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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

deciphering "dog-tags"


sacqueboutier

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Hello, I'm a new member, so I hope I'm doing this right?

I have my Grandfather's dog-tag from WW1 and just wonder if some kind soul can help me work out all the details on it? The number is TS70066, but I have had awful trouble locating anything through that.

It says ASC - which I take to mean Army Service Corps? The letters "DR" also appear on the tag, but I don't think it means "driver" because to the best of my knowlege he never drove - even after the war. His trade was blacksmith/Farrier.

Is this making any sense to anyone - I really hope so.

All advice welcome.

Al.

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It would be better if you posted his full details. However a driver in the Great War meant a driver of horses and in view of his profession it is probably correct. Welcome to the forum, Al.

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post-19170-1171787607.jpgpost-19170-1171787635.jpg

TS series for ASC could well have been farrier driver. Are you sure the number is correct ? If so search

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documen...amp;queryType=1

you can always try his name if you have it

Hi nittenman and welshdoc,

Thanks for your replies. Driver of Horses - don't know why that didn't occur to me!

Sorry, I meant to include his name in my original message. My Grandfather was Frederick Alma David Stow. His dog-tag just uses his first two initials. Yes I'm sure the numbers are Correct - I have attached a picture of the dog-tag. I have two of his medals as well - the usual two - but I'm surprised there's no star with them?

Unfortunately, although the National Archives was a great help in tracing my Great Uncle (Grandma's brother), I didn't find anything on my Grandfather at all. Grandfather served in France during the Great War and I have books of postcards showing Ypres and Arras after the bombing - I think these were his.

He was never a sergeant for very long. When he had a drink or two inside him, he became a bit of a rebel, so the Army couldn't allow him to continue to lead others. He was good at his job, and was made Sergeant - from time to time - but always managed to blot his copy book, so they took his stripes away again - until he impressed them enough and earned them back. This happened a few times.

After he was wounded in the leg and face/neck he was sent to back to Britain - but not straight home - to Ayscoughfee Hall (Spalding). It was used as a convalescent home.

After the War he worked for a racing stable - I think it was Lord Lonsdale's.

Well - I hope that's a bit more detail to go on. As always - any advice welcome.

Regards,

Al.

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:)

Hiis number is actually TS 10066 and his medal card can be found here.

Thanks Marc, I did get the number wrong after all. It's great to find his medal card. Thank you.

Al.

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It is likely the '35 DT' on the back is 35th Divisional Train.

Paul - This is quite a breakthrough. The 35th Divisional Train. That ties in with Grandfather's phhotographs of Ypres and Albert after the bombing.

The more I learn the more ignorant I think I am.

I'm trying to educate myself into what a Farrier's role would be with 35th Divisional Train, I'm getting there I think. Mostly caring for and shoeing the horses used for pulling waggons (transporting equipment). Is that right? My Grandfather was very skilled at the forge and after the War, I know he made decorative items and things for the kitchen too. He worked in brass as well as steel. Would any of those skills have been used in his Military Service?

Al.

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