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Stephanie

Not sure where this should be posted..

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Stephanie

Hi Pals!

Not sure where I should've posted this one so sorry in advance if i've put it in the wrong place.

Anyway, in history we're studying "Medicine throughout time" and later on in the module we'll be studying "medicine and health care in the first world war" and all i know really is that it would have most probably increased medical knowledge due to all of the wounded.

Can anyone enlighten me On the subject (I want to get a headstart as im the one thats known to be "obsessed" with the Great War!) ANYTHING will be appreciated and with your abundance of knowledge ive found you have im sure you wont disappoint! ;)

also..did they have latex/rubber gloves?

Thank you!

Steph :D

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Ken Wayman

Hi Steph

Try volume 65 of 'Stand To!', journal of the Western Front Association. Major artcle by Dr. Eric Webb, entitled, 'Military Medicine on the Western Front.'

Regards

Ken

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truthergw

Hi Stephanie. There are medical experts who will be onto this very shortly I am sure. With reference to rubber gloves, asepsis and its implementation were well known by 1914. I can tell you from experience that in traumatic injury, shells, bullets etc. the rapid treatment is more important than aseptic technique. A bullet in the forearm might well mean removal at the elbow so no point in cleaning the wound. More important to staunch the flow of blood and administer painkillers. Rubber gloves would protect the surgeon as much as the patient. They would not have been practical for the stretcher bearers and medical orderlies. The danger of gas gangrene was not fully appreciated but there was little alternative. Radical amputation was the norm and was carried out very close to the frontline. There is an ongoing thread about mercury. This had health uses and you will find it interesting.

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Mick D

Hi Stephanie,

I see you live in Northumberland, well if you check out the DLI museum website, there is to be a lecture on the very subject that you mention, by a Durham doctor in the next couple of months, the lectures are usually at weekends and are a few pounds for the tickets.

Mick D

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Stephanie

Ken: Thanks. Do you know where I could read this?

Truthergw: Thanks a lot. A lot of info there and now i finally know the answer :P thanks again

MickD: Thanks, will check that out on the website and hopefully I might be able to go :)

Thanks all. More info will be great

Steph

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Stephanie

Thanks Pete.

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Canadawwi

I wrote this article for my website on the advances in plastic surgery during 1914-18.

There are also links contained within the article that will take you to some top websites related to this topic.

Plastic Surgery - World War One

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Jarvis

I wonder if your study will include Tea Tree. This 'medicine' was purportedly caried by ANZACs during the Great War and was effective for cleaning and sterilising wounds. I believe it was a root cum potion used by the Aboriginee long before the turn of the 19th century. I am not sure if this is myth or fact (regarding the Great War) but my better half has studied aromatherapy and insists some ANZACs were sent this from home.

In fact in our household we dont reach for TCP or Dettol but Tea Tree and I can vouch for its effectiveness.

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auchonvillerssomme

I bet theres a huge list of medicaments sent from home, Zambuk or Zam-Buk for example.

Mick

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Stephanie

Thanks for the help all. lots of interesting facts :)

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6th Shropshires

Hi Steph

You may find "Roses of No Man Land" by Lynn McDonald, an interesting read. It is not full of tectnical stuff but its an insight into what it was like from medical side.

Annette

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Ken Wayman
Ken: Thanks. Do you know where I could read this?

Truthergw: Thanks a lot. A lot of info there and now i finally know the answer :P thanks again

MickD: Thanks, will check that out on the website and hopefully I might be able to go :)

Thanks all. More info will be great

Steph

Hi Steph

Two possibilities come to mind. Borrow one from a WFA member local to you - a post might well come up trumps. failing all else, the back issues of 'Stand To!' are available for £2-50 from:-

Martin Hornby, 5 Summerhedge Crescent, Othery, Somerset, TA7 0JE

Regards

Ken

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CarylW

Hi Stephanie

Some free online books that might interest you and could be of some help

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7/wwi/memoir/St...rs/PottleTC.htm

"STRETCHERS"

The Story of a Hospital Unit on the Western Front

BY FREDERICK A. POTTLE

Couple of free online books regarding hospitals in the Great War

Click here

There is a free e-book online available to download or read online about the FANY (FIRST AID NURSING YEOMANRY)

at Project Gutenburg http://www.gutenberg.org/

"Fanny Goes to War" by Pat Beauchamp

"Throughout the war the "Fannys" were renowned for their resourcefulness.

