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KONDOA

Despatches from German East Africa

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KONDOA

Chums,

I am sat here in a very hot flyblown internet cafe in Arusha, Tanzania.

This week I have had the good fortune to locate with much effort and follow the route taken by the reinforcing column for DeVenters 2nd South African Division whic left Himo River Camp in May 1916.

The old maps are fortunately proving to be valid to some degree and thus various river crossings were able to be found.

On route to Kondoa Irangi I stopped at Galleppo (previously known as Gwanzave Mission or Ufiome) and was delighted to find the old mission buildings have survived. The importance of these buildings is that they were used as a hospital by the combined SA and Commonwealth force and thus are of historical value to the military history of the East African Camapaign.

From the mission I then ascended what in the war diaries of the 11th Hull HB RGA and the 10th RMA as the Peeinaar or Penarth Heights, a steep climb today up the escarpmant from the Massai Steppe which proved particularly difficult some 90 years ago as the men hauled the guns to the top.

I stopped further along the road to Salanga where the column had camped for the night and recalling the diary of Fred Jackson imagined the lions marauding the camp and getting away with the oxen and mules.

On my approach to Kondoa the road stayed true to the old descriptions with steep inclines and hairpin bends dropping through what would be clouds in the right season of the year.

The approach to Kondoa is over a relatively modern steel bridge over the sand river that was used as a road during the summer of 1916. After an overnight stay in a rather comfortable motel, the old town of Kondoa revealed the oriiginal church that was shelled by Von Lettow with 4.7 guns from behind South Hill. The damage to the church is still discernable. The church it may be recalled was the hospital up until the shelling.

Later I followed the Handeni road eastwards locating the hills. Observation Hill, Middle Hill, Black Rock, Battery Hill and Koens Kop. My Grandfather stood on Battery Hill 90 years ago and so today we were able to put life into his old stories.

Most surprising was in also locatingv the breastworks/parapets of the trench lines that were constructed by DeVenters force to defend Kondoa. Unfortunately , time and poor maps prevented my locating the German positions at Black Rock.

I will be back at the end of the month and if there is a tad of interest I will post a few pictures.

Beer time now!!

Roop

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joseph

Roop,

Good for you, hope you have some good pics.

Regards Charles

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SteveE

Roop

Sounds like you're having fun!!! Look forward to seeing some pics.

If you happen across any 25th RF headstones along the way I wouldn't mind photos of them as well ;)

Enjoy...

Steve

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Neil Mackenzie

Roop.

A very unique battlefield trip!

Enjoy the beer.

Neil

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KONDOA

Teatime Tuesday

In Moshi at the moment, my second visit. Today I first retook some headstones in Moshi Cemetery which I had made a mess of last week. I have several (all) 25th RF Headstones Steve so worry not. Possibly Tanga and Longido next week if there are any special requests.

Headed out this morning eastwards from Moshi along the Taveta road reaching the Kenyan border. The dusty red line across the plain beyond the border heading for Salaita Hill and Mbuyuni Camp beyond. Perhaps another trip eh!!

Stopped at Himo Bridge where the 2nd Division base camp was ,the starting point for the left section of the 11th Hull Heavy Battery en route for Kondoa Irangi.

From the border crossing and a bit off piste one gets a good view of the Lateama Reata Nek which hopefully when I have reviewed the digi pics later will give a good impression of this important position. The rest of the afternoon was taken up with beer and re - reading the OH and war diaries along with BBQ pork. now a walk and a beer again.

Will post relevant shots next week. Back to Arusha tommorrow after a sortie to find Kahe Station which eluded me all day today.

Roop

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ororkep

Roop,

Now I understand where your sign on comes from and why it has been quiet on the Artillery posts. Presumably you are following the route by coach or 4 x 4. Was your battery originally horse drawn as it must have been difficult given the terrain you are describing? Might be a good idea to photograph any German headstones if they are near the British ones; there has been some posts lately bemoaning the fact that there is not an equivalent forum in Germany to help in finding their WW1 heritage. Anyway its all very interesting so enjoy your beers, your about 4/5 hours ahead so look out for the mosquitoes.

Regards Paul

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SteveE
Possibly Tanga and Longido next week if there are any special requests.

