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Hotchkiss Revolver Cannon


withcall

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Regarding my earlier post, my dutch colleague reckons it's from something called a Hotchkiss Revolver Cannon. These seem to have been around since the 1890s and were , amongst other places, mounted in French forts. If he's right, why would the ammo be German made...?

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post-9859-1172097554.jpg

Regarding my earlier post, my dutch colleague reckons it's from something called a Hotchkiss Revolver Cannon. These seem to have been around since the 1890s and were , amongst other places, mounted in French forts. If he's right, why would the ammo be German made...?

Indeed it is the round also used in the Hotchkiss Revolving Cannon. It is the 37 x 94R cartridge.

As I pointed out in the previous post, it was used in the Maxim 37mm Pom Pom used by most belligerents in WWI, principally as an anti aircraft or anti balloon weapon. The Maxim dates from the 1890s and saw extensive use by the British in the South African War.

In WWI the German version was known as the Maxim Flak M14. The picture below is courtesy of Dolf Goldsmith from "The Devil's Paintbrush".

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Although not applicable in this case, I should have answered your question regarding why the Germans might make ammunition for a French weapon.

It was quite common for the Germans in both wars to manufacture ammunition for captured weapons, either by continuing production at captured factories or by making it in their own facilities.

For small arms ammunition, I have German manufactured 8mm Lebel and 7.62mm Russian cartridges, both manufactured by Poltewerke in 1918.

Regards

TonyE

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