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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Images of VC winner - artistic licence ?


mikebriggs

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Dear all

I thought that I would share these two images, which I believe depict the same event. This is when Captain Vickers of the 1/5th Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt) won the Victoria Cross for his bombing exploits during the attack on Hohenzollern Redoubt 14th October 1915.

Is there some artistic license :D

On the left (from a Nov 1915 publication) he looks a bit like Errol Flynn, whilst on the right its clear that he popped back to mess for a clean (freshly pressed uniform) and a quick G & T B)

Of course don’t let my flippancy detract from the very courageous efforts of Captain Vickers – I just thought that these images are good examples of War propaganda

post-4619-1172752722.jpg

Cheers

Mike

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Dear all,

I thought that I would share these two images, which I believe depict the same event. This is when Captain Vickers of the 1/5th Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt) won the Victoria Cross for his bombing exploits during the attack on Hohenzollern Redoubt 14th October 1915.

Is there some artistic license.

On the left (from a Nov 1915 publication) he looks a bit like Errol Flynn, whilst on the right its clear that he popped back to mess for a clean (freshly pressed uniform) and a quick G & T.

Cheers Mike

Seems he left his pistol and "binos" back in the mess as well :P hard to imagine that a man in the trenches could remain like a Tailors Dummy.

Connaught Stranger :D

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Seems he left his pistol and "binos" back in the mess as well :P hard to imagine that a man in the trenches could remain like a Tailors Dummy.

Connaught Stranger :D

And his moustache by the looks of things... :ph34r:

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So what else is new?

I have yet to see an artists impression that comes close to a battle. The dying hero lit by a heavenly glow, black powder battles often with little or no smoke (certainly none obscuring the view) and notice too how few men their are in these trenches.

Artists show a cleaned up version of war; what do you expect?

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I am happy to stand corrected but dont the wooden stakes in the picture on the left have more to do with images of the wild west than WW1. Who or what were they intended to repel?

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An artist's impression of barbed wire defenses at least he's heard of barbed wire.

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oh you skeptics

you'll be telling me next that the wounded man isn't going to take out brushes from his leather bag and start polishing the Officer's shoes

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you'll be telling me next that the wounded man isn't going to take out brushes from his leather bag and start polishing the Officer's shoes

No he is saying "Be careful with that you nearly had my eye out!"

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As Stuart has kindly pointed out to me I made a typo.

Vickers served with 1/7th Battalion -Robin Hoods

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Geoffrey_Vickers

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"MASSSSTER! IGOR, GOT ANOTHER SACK OF BOOM BOOMS FOR MASTER" slobber, slobber, Drool, Drool, :P

Connaught Stranger :D

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So what else is new?

I have yet to see an artists impression that comes close to a battle. The dying hero lit by a heavenly glow, black powder battles often with little or no smoke (certainly none obscuring the view) and notice too how few men their are in these trenches.

Artists show a cleaned up version of war; what do you expect?

So what else is new?

I have yet to see an artists impression that comes close to a battle. The dying hero lit by a heavenly glow, black powder battles often with little or no smoke (certainly none obscuring the view) and notice too how few men their are in these trenches.

Artists show a cleaned up version of war; what do you expect?

Witness the many, many artistic (not to mention cinematic) depictions of Custer's Last Stand, many of which betray great licence, not to mention inaccuracies; the most basic howlers show Custer with his trademark long hair (which was actually cropped before he left on campaign) and flourishing a sabre (the 7th Cavalry left its sabres behind, apart from one officer's, which was used to kill snakes). One or two relatively modern artists have researched the subject and depicted the Last Stand with photographic clarity - though the event itself would have been obscured by dust and smoke. There is an excellent chapter in Brian W Dipple's Custer's Last Stand discussing some of the better-known paintings and considering the general theme of the portrayal of historic battles. Some of the paintings show the aftermath of the battle and all are sanitised because they could not show the stripped and mutilated bodies of the soldiers.

Moonraker

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