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freddy1918

Major-General Geoffrey Percy Thynne Feilding

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freddy1918

Hi,

Is there anyone out there that can help me out with researching the named officer? I am primarily interested in his time commanding the Guards Division. I noticed at the NA that there are war diaries for the HQs of Brigades in the Guards Division, but couldn't find on the catalogue a reference for the divisional HQ, although I have been assured that they must be there.

I did find a few letters up in Worcestershire that I need to get to, and some photos at the National Portrait Gallery but that is about it. The LHA says they have traced no papers.

Has anyone ever come across any descriptions/recollections

Any help greatfully appreciated. :huh:

Cheers

Freddy

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nhclark

Freddy,

This is a very old item that I dug up using Google.

"From: Ken Hallock <curator1@mindspring.com>

Subject: [WAR] FEILDING, G.P.T.

Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2001 10:31:18 -0800

List Members:

I am writing up the life of Major-General Sir GEOFFREY PERCY

THYNNE FEILDING, KCB, KCVO, CMG, DSO, and I need some assistance.

The Times of London 28, October 1932, mentions his burial taking

place at "Monks Kirby, Warwickshire, Churchyard yesterday". I am

looking for a professional researcher or an interested party in

the area of Monks Kirby to find and take photographs of the grave

site.

I mention that if anyone is interested in Maj.-Gen. Sir Geoffrey

Feilding, I would be pleased to share what I have to date.

Thanks in advance.

Ken Hallock

Idaho, U.S. of A."

If you put "Ken Hallock",Idaho into Google you will come up with several links. There seems to be only one bloke of this name who is interested in military matters. One link gives a 'phone number. You could try contacting him using the various e-mail addresses that he has had - one might just be current!

Good luck.

Noel

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Stebie9173

Not sure if this will add value:

Times Monday 24-10-1932

post-6536-1171676439.png

Steve.

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Steven Broomfield

And as I had O'Moore Creagh and Humphris' DSO Bible out, I though "Why not?"

post-6673-1171714523.jpg

post-6673-1171714539.jpg

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Coldstreamer

From Ross of Bladensburg CG 1914/18

post-3871-1171718032.jpg

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freddy1918

Hi guys

Thanks so much for the info, effort much appreciated. Wondering if a paper index of war diaries at the NA is going to prove easier for finding divisional HQ war diaries now...

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Guest ABooth

Sir:

I have quite a bit of information on GPT Feilding and happy to share what I do have with you. Most of my file on him is from the Boer War and his family and such. CDontact me if interested. ABooth

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Von Stossel
Posted (edited)

1920 General Geoffrey Feilding was abruptly and mysteriously asked to retire from his post-war command of the London District by Winston Churchill, who was serving as Secretary of War at the time. Feilding was put on half-pay. (London Command Mystery: Why is General Feilding Shelved? Daily Mail, January 12, 1920).

 

Does anyone have any information as to why he was asked to retire?

 

Geoffrey Feilding.pdf

Edited by Von Stossel
Corrected typo.

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charlie962
Posted (edited)

He was obviously not a happy bunny  (this from NSW Archives)

 

 

                       5afd5ae66df98_fieldingMajGenletter.JPG.7631092bc6f7536f39ddec331786d0c9.JPG

Charlie

 

Newspapers Sept 1920:

 Among the passengers on the White Star liner, Adriatic, which sailed from Southampton yesterday, was Major-General Sir Geoffrey Fielding, K.C.B., D.S.0., who is going on a six months' tour to relatives in Australia

                

Edited by charlie962

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Von Stossel

Thank you Charlie! I am going to request a copy of this letter. 

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charlie962

Perhaps it was connected with the 'Golden Ballot' ex servicemen's charity, started1919,  that is referred to in one of the clippings above. Although trial seems to have been 1922, prosecution was already in the air 1920? No wrong intent, just needed the law changing to alllow charitable lotteries of this type.

Charlie

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Von Stossel
2 hours ago, charlie962 said:

Perhaps it was connected with the 'Golden Ballot' ex servicemen's charity, started1919,  that is referred to in one of the clippings above. Although trial seems to have been 1922, prosecution was already in the air 1920? No wrong intent, just needed the law changing to alllow charitable lotteries of this type.

Charlie

Given the time between the two events, I think you are probably right!

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charlie962
Posted (edited)

Admiral David Beatty was the main patron of the Golden Ballot. He became First Lord of the Admiralty  (edit)Sea Lord in 1919. How did Churchill get on with him?

Edited by charlie962

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michaeldr
14 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

Admiral David Beatty ... He became First Lord of the Admiralty in 1919. How did Churchill get on with him?

 

Very well indeed

Beatty had been Churchill's Naval Secretary 1911-13

and Churchill then appointed him to command the Battle Cruiser Squadron

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Von Stossel

Feilding doesn't seem to have been well liked: “Byng engineered the transfer of Major-General G. P. T. Feilding from the Guards Division to command London District, apparently at Haldane’s instigation. Haldane thought Feilding ‘obstructive. He is given to call on his imagination freely when he is disinclined to do anything he dislikes. I do not care about him personally, and a division such as the Guards is worthy of a much better commander.'” Winning and Losing on the Western Front: The British Third Army and the… by Jonathan Boff.

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SiegeGunner
4 hours ago, charlie962 said:

Admiral David Beatty was the main patron of the Golden Ballot. He became First Lord of the Admiralty in 1919. How did Churchill get on with him?

 

First Sea Lord, surely.

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charlie962
13 hours ago, SiegeGunner said:

First Sea Lord, surely.

Yes,of course. Disconnection between different sections of my brain? I stand corrected!

charlie

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Von Stossel
Posted (edited)
On 17/05/2018 at 06:36, charlie962 said:

He was obviously not a happy bunny  (this from NSW Archives)

 

 

                       5afd5ae66df98_fieldingMajGenletter.JPG.7631092bc6f7536f39ddec331786d0c9.JPG

Charlie

 

Newspapers Sept 1920:

 Among the passengers on the White Star liner, Adriatic, which sailed from Southampton yesterday, was Major-General Sir Geoffrey Fielding, K.C.B., D.S.0., who is going on a six months' tour to relatives in Australia

                

 

Feilding's dismissal from the post, according to the letter in the NSW Archives was because Churchill wanted a friend to have it instead: "I am idle as Winston Churchill has kicked me out from the command of the London District. It is a real job as he only turned me out because he wanted to put a friend of his in. He did it without consulting the Commander in Chief or any of the Army Council and there has been a good deal of indigestion about it: Douglas Haig writing him a very strong letter on the subject."

 

Edited by Von Stossel

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