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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Disembarkation of wounded at London Docks


Tonym

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Can anyone advise me about the arrival of ships carrying wounded troops, in particular the London Docks? Was there a particular dock with medical facilities, ambulance access, etc. where a ship would berth for the disembarkation of the wounded or were they directed to any available dock?

Strange question perhaps but important.

Tony

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Tony

I do know that there was a special dock in the Southampton area,at Netley,a pier which led to the Military Hospital grounds,and was heavily used in the 1914-1918 War. They were also served by Hospital trains from other ports and had a station which was very close to the hospital entrance. London was also served by Hospital Trains to it's main stations,mostly from the Channel ports of Dover and Folkestone,and I would think that this was the quickest way to get casualties to London hospitals. I would think that ships also berthed in the vicinity of London,in these days small ships can go as far up as Teddington,and I guess it would have been the case then also. There were quite a few hospitals made over to the military for the duration.

Do you have a specific thing in mind ?

Best wishes

Sotonmate

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sotonmate

At the moment I have nothing definite to go on but my interest stems from (1) I have and interest in WWI female casualties and (2) A topic posted in Women in the Great War "Nurse killed by horse-drawn ambulance".

I have been in touch with the poster by PM and obtained some personal details that suggested there could be something in the story. His late father, who related the story, sustained serious head wounds at Ypres in 1916 that seriously affected his memory so no specific details were forthcoming other than the fact that it was his sister- the posters aunt, whose body was taken to Jersey for burial, their hometown.

I have two other enquiries out - one with the 'London Docks Archives', in the remote possibility that such an incident may have been recorded and another with 'The Societe Jersiaise' in the hope that someone with a serious interest in cemeteries can advise me of any WWI female burials one may fit the bill.

We do not have a genuine family name as his father ran away from home in Jersey, at the outbreak of war, to enlist in the UK. As he could only speak in Patois, a local Jersey dialect, the Recruiting Sergeant put his name down as Brennan. For some undisclosed reason he would never reveal his proper surname, assuming that he could remember it, but his forenames are said to be Danile Joseph.

If you can suggest any other avenues of research be grateful. No travelling as I have my own problems.

If nothing comes of it it will be good research practice.

Best wishes

Tony

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Tony

You could trawl through all the Commonwealth War Graves cemeteries in Jersey,there are quite a few with WW1 interments. I took a quick look but didn't see any obvious females. You could take a slow look,you might be lucky.

http://www.cwgc.org

Select cemetery and enter Jersey,you will see most of them are CI but some are US/Canada.

Sotonmate

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sotonmate

There was only one female listed on the whole of the Channel Islands, a WREN but WW2.

I am keeping an open mind, at the moment, that the story is true but I now have another possible lead. He says that two of his uncles, his father's brothers, were killed at Jultand and quotes Queen ???. I see that the only ship with queen in its title was the Queen Mary sunk with all hands.

Would you have access to the casualty list, something in excess of 1,700 I think with nine survivors, or would you know where I can view it on line. It might just be possible to identify two brothers with the same surname, apart from the obvious Smiths, Jones, Browns etc.

Fingers crossed

Tony

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Hello

Checking the QUEEN MARY list, in As and Bs alone, there are more than a dozen surnames with two (or more) casualties. The only way to sort the 1270 casualties out would be look at each one and try to tie next of kin or residence together.

All best

don

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  • 2 years later...

Hello Tonym

I am not sure whether you are still pursuing this enquiry, but I've checked the Jersey Rolls of Honour and Service that I help maintain on the Channel Islands in the Great War website: www.greatwarci.net and it is difficult to support the connections.

With regards to Jerseymen on the Queen Mary, six were lost, and none were brothers.

With regards to a Daniel Joseph Brennan, the nearest that can be determined is a Daniel J Brassel who was in the RAMC and with the regimental number 12102.

I would be interested in any update that you can provide in the hope that I can look further.

Kind Regards

Barrie

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