They were always ready to take on any and every job, from starting up a

frozen car to nursing a bad typhoid case, and they rose to the occasion

every time"

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16521

There may be some other titles on the subject of Medicine and the Great War at the Project Gutenburg site - all free to read online, download or print out

It's a while since I looked there and they are always adding books

Caryl

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Borden Battery

Here are some additional websites you might find interesting. Borden Battery

General Medical Websites - Part 14

Note: CEF Study Group member websites denoted with asterisk "*"

==============================================

War Story of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

This is a very comprehensive "on-line" book on the Canadian Army Medical Corps during the Great War. This on-line book of some 300 pages [with text, figures and footnotes] includes the following chapters an Introduction, Rise of the CAMC, Assembly at Valcartier, Salisbury Plain, With the BEF in France, Second Battle of Ypres (Gas), Festubert, Givenchy, Plugstreet, Establishment of Hospitals in France, Stationary Hospitals and Other Medical Units. [Recommendation by marc leroux / www.canadianGreatWarProject.com][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/adami/camc/camc.html

Hospitals and Casualty Clearing Stations – BEF

The website includes eighteen direct photostats of documents, dated 13th. July 1923 which were sent from the Ministry of Pensions to the British Red Cross Society Records Office. Theses typed pages give the names of the locations, in alphabetical order, dates and positions of the various Hospitals or Casualty Clearing Stations on the Western Front for the British Expeditionary Force. The names of these medical units are as follows: Bac-Du-Sud-La to Boisleux-au-Mont, Bonn to Bussy - Le- Chateau. Calais to Chocques. Clerques to Don, Duai to Etaples, Etaples to Gezaincourt, Gezaincourt to Hazebrouk, Hazebrouk to Le Quesnoy, Le Touquet to Lozinghem, Mallasise to Moulle, Namps to Paris Plage, Pernes to Recmenil Farm, Remy to Roziere, Rouitz to Sweveghem,Tincourt to Versailles. This material may be of use to researchers trying to verify hospital and CCS locations. [CEF Study Group – Updated Aug 2006]

http://www.vlib.us/medical/CCS/ccs.htm

Nursing Sister Helen L. Fowlds - A Canadian Nurse in World War I

This Trent University website contains the following: #1 Canadian Stationary Hospital - Information about this Hospital (contains maps and image), 53 of Helen's Letters, 16 Assorted Photographs and Images (Lemnos, Le Treport, a typical Hospital Ward, lunch by Pyramids etc.) and three of Helen's Diaries with extra photographs. [Recommendation by Nelson][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://www.trentu.ca/library/archives/ffowldswelcome.htm

The Call to Duty - Canada's Nursing Sisters

This Library and Archives Canada exhibition tells the story of six women who served as nursing sisters during the First World War. "Active Duty" presents the personal diaries, letters and photographs of these women. "Caregiving on the Front" provides a history of nursing sisters during the First World War. Specific sections of the website include: Introduction, The Canadian Army Nursing Corps: Brief History of the Military Nursing Service, The Canadian Army Nurses: Who Were They, Enlistment, The Work of Military Nurses: Living Conditions, Working Conditions, Professional Relations and Social Life and Conclusion

[Recommendation by Nelson][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://www.collectionscanada.ca/nursing-sisters/index-e.html

Royal Victoria Hospital – List of Nursing Sisters in Great War

[CEF Study Group]

http://www.rootsweb.com/~qcmtl-w/RoyVicNursWWI.htm

The Gillies Archives at Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup

The Queen's Hospital, Sidcup performed plastic surgery of the face between 1917 and 1925, and today's Queen Mary's Hospital possesses a unique collection of over 2500 case files relating to that era. The pages that follow show details of the collection; in addition there is background information about the present-day hospital and the Postgraduate Centre as well as the medical bibliography of the Great War and some useful links to sites about the war, plastic surgery and rheumatology. [CEF Study Group - Mar 2006]

http://website.lineone.net/~andrewbamji/index.htm

Kent 1914 - 1919 - Hospitals (Military, VAD, Civil, Special and Private)

