Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Jam Pot Bombs


Guest birdflightless

Recommended Posts

Guest birdflightless

Hi All,

Whilst reading through the War Diary of, No. 2 Mountain Battery, RGA, I found a reference to an action on 29/30 July 1915, near Epinette (a retaliation shoot),

whereby Catapults and Jam Pot Bombs, were employed.

Can anyone please enlighten me on what this type of bomb this was.

Thanks in advance.

Stewart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the early days of the war, before the development of grenades, troops made 'bombs' out of jam jars. They were filled with any old bits of scrap iron, a bit of explosive, and a fuse.

Light fuse, throw bomb, and pray like anything that the damn thing blew up in the enemy trenches and not your own.

Garth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to post the recipe for making Jam Pot hand-grenade but then thought twice about it. I just give instruction for getting rid of it.

"Light with a match, pipe, cigar or cigarette, and throw for all you are worth"

Annette

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These were much used in Gallipoli because of a shortage of more conventional grenades/bombs. I have seen published (IWM or AWM sourced?) pictures of soldiers sat amid a pile of tins making these. The short fuse times were an attraction in Gallipoli where it was not uncommon for bombs to be siezed and thrown back whence they came - particularly at ANZAC.

Turkish "bombs" in Gallipoli were of a higher standard and looked like the conventional plotters bomb - a black sphere with a fuse sticking out of the top (but without the wording BOMB). The allies there nicknamed them "cricket ball bombs" and captured supplies were much prized for use against the Turk - especially when used with improvised catapults.

Mrs. W found one such item in Gully Ravine a couple of years ago, intact, and it was accordingly treated with due reverence. The museum at Alcitepe (the village formerly known as Krithia) has an example on display which looks decidedly un-defused.

Martin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:P

Stewart,

If u want to see a picture of one - albeit a repro one - go to the web site www.tommyspackfillers.com it's a UK site which deals in repro 1stww period sundrie items.

GWRCo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stewart,

I think that this is the picture which Martin referred to above

I have taken it from Philip J. Haythornthwate's book in the Osprey Campaign Series

"Gallipoli 1915." The caption reads:

"Manufacturing hand-grenades:empty tin cans are converted to 'jam tin bombs.' The man at the extreme right is using an anvil upon which to cut up barbed wire to pack into the tins to act as shrapnel."

Regards

Michael D.R.

post-23-1069050445.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...