd Lieutenants R. H. Garrard, G. L. Spreckley; 6 officers wounded; other ranks--

killed and wounded, 260."

Chris

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