This website provides an alphabetical list of over 100 communities in Kent with between 1 and about 25 hospitals down to private homes which were used as part of a medical treatment system during the Great War. The hospitals in Kent were a great mixture of general and specialist main and auxiliary military establishments, VAD hospitals, small convalescent units (sometimes in private houses) and others. There were numerous private initiatives, especially early in the War – some of the more formal examples are the Army Nursing Homes at Folkestone, one Sittingbourne VAD which withdrew from Kent VAD and continued privately, and the Yarrow Home at Broadstairs which was organised and staffed by the Committee of Management for a time. [Recommendation by Chris Bostwick][CEF Study Group - May 2006]

http://www.juroch.demon.co.uk/hospitals.htm

Ada's War – Salvation Army

This simple website is about Ada Le Poidevin, a young Guernsey Salvationist and her work in England, France and Belgium during and after the Great War. This project website has broadened to investigate the work of Salvation Army women in Northern France. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://www.adaswar.net/index.htm

Typhus Fever of the Eastern Front in World War I

David W. Tschanz, MSPH, PhD

This short technical paper outlines the background and implications of the common body louse Pediculus humanus (not the head louse) and the associated virus called Rickettsia prowazeki and the impact of typhus fever on the Eastern Front; specifically in the region involving Serbia. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://scarab.msu.montana.edu/historybug/WWI/TEF.htm

Military Medicine on the Western Front

Dr Eric Webb MB Bchir - 31st October 2001

This short summary of military medicine on the Western Front provides a quick read on the topic. This account takes as its chief source Medical Services - Casualties & Medical Statistics, the final volume of the Official Medical History of the War, originally published in 1931 and reprinted by The Imperial War Museum [iSBN: 1 870423 23 8]. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://home.clara.net/drericwebb/docs/mgw.htm

The 1918 Influenza Pandemic

The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known today as World War I (WWI), at somewhere between 20 and 40 million people. It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as "Spanish Flu" or "La Grippe" the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://virus.stanford.edu/uda/

Military Memoirs of Captain Dark, MC

Dr Eric Payten Dark, 1889 - 1987, was born in Mittagong, New South Wales and qualified as a medical practitioner at Sydney University in 1914, qualifying a year early because of the war. He was among the first hundred Australian doctors who sailed to England to join the RAMC. The following account of his experiences in Flanders, the Somme and Passchendaele was written in the 1970s when Dr Dark was in his eightieth decade and have been published here by kind permission of his son, Mr John Oliver Dark, who holds the copyright. A copy of the original document is in the Dark Papers, MLMSS 5049 item 1, Box 1(1) held at the Manuscript Section, Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales and gratitude is expressed to the Mitchell Library for making this material available. [World War I Document Archive][CEF Study Group - January 2007]

http://www.vlib.us/medical/dark/dark.htm

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Ednamay

Here are some additional websites you might find interesting. Borden Battery

General Medical Websites - Part 14

Note: CEF Study Group member websites denoted with asterisk "*"

==============================================

War Story of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

This is a very comprehensive "on-line" book on the Canadian Army Medical Corps during the Great War. This on-line book of some 300 pages [with text, figures and footnotes] includes the following chapters an Introduction, Rise of the CAMC, Assembly at Valcartier, Salisbury Plain, With the BEF in France, Second Battle of Ypres (Gas), Festubert, Givenchy, Plugstreet, Establishment of Hospitals in France, Stationary Hospitals and Other Medical Units. [Recommendation by marc leroux / www.canadianGreatWarProject.com][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/adami/camc/camc.html

