Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
Andrew P

Australian Unit Histories

Recommended Posts

Guest stevebec

If I may be so bold to add the following I have but not on Andrews list;

1Bn History,

6BN

9Bn

41Bn

45Bn

46Bn

49Bn

50Bn

51BN

53Bn (small book not much there)

All Light Horse Histories;

1st ALH to 13th ALH including 8th ALH Bio and 12th ALH personal history by Fowler. Also 3 LHFA

I also have a number of Books of the Camel Corps.

S.B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

That's good fella's. Amongst all of us we should have most of the units covered.

Jack

There's no unit history of the 1st Tunnelling Company, but I have a bit of material on the Australian Tunnellers so will see if I have any further info.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest paddy

G'day agen Andrew.

There's always someone whingeing!

What about the poor old seventh? Didn't anybody bother to "write them up"?

Slouch Hat Publications will, however, publish a new Battalion History soon.

Steve, I have a copy of Sand Sweat & Camels, somewhere. I love the bit where the Boss & 1 Trooper discover some treasure, and the trooper suggests the old "bury it now, come back later" trick. Am awaiting publication, or even drafts, of your Camel story

ooRoo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Hi Jack

Sorry, but couldn't find any further info. I've got much more material on the 3rd Australian Tunnelling Company than the 1st.

Anyway I'll keep a lookout if I see anything on the 1st Tunnellers.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest paddy

G'day Jack G'day Andrew

Suggest you start with a copy of Hill 60 Ypres by Nigel Cave. There is also an extensive note at Vol 4 of The Australian Official History. The Diary of an individual sapper was published as What did you do in the war Daddy. I'm only guessing from the date of "your man's" citation but not too long before the large mines were blown the Germans broke into the tunnelling system and there appears to have been a pretty hairy time. Anyway that's your project. Warning! Be prepared to get "hooked'

Wish you well

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jack

Thank you both, Andrew P and Paddy,

Ill keep digging, too.

Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blackblue

I possess unit histories for the following 1st AIF battalions + 2nd Light Horse and a full copy of the official history of the 1st AIF.

1st Btn

2nd Btn

6th Btn

8th Btn

9th Btn

10th Btn

11th Btn

12th Btn

14th Btn

15th Btn

17th Btn

21st Btn

22nd Btn

23rd Btn

24th Btn

25th Btn

28th Btn

29th Btn

30th Btn

33rd Btn

39th Btn

40th Btn

41st Btn

42nd Btn

44th Btn

45th Btn

46th Btn

48th Btn

49th Btn

51st Btn

57th Btn

60th Btn

2nd Light Horse

I possess the following 2nd AIF battalion unit histories.

2/3rd Btn

2/9th Btn

2/15th Btn

2/17th Btn

2/25th Btn

2/26th Btn

2/31st Btn

2/32nd Btn

37th/52nd Btn

39th Btn

49th Btn

52nd Btn

61st Btn

Any queries please e-mail me on timdawe@bigpond.com

Regards

Tim Dawe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blackblue

I forgot to add that I also possess "The Battle History of the Royal New South Wales Regiment". This includes details of the engagements of the following battalions:

1st AIF

1, 2, 3, 4, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 45, 53, 54, 55, 56.

(The 41st was predominantly a Queensland battalion in WW1 but was 'stolen' by New South Wales after WW2).

2nd AIF

2/1, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, 2/13, 2/17, 2/17, 2/18, 2/19, 2/20, 2/30, 2/33.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P
(The 41st was predominantly a Queensland battalion in WW1 but was 'stolen' by New South Wales after WW2).

Thanks Tim. A very extensive list.

To add to the 'stolen 41st', the 51st Bn which was a West Australian battalion in WW1 was 'stolen' by Queensland after the war.

Never really seen a good reason for that happening, unless it was to replace the 41st. :blink:

By the way does that Black over Blue triangle in your message signify the 25th Bn?

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blackblue

Not sure about the reasons behind the 51st relocating Andrew. According the the Army website they first went to NSW after WW1 before going to FNQ in 1936 where they have remained since this time.

The 41st going to NSW has always been a bit of a sore point for me being a Queenslander because a good mates grandfather, L/Cpl Bernie GORDON, won a VC with them in WW1. The 41st was predominantly a Qld Battalion however they received a large number of recruits from the Northern Rivers area of NSW and continued to do so when they became CMF after the war. Despite being amalgamated with various NSW battalions before and during WW2 they were initially a Royal Queensland Regiment unit after WW2. They then became a Royal NSW Regiment battalion in about 1965. Despite having asked many people why over the years I haven't yet managed to find an answer as to exactly why. It seems to make sense, as you suggested, that there were enough battalions in SE Queensland and not enough battalions in Northern NSW.

25th Battalion the colour patch is. I am a member of 25/49 RQR.

Regards

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew Smith
Andrew,

can you explain to me what information Bean has in his Official History on Australians who served in the BEF?

