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Remembered Today:

'Sanitary Police'


Chris Noble
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Hi.

Came across a soldier who's duties were given as 'Sanitary Police'. Without stating the obvious, what exactly were his duties? Did he inspect latrines, create them, make sure they were hygenic or the 'waste' properly disposed of?

My WW1 research has now gone 'toilet' style :D

Regards, Chris.

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Hi.

Came across a soldier who's duties were given as 'Sanitary Police'. Without stating the obvious, what exactly were his duties? Did he inspect latrines, create them, make sure they were hygenic or the 'waste' properly disposed of?

My WW1 research has now gone 'toilet' style :D

Regards, Chris.

maybe he checked to make sure nobody was smoking inthe lavvie ? GAS GAS GAS :rolleyes:

bruce

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Could they be responsible for keeping Tommy away from the out of line "estimets" of dubious nature??

or supervising Bathing & Clothing changing sessions out of the line?

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According to "Military Organisation and Administration" published by Major G. R. N. Collins, 4th. Battn. Canadians Instructor, Canadian Military School, in 1918, the Sanitary Police are responsible for --

1. The preparation and care of latrines and urinals, including the filling in of the same and marking of old sites.

2. The systematic collection, removal, and disposal of refuse by burning or other method.

3. The construction of ablution places and the disposal of waste water.

4. The sanitation of cooking places, horse and mule lines and slaughtering places, in the area occupied by the unit.

The Regimental Sanitary Police are detailed from the strength of the unit, and are vested with the authority of military police for the better performance of their duties. They are under the Regimental Quartermaster for their employment, but the Medical Officer will direct their efforts from the sanitary point of view.

Tom

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The Field Service Pocket Book of 1914 says: "A sanitary policeman should be placed in charge of each latrine, his duty being to see that every man covers up his excreta with earth. Failure to carry out this practice should be punished."

Sorry.

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Interesting information chaps. A bet it was a popular job...not!!

Seriously. Quite important to maintain some sort of hygiene in the trenches which i should imagine was very hard to do so.

Regards, Chris.

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Hi Chris,

Reagrding the popularity of sanitary police-work - this from the Australian 1st Division Sanitary Officer at Gallipoli:

"As the men were simply detailed from infantry units they were the reverse of picked men. It was, however, a pleasant change to them from the monotony of trench life and they soon became enthusiastic in their job and the work was done thoroughly."

Some descriptions of the !st Aust Div sanitary squad's duties:

"They dug and maintained public latrines in addition to cleaning ground occupied by troops.....These men were ordered to keep their area in good condition. If they caught any man flagrante delicto he was forced to dispose of the nuisance. If the offender was unknown and the nuisance light they would attend to the matter themselves. If more serious a report was sent to the divisional sanitary officer who attempted to make the nearest unit take action. If this failed, the sanitary squad sent a fatigue to remedy the order."

Good on you,

Grant

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