There's a couple of 25th RF burials in Tanga Cemetery. If you do happen to go there and it's not too much trouble I'd certainly put in a request for photos of the headstones.

If your Tanzanian tour itinerary takes you anywhere near Taveta (1 burial), Kisumu (1), Morogoro (8), Voi (6), Dodoma (1) or Dar es Salaam (82) then there's always an outlet for any other headstone photos ;)

In fact, would it be possible to change your itinerary completely, you're obviously following the wrong column ;):lol:

Have a great time.

Steve

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spike10764

What a trip, hope you'l share some pics with us when you return..... B)

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cockney tone

Roop,

really interesting account, looking forward to seeing some Pic;s when you get a chance,

Regards,

Scottie.

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KONDOA

Chums,

Lunchtime Arusha (late lunch at that).

Yesterday having awoken in Moshi where surprisingly I stayed at the YMCA, yes lets here the jokes!!! No seriously great food and great accomodation with views from the window of Mt Kilimanjaro, not bad, two rooms and meals for 20 quid.

My previous trip to Kondoa necessitated the use of a Toyota Land Cruiser (Daktari type thing) but the trips around Moshi were handled OK by Suzuki 4x4 although not much better than a good saloon.

Paul - The Hull Heavy Battery once formed into the 38th Howitzer Brigade for East Africa was motorised and reliant upon the use of FWD 4x4 trucks and Napier cars. However, that may sound rather good until you realise the terrain and limitations of these vehicles which relied mainly on manpower to keep them moving. Add to that the complete lack of proper roads and bridges that had been swept away by the raging torrents flowing off Kilmanjaro. The 10th Battery RMA had motorised transport but the 12th SA Battery had mules. Very quickly all required animal and motors to keep mobile.

German gravestones will be photographed where possible, especially Tanga where some may remain. Steve, will do all of Tanga cemetary so 25th lads will be done for you. Unfortunately this trip I will not make Morogoro or Dodoma, Dar or Kenya. I too have lads buried in those cemeteries but will get those next November all being well (funds permitting).

Where did I leave off?? Ah Yes ! Kahe.

Well, having breakfasted well I set out from Moshi along the old railway line to the Pangani River and the junction with the old Voi - Moshi line The maps (1916 ) proved confusing as there has been a rather extensive agriculturtal scheme implemented in the intervening 90 years.

So having taken detours to avoid a seriously flooded track (puddles deep enough for Kingfishers to fish in!!) I crossed the railway on several occassions to the point of some confusion. I asked in my fluent (cough) Swahili how far to Kahe and kept being assured by knowledgable locals that it was 5 km, however I did not ask where the 5 km started !! Eventually I found it, a rather scrubby run down village of mud and stick houses and little other merit. Even my beloved beer was absent which added some dampener to this epic endeavor. However, after enquiring further and with some incredulity if this was indeed Kahe I was releived to find the railway and with much delight (which was totally confusing to the locals), I found the station. Given that trains have not stopped or passed here since decades back it was all the more confusing to the assembled village population.

After much photographing and then abortive attempts to force a way out the other side of the village I had to turn back and head the way I had come back to Moshi. Drat you hear me cry!! And why you may ask?? I forgot to photograph the village itself where it may be recalled the two armoured cars roared down the main street and the Punjabis and Rhodesians flanked the meadows besides the now dry river flats. Additional drat is that I believe (in hindsight) that my excursion off piste , and unknowingly had taken me through Store Camp where I had commented upon the army like buildings!!! So the old maps turned out right in the end again but I did not recognise it.

On the way home to Arusha travelled down to the Weru Weru (Weary Willie) river crossing where the battery and Orde Browns column traversed.

That should be enough for now, sorry if I have missed anything, ask again.

Bye the way . had a nice morning at Longido today so will make notes for next submission.

Beer time !!

Roop

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KONDOA

Chums,

The trip undertaken some days past to the border near Taveta has yielded a valuable find.

At Himo River I photographed an old iron bridge purely for the depiction of the original road route through the area. I have since found that the bridge is the original bridge constructed after the retreating Germans blew up the existing one. The remaining steel girder and rivet bridge was originally intended for the crossing of the Lumi River near Taveta but in the event was not used. The damage caused at Himo therefore made the erection of this bridge necessary to implement the further advance of Smut's army. Photos later.