I notice in the entries at the AWM that he collected information about several of them eg G S Kingsell in " biographical and other research files" which are held in AWM 43.

But what does he actually say about them in the Official History?

I have several of these men, and don't want to purchase copies of these files, if the info is summarized in the books.

Christine

G'day Christine,

I have been into the AWM a few times t check Beans files on Australians that served with the RNAS etc. These files can be boom or bust. Some have only date of birth etc while others have postings personal correspondence from the men to Bean, photos etc etc.

Bean tried to contact nearly every Australian that he was aware of that served with allied forces. If you are ever in Canberra they are worth a look at.

Regards,

Andrew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Henschke

Ian, this should cover your man in ;

1st Field Company

On 10 November 1917, the 1st Aust. Division was relieved in the line by the 66th British Division. The 1st Field Coy moved back in stages to a rest area at QUESTEQUES.

On 11 December 1917 the 1st field Coy returned to the front line at Kemmel.The ground there was frozen solid to about 8 inches.

By 30 January 1918 the Coy was out of the line ( a two and one half hour march) at Neuve Eglise, near Bailleul. Although it was a fairly decent camp,many of the sappers were sorry to leave the place up the line because they had well established dugouts and plenty of fuel.

By mid February, the Coy was still at Neuve Egliseresting, but working on baths, laundries and three large stables.

In late February, 1st Field Coy returned to the front line at Basseije. At that time they were living in a huge tunnel and dugout system with sleeping accomodation for 17 officers and 680 men, besides having a Brigade HQ, RE HQ, a Signals office as well as mess rooms complete with cookhouses.

Extract from War Diary

‘In April the Coy moved to Pradelles after marching 4 hours one night, all night the next and entraining at 4am. 12 hours on the train, a 7 mile march, the next day another march, then a days work. That evening they received orders to return to the front from which they had just left which meant a march from 1145pm to 6am, entrained and a 12 hour train trip, detrained at 1am, marched until 6am, 2 hours sleep, another march to the line and at 230pm commenced work. Three days and two nights without sleep.

1 May 1918. Dismounted personnel under Major D.G. SINCLAIR moved from billet at PRADELLES at 9am to a new position at LE ROUKLOSHILLE location R 3ld 3.1 sheet 27. Work was taken over from the 3rd Field Company on the left sector of the Divisional sector. Work was continued on the preparation of a thoroughly defensive position. Besides preparing the Front and Support Lines – the following places were taken over for work as strong centres – FOUNTAIN HOUCK – La BESACE fm – PHINCBOOM – lying N to NE of METEREN which is in German hands.

Later the large village of CAESTRE was prepared as a defended locality. Roads were prepared for blowing in the event of enemy progress along the front. Cellar accommodation was strengthened for use as Regimental Aid Post, Battalion Aid post, Battalion and Company HQ – usual trench work of excavating and wiring also progressed. Company transport under Captain J. E. G. STEVENSON was located at P36c.0.7 sheet 27. horses are now picketed in the open, but the weather is gradually becoming milder. Transport is being used to a great extent as it is necessary to use this means of getting all RE material forward in the absence of Light Railways. The strength of the Company, without reckoning detached men is 7 officers 191 O/R, of the latter, 69 O/R belong to the mounted section. Working parties are supplied by the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade – and one Section of this Company is allotted to each Battalion.’

1st Field Company was raised in August 1914 in New South Wales.

In general terms, during the winter of 1917-1918 all five of the AIF Divisions took their turns in manning the Messines-Warneton front. For the most part the sector was quiet, the only activity being occasional raids to establish the identity of opposing troops - the sappers providing detachments to accompany raiding parties when called for. a lot of work was done with wire entanglements, shell-proof posts, roads, tracks and communication trenches.

regards,

Chris Henschke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Henschke

In addition, I can cover the gaps with;

10th Battalion (both unit histories and complete war diary)

27th Battalion (unit history)

7 Field Company (unit history

Chris Henschke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Hi Tim

I've never actually seen a copy of the 33rd Bn history. Is it very detailed?

There's a soldier I'm researching called John Luff from Fremantle WA, who was killed with this battalion at Messines.

About 40 -50 men of the 2nd reinforcements to the 44th Bn were transferred to the 33rd about December 1916. Included in this group were Luff and the VC winner James Carroll.

Chris

Does the 27th Bn history say much about the 5th of November 1916?

A relative of mine, No.171 Pte Phillip George Pittaway was killed on this date.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gem22

Andrew

Can you help me with some information from your unit histories. I'm after details on this man:

2485 Pte Harry Jones 8th Battalion Australian Infantry. Can you tell me where his unit was, or had been, on the 18 August 1916.

I'm trying to produce a booklet about the men named on our village war memorial. Harry was born here and emigrated to Australia in April 1914, with his pal Morley Theobald. I have details of Morley's death at ANZAC cove with 14 Battalion, but I'd like to fill in a bit more abiut Harry other than the fact that he died on the Somme.