Hospitals and Casualty Clearing Stations – BEF

The website includes eighteen direct photostats of documents, dated 13th. July 1923 which were sent from the Ministry of Pensions to the British Red Cross Society Records Office. Theses typed pages give the names of the locations, in alphabetical order, dates and positions of the various Hospitals or Casualty Clearing Stations on the Western Front for the British Expeditionary Force. The names of these medical units are as follows: Bac-Du-Sud-La to Boisleux-au-Mont, Bonn to Bussy - Le- Chateau. Calais to Chocques. Clerques to Don, Duai to Etaples, Etaples to Gezaincourt, Gezaincourt to Hazebrouk, Hazebrouk to Le Quesnoy, Le Touquet to Lozinghem, Mallasise to Moulle, Namps to Paris Plage, Pernes to Recmenil Farm, Remy to Roziere, Rouitz to Sweveghem,Tincourt to Versailles. This material may be of use to researchers trying to verify hospital and CCS locations. [CEF Study Group – Updated Aug 2006]

http://www.vlib.us/medical/CCS/ccs.htm

Nursing Sister Helen L. Fowlds - A Canadian Nurse in World War I

This Trent University website contains the following: #1 Canadian Stationary Hospital - Information about this Hospital (contains maps and image), 53 of Helen's Letters, 16 Assorted Photographs and Images (Lemnos, Le Treport, a typical Hospital Ward, lunch by Pyramids etc.) and three of Helen's Diaries with extra photographs. [Recommendation by Nelson][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://www.trentu.ca/library/archives/ffowldswelcome.htm

The Call to Duty - Canada's Nursing Sisters

This Library and Archives Canada exhibition tells the story of six women who served as nursing sisters during the First World War. "Active Duty" presents the personal diaries, letters and photographs of these women. "Caregiving on the Front" provides a history of nursing sisters during the First World War. Specific sections of the website include: Introduction, The Canadian Army Nursing Corps: Brief History of the Military Nursing Service, The Canadian Army Nurses: Who Were They, Enlistment, The Work of Military Nurses: Living Conditions, Working Conditions, Professional Relations and Social Life and Conclusion

[Recommendation by Nelson][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006]

http://www.collectionscanada.ca/nursing-sisters/index-e.html

Royal Victoria Hospital – List of Nursing Sisters in Great War

[CEF Study Group]

http://www.rootsweb.com/~qcmtl-w/RoyVicNursWWI.htm

The Gillies Archives at Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup

The Queen's Hospital, Sidcup performed plastic surgery of the face between 1917 and 1925, and today's Queen Mary's Hospital possesses a unique collection of over 2500 case files relating to that era. The pages that follow show details of the collection; in addition there is background information about the present-day hospital and the Postgraduate Centre as well as the medical bibliography of the Great War and some useful links to sites about the war, plastic surgery and rheumatology. [CEF Study Group - Mar 2006]

http://website.lineone.net/~andrewbamji/index.htm

Kent 1914 - 1919 - Hospitals (Military, VAD, Civil, Special and Private)

This website provides an alphabetical list of over 100 communities in Kent with between 1 and about 25 hospitals down to private homes which were used as part of a medical treatment system during the Great War. The hospitals in Kent were a great mixture of general and specialist main and auxiliary military establishments, VAD hospitals, small convalescent units (sometimes in private houses) and others. There were numerous private initiatives, especially early in the War – some of the more formal examples are the Army Nursing Homes at Folkestone, one Sittingbourne VAD which withdrew from Kent VAD and continued privately, and the Yarrow Home at Broadstairs which was organised and staffed by the Committee of Management for a time. [Recommendation by Chris Bostwick][CEF Study Group - May 2006]

http://www.juroch.demon.co.uk/hospitals.htm

Ada's War – Salvation Army

This simple website is about Ada Le Poidevin, a young Guernsey Salvationist and her work in England, France and Belgium during and after the Great War. This project website has broadened to investigate the work of Salvation Army women in Northern France. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://www.adaswar.net/index.htm

Typhus Fever of the Eastern Front in World War I

David W. Tschanz, MSPH, PhD

This short technical paper outlines the background and implications of the common body louse Pediculus humanus (not the head louse) and the associated virus called Rickettsia prowazeki and the impact of typhus fever on the Eastern Front; specifically in the region involving Serbia. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://scarab.msu.montana.edu/historybug/WWI/TEF.htm

