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Canning Town


chrisharley9

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Could anyone please point me in the direction of the correct cemetery for this part of London

Chris

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Chris,

Main place for burials in this area is the East London Cemetery, Plaistow.

Regards

Paul J.

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Paul

My thanks

Chris

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Might be worth looking at local churhyards as well. Some people were buried in these. The parish where the home was.

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Hello Chris

If you do visit Plaistow, I would be interested to hear if the graves of the Germans executed for espionage are still intact:

http://www.stephen-stratford.co.uk/wwi_spying.htm

Regards

Mel

If I do get down there I will give their graves a visit

Chris

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Might be worth looking at local churhyards as well. Some people were buried in these. The parish where the home was.

I was under the impression that the local churchyards were closed for burials by the Great War?

Chris

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If you do visit Plaistow, I would be interested to hear if the graves of the Germans executed for espionage are still intact:

Only the marked grave of Carl Hans Lody still can be found at Plaistow despite having been disturbed by bombing in WW2. The other spies are buried in unmarked common graves though there is a memorial bearing their names nearby. These graves have been used again for subsequent common grave burials.

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  • 11 years later...

I came across this thread as I was researching the man that arrested Lody in Ireland, DI Charles Cheesman. The information on Lody's grave from Wikipedia is

 

 Lody's body was buried in an unmarked common grave in the East London Cemetery in Plaistow along with seventeen other men – ten executed spies and seven prisoners who died of ill-health or accidents. It was not until 1924 that the grave received a marker, at the instigation of the German Embassy. Lody's relatives were visiting it once a year and enquired whether his body could be exhumed and buried in a private grave. The War Office agreed, providing that the body could be identified, but the Foreign Office was more reluctant and pointed out that a licence for exhumation would have to be authorised by the Home Office. The Lody family placed a white headstone and kerb on the grave some time around 1934.[92]

 

In September 1937 the German government again requested that Lody's body be exhumed and moved to a separate grave. This proved impractical for several reasons; he had been buried with seven other men, each coffin had been cemented down and the lapse of time would make identification very difficult. Instead, the British Imperial War Graves Commission suggested that a memorial should be constructed in another part of the cemetery to bear the names of all the German civilians who were buried there. The proposal met with German agreement and the memorial was duly installed. During the Second World War, Lody's original headstone was destroyed by misaimed Luftwaffe bombs. It was replaced in 1974.[92]

 

One further proposal was made to rebury Lody in the 1960s. In 1959 the British and German governments agreed to move German war dead who had been buried in various locations around the UK to a new central cemetery at Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. The German War Graves Commission (VDK) asked if it would be possible to disinter Lody's body and move it to Cannock Chase. By that time, the plot had been reused for further common graves, buried above Lody's body. The VDK was told that it would not be possible to disinter the other bodies without the permission of the relatives, which would have been an almost impossible task where common graves were concerned. The proposal was abandoned and Lody's body remains at Plaistow.[93]

 

 

 

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  • 8 months later...

Hello Chris. A bit late in checking this post. I wonder if there is a list of Germans executed with Lody. I have been trying  to track down a great uncle for 15years. Regards Paul.

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Hello all

 

First World War Trials and Executions by Simon Webb has these names:

(Carl Hans Lody 6 November 1914)
Carl Frederick Muller 23 June 1915
Haicke Marinus Petrius Janssen 30 July 1915
Willem Johannes Roos 30 July 1915
Ernst Waldemar Melin 10 September 1915
Augusto Alfredo Roggen 17 September 1915 (body repatriated to Holland)
Fernando Buschman 19 October 1915
George T Breeckow 26 October 1915

 

The Encyclopaedia of Executions by John J Eddleston has all the above, plus the following:

Irving Guy Ries 27 October 1915
Albert Meyer 27 November 1915
Ludovico Hurwitz y Zender 11 April 1916

 

Robert Rosenthal was hanged at Wandsworth on 15 July 1915 for spying. All of the others were shot at the Tower of London.

Apart from Lody and Roggen, no mention is made of the places of burial.

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton
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Apart from Lody and Roggen, no mention is made of the places of burial.

 

My understanding was that they were buried within the precincts of a prison in an unmarked (but known ) grave

 

Sir Roger Casement was buried like that when he was hanged during WW1, and his body later repatriated to Ireland (though I understand there was little to repatriate as like the rest he was buried in quicklime

 

 

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