Thanks

Garth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blackblue

Andrew,

The 33rd history is quite detailed -although not to the extent of other histories, a lot is based on the personal account of a few men and the war diary. The copy I have actually has a card cover and is A4 size with 120 pages of so of narrative regarding their actions. The book is locally written and published in Grafton. The rear has a large section of boigraphical details of many of the men.

Pte LUFF is mentioned in Page 36.

"One note of interest for May involved pigeons. The signallers used pigeons to carry messages, which in turn created a need for pigeoneers. On the 2nd May eight men were selected for this job. Privates G.Meredith and Q.Watt from 'A' Coy, Private W.Kirwan from 'B' Coy, Privates F.J.Moody. G.P.Williams and W.C.Joyce from 'C'Coy, and Privates W.Schofield and J.S.Luff from 'D'Coy were given the responibilility of carrying the caged birds".

In the biographical section he is listed as:

"LUFF, J.S. No. 1865, Pte, 2nd Reints, joined 'B' Coy at Armientieres on 26.1.1917. Selected as a pigeoneer; RO dated 2.5.1917. Wounded at Armientieres; RO dated 9.2.1917. LIA at Messines; RO of 16.6.1917 (WD)".

Regards

TD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Thanks for that Tim. None of Luff's letters to his wife mention his role as a pigeon handler so that is very interesting.

Garth

I'm pretty sure that the 8th Bn on the 18th of August 1916 was either in reserve or involved in an attack at Mouquet farm, but will check the unit history when I get home from work.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Hi Garth

Checked the 8th battalion history and on the 18th of August they were involved in an attack towards Mouquet Farm.

It seems there was a discrepancy with the artillery in so far as the infantry didn't have the proper timings as it was the first use the 8th Battalion had with the step by step artillery method.

It was the 8th Battalion's biggest loss of a single day during the war with 51 Offficers & Men killed & around 250 wounded and also some taken prisoner.

Unfortunately there is no mention of Jones in the text, only in the honour roll in the back of the book.

Hope this helps

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Henschke

Andrew, this map is from the 27 Bn history and shows the action re 5 nov 1916.

post-16-1072979891.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Thanks for that Chris. Also replied to your e-mail this morning.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ian Underwood
Ian, this should cover your man in ;

1st Field Company

Thanks Chris, That's very helpful.

As suggested by Andrew, I also read "Sargent Lawrence Goes to France", the diary and corrospondance of said Sargent who served with the 1 FCE. Unfortunately, there was little info for the dates I was after as the unit was constantly on the move. It's a good read otherwise.

Cheers again....Ian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest birdflightless

Hi Andrew,

Could you please, when you have time, look up the 13th Battalion AIF, on or around 1st April 1918. I am researching No. 7000, Pte. Alfred Hicks, who is buried in my local Church Yard.

Thanks in advance

Stewart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P

Hi Stewart

I guess you were the one who requested his service record electronically on the National Archives of Australia website?

From his service record it shows that he was wounded on April the 1st 1918. The 13th Bn history called 'The Fighting Thirteenth' by Capt T.A. White has the following about April 1st

"At 1.15am on 1st April ‘C’ was ordered to cooperate with the 16th Battalion in an attack on a strong post some distance ahead of the junction of ‘C’ and the 16th. This attack was another with bombs and bayonet and was wonderfully successful, 71 prisoners and 4 machine guns being captured and over 100 dead Germans counted. We had again definitely taken the offensive and all were in great heart. ‘B’ advanced a post 200 yards into enemy territory, rushing it in broad daylight on two minutes notice; ‘C’ sent out another post on it’s own left, and ‘D’ sent another well towards Puisieux. So well planned and swift were these stunts that we only had two wounded"

Whether Hicks was one of these wounded is not stated.

Alfred Hicks seems to have had a painful end if his service record is anything to go by. GSW to cheeks and face, Gangrene of the lung and then Heart Failure.

Regards

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest birdflightless

Andrew,

Yes it was me!

Thank you for your reply, I am Researching the men on our war memorial and as you will know he is buried in Little Cornard,Suffolk. He is buried in a double grave with his Cousin, Gunner, Maurice East, 7th Batt, Tank Corps. His father was born in the same village as myself.

Anyway thanks again for the info.

Stewart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Seymour

Andrew,

I'm researching the Old Boys on the War Memorial at Thetford Grammar School in Norfolk. William A Green died on 14/3/17 with 44th Bn. AIF. Would it be possible to look him up (I realise ORs rarely get a named mention) or to give me some idea of what his unit was doing then?

I have seen on the web William's 'Particulars Required for the Roll of Honour of Australia in the Memorial War Museum'. This has provided a little additional information.

I note from recent posts that it is possible to get service records online. How does this work? Which web address do you have to go to?

As always very grateful for any help in this project.

Best wishes,

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...