Military Medicine on the Western Front

Dr Eric Webb MB Bchir - 31st October 2001

This short summary of military medicine on the Western Front provides a quick read on the topic. This account takes as its chief source Medical Services - Casualties & Medical Statistics, the final volume of the Official Medical History of the War, originally published in 1931 and reprinted by The Imperial War Museum [iSBN: 1 870423 23 8]. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://home.clara.net/drericwebb/docs/mgw.htm

The 1918 Influenza Pandemic

The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known today as World War I (WWI), at somewhere between 20 and 40 million people. It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as "Spanish Flu" or "La Grippe" the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://virus.stanford.edu/uda/

Military Memoirs of Captain Dark, MC

Dr Eric Payten Dark, 1889 - 1987, was born in Mittagong, New South Wales and qualified as a medical practitioner at Sydney University in 1914, qualifying a year early because of the war. He was among the first hundred Australian doctors who sailed to England to join the RAMC. The following account of his experiences in Flanders, the Somme and Passchendaele was written in the 1970s when Dr Dark was in his eightieth decade and have been published here by kind permission of his son, Mr John Oliver Dark, who holds the copyright. A copy of the original document is in the Dark Papers, MLMSS 5049 item 1, Box 1(1) held at the Manuscript Section, Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales and gratitude is expressed to the Mitchell Library for making this material available. [World War I Document Archive][CEF Study Group - January 2007]

http://www.vlib.us/medical/dark/dark.htm

I understand some medical personnel were part of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, which became the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary; their duties were in catering, nursing, administration/clerical, and pay. There is more information in National Archive. Unfortunately closing records were transfered to WRNS of WRAF so my mother's discharge papers are from WRAF, although she worked in the Pay Corps sorting out back pay for casualties, families, etc.

Edna

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centurion

Whilst many doctors may have learned a lot in from WW1 always remember the guys they were learning on. I've seen a number of accounts by men who had been wounded of being operated on by surgeons who in peacetime would not have been deemed sufficiently experienced to do such operations and were in effect learning on the job as there simply were not enough experienced doctors to meet the demand or to adequately supervise. A Yankee in the Trenches by Corporal Homes is available free to down load. In the last section our American in the British Army recounts the treatment in a London hospital of his wounds incurred on the Somme. Enthusiastic but unskilled seems to sum it up.

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RayRob

Hi Stephanie

Some free online books that might interest you and could be of some help

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7/wwi/memoir/St...rs/PottleTC.htm

"STRETCHERS"

The Story of a Hospital Unit on the Western Front

BY FREDERICK A. POTTLE

Couple of free online books regarding hospitals in the Great War

Click here

There is a free e-book online available to download or read online about the FANY (FIRST AID NURSING YEOMANRY)

at Project Gutenburg http://www.gutenberg.org/

"Fanny Goes to War" by Pat Beauchamp

"Throughout the war the "Fannys" were renowned for their resourcefulness.

They were always ready to take on any and every job, from starting up a

frozen car to nursing a bad typhoid case, and they rose to the occasion

every time"

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16521

There may be some other titles on the subject of Medicine and the Great War at the Project Gutenburg site - all free to read online, download or print out

It's a while since I looked there and they are always adding books

Caryl

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RayRob

Great to have access online to the book on the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry Corps ( abbreviated variously as F.A.N.Y ; FANY ; FANNY ; And in a British newspaper - FANNIES)

My interest started with when I sought genealogical information on the surname URQUHART.

That genealogical search has taken me to many places...

Now , I find an Urquhart , among others , was awarded the Military Medal :

"Brave Women Rewarded

THE MILITARY MEDAL

First Aid Nursing Yeomanry . - Driver Evelyn Cridlan , Driver Mary Marshall , and Driver Christina Urquhart.'

- The British Journal Of Nursing , March 29 , 1919

PS I suspect that Christina Margaret Calder Urquhart met her husband-to-be , in the field .

He was an Australian surgeon by the name of Captain ( later professor ) Claude Witherington Stump

These two , the nurse and the surgeon , both served in France , during World War One.

They married at Edinburgh , Scotland , after the War.

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