A one and a half hour drive yesterday took me to the Kenyan Border west of Kilmanjaro and to the village of Longido. The only reference picture I have ever seen indicated a few zinc clad buildings on a shallow slope, the same would appear to be the case today with the additon of a mosque.

For the uninitiated, Longido was the first position captured in German territory during the Great War, secondly it was the point at which General Stewart (1st British East African Div) commenced his drive into GEA in early 1916. Part of the plan proposed by General Tighe and endorsed by Smith Dorrien who would shortly be replaced by Smut's.

There is little to see relevant to these events except a terrific landscape and given the observer has some knoiwledge of events one can see the great difficulties that such an advance would present. The advance crossed a vast expanse of scrubby acacia desert before passing into the densely forested slopes nbetween Mt Meru and Kilimanjaro. Al;l along this route there was ample opportunity for ambuish by the scattered German units. The lack of maps and unreliability of local intelligence compounded the problems and timing of htis advance.

Smuts who had set the timetable had expected Stewart to come up behind the German positions in the Taveta Gap area thus in one fell swoop finishing the bulk of Von Lettows force. Stewart hampered by the bush and with some lack of confidence was late and thus the German Force escaped via Kahe down the Pangani.

Interestingly radios were being used at this time for the 1st Division but the mass of Kilimanjaro made these unworkable for a critical period , only the efforts of the RNAS allowed Smut's sat in GHQ at Taveta some inkling of Stewarts progress.

More later, a beer sounds good just now.

Roop

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Stebie9173

Fascinating stuff, Roop.

Enjoy your (well earnt) beer!

Steve.

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cockney tone

Roop,

really enjoying your reports, have a beer on me!

Realise it may be difficult but do you have any pictures you could post please?

Take care of yourself out there,

regards,

Scottie.

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KONDOA

Chums,

Pictures will have to wait unfortunately, I am downloading my digi to a third party laptop and saving to stick. I am not too confident in plugging the stick ito these internet cafe machines and also I need to spend time on proper descriptions for them. Please be patient.

Today having not too much on and being left with a truck fo the day I drove out of Arusha south westwards down the main road that takes most normal tourists to the Manyara Lakes and Norongoro crater. If you get your school atlas out you will see that this is also a possible route to get to Lolkissali which is about 35 miles as the vulture flies south of Arusha.

So after a hearty breakfast I set out and found the tun off the tarmac at Monduli and headed 24 miles across country to the visible mount of Lolkissali. The route is quite spectacular in that the ground rises which gave excellent views of the march route of the 11th Hull and the reinforcing column of Orde Brown and the advance of the mounted brigade in March/April 1916. Kilimanjaro nearly pleased us today but cried shy of showing the snow clad summit, perhaps another day. Lolkissali was a major point of importance in the drive towards Kondoa Irangi. Indeed it had to be captured prior to any move on the latter as it has the only water holes in the area. Five hundred Germans and askaris defended this rocky knoll aginst the SA mounted columns which had left Arusha.

(time up today) more to follow

Roop

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KONDOA

Chums,

So my last missif we captured Lolkissali and thus allowed the advance to Kondoa by DeVenters mounted brigades.

Now after the capture of Kahe, and the consolodation of the line along the Rewu river that that action allowed prior to the rainy season, DeVenters mounted force moved to Arusha where the mountain climate and rains better suited his animals.

Thus informed I visited the Boma in Arusha this last week to see how to fit 6-800 horses into an area the size of a football pitch. Well upon paying 30p entrance fee I was pleasantly surprised to find a bit of history displayed for the benefit of local school children.

The Boma was constructed around 1900 after local tribes became upitty at the missionary zeal and land grabbing of the German interlopers.

Indeed it becomes more than obvious that old Fritz was not over popular after he had deliberately caused starvation and famine to subjigate the area. So the anticipated uprising caused the construction as mentioned of the said establishement which became very useful as stables and paddock in later years.

On display are a few photographs of the Shutztruppen doing drill and some rather interesting prewar pictures of Russian, German and other immigrant families in the