Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

2 POWs from Huddersfield


Ken Lees

Recommended Posts

I have been given two postcards sent from POWs in January 1916 to a Miss C Kelly, Oakes Girls' School, Huddersfield, thanking her and the girls for parcels received by the men, presumably local men, at Christmas 1915.

The two men are:

9980 Cpl R H Hammond, 2nd West Riding Regt

and

7291 Pte A Thornton, West Riding Regt.

How can I find out more about these men? I believe Alfred Thornton may have been from Kew Hill. Is that an area of Huddersfield?

I will try to scan the cards and post the resultant images later.

Do we have any Forum members with a particular interest in Huddersfield or the West Riding Regt?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you checked the LLT link for POW's ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is all I have for the two lads, both were taken POW in 1914.

John

9980. L/Cpl. Hammond, R H. 2nd Battalion. West Riding Regiment. Home address:11 Daisy Street, Turnbridge, Huddersfield.

7291. Pte. Thornton, A. 2nd Battalion. West Riding Regiment. Home address: 7 Kew Hill, Longwood, Huddersfield.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is all I have for the two lads, both were taken POW in 1914.

John

9980. L/Cpl. Hammond, R H. 2nd Battalion. West Riding Regiment. Home address:11 Daisy Street, Turnbridge, Huddersfield.

7291. Pte. Thornton, A. 2nd Battalion. West Riding Regiment. Home address: 7 Kew Hill, Longwood, Huddersfield.

Thanks John.

Where did you find the information that they were both taken POW in 1914?

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks John.

Where did you find the information that they were both taken POW in 1914?

Ken

Ken

They are on the West Riding Regiment Roll for POW taken before 25th December 14, and entitled to the Princess Mary's Christmas Gift.

jOHN.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Longwood is around the Milnsbridge / Golcar, Colne Valley end and not far from Oakes, which is on the main road from Huddersfield to the M62. The only Kew Hill I can find is close by the M62 but not in Longwood; it could have been the name given to a small place that is no longer standing. Turnbridge is just outside the town centre off Wakefield Road, and is now cleared of housing, it was the gas works and power station end of town. Today it would be described as a former inner-city slum area. It was packed with terraced houses and factories, and the smell from the gas works was terrible.

There is the Colne Valley Guardian, a small newspaper that very conveniently keeps all its news of local men in the same place, making it much easier to find than the other local papers. That is something I will be able to take a look at for you next week, it might have a report on the Longwood man. The Huddersfield papers are more difficult but I might spot something at some point in the future.

The Mayoress of Huddersfield had a fund going for parcels for prisoners from very early in the war. In July 1918, Mrs. Wimpenny, the chairman of the Huddersfield Prisoners of War Help Committee, said there had been a rapid increase in amount of assistance needed recently. The cost of food parcels was now £3. 7 shillings 6 pence each per month. The Holmfirth Express knew of twenty-three Holmfirth prisoners at that time, requiring around £80 per month. The paper appealed for funds to cover the cost of the Holmfirth men, donations were to be sent to Mrs. W. E. Wimpenny, Cote Royd, Huddersfield.

The 2nd Battalion started using five digits before the war, but I don’t know when. Victor Rayner 10613 enlisted in June or July 1914. Ira Donkersley 10442 joined the 2nd Battalion around November 1912. Hubert Moodycliffe 9165 enlisted around 1907. Green Coldwell 6431 was a reservist. The 1914 2nd Battalion prisoners that I know of were all taken at Le Cateau.

I will check that paper.

Tony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The girl in this story went to Oakes Girl’s School and may have helped with the parcels:

HUDDERSFIELD DAILY EXAMINER

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 26th 1914

LITTLE OAKES GIRL’S ROMANCE.

A LETTER AND ITS SEQUEL.

About the resent requisitioning of horses for service with the troops there was much that was pathetic, and a little girl named Ivy Clayton, who lives at Syke Field, New Hey Road, and attends the Oakes Girl’s School, experienced something in the nature of a personal sorrow when a horse called Lady, belonging to her people, was taken away to join the ranks.

But before the horse was requisitioned there had been a farewell ceremony, and when the little mare was marched off she carried with her the tokens of a child’s sorrow. Tied to the horse with a piece of blue ribbon were a label and a sprig of heather, and on the label was written this message: “Sorry she has to leave us. Hope she will return to us safe and sound. With much love.” And beneath the words were crosses that were eloquent in their profusion.

Now comes the sequel. On Thursday a London daily paper announced the receipt of a letter from a gunner in the Royal Horse Artillery, who wrote from Woolwich as follows: “I would be obliged if you would inform Ivy Clayton that her little horse has arrived here safe and well, and that she can rest assured that Lady will receive every attention during her brief stay with us. Sincerely hoping that she will soon recover her pet.”

A hope in which we cordially join.

Tony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a look at the Colne Valley Guardian but could not see any mention of the Longwood man. I did find something interesting about bread for prisoners in the Holmfirth Express. The local vicar wrote to the paper saying he had been reliably informed that if two ounces of lard was rubbed into the dough, the bread would keep long enough to be edible when it reached Germany. The Mrs. Wimpenny mentioned earlier responded with this:

“Sir,- Having read an interesting letter in last Saturday’s issue of the Holmfirth Express on the best way to make bread for sending to prisoners of war, we shall be glad if you will kindly allow us to bring to the notice of your readers the fact that in Berne, Switzerland, a large department has been opened by the British Section of the Prisoners of War Help Committee under Mrs. Grant Duff, wife of His Majesty’s Minister there, to undertake the baking of bread and despatching it to our prisoners in Germany. For the sum of 4/- per month each prisoner receives 4 lbs. of bread weekly. We hear that the bread sent through this medium reaches our prisoners very quickly and quite fresh. Should any of your readers wish to send bread by this means, we shall be glad to forward their money in our cheque if they will kindly send the full address of the prisoner, and 4/-, on the sixth of each month to us at 85, Westgate, Huddersfield. - I am, &c., Kate H. Wimpenny. Chairman, Prisoners of War Help Committee, Huddersfield and District. President, the Mayoress Mrs. Blamires.”

I never though of people posting bread to Germany; or sending it from Switzerland - at four shillings for four pounds of bread per week for a month.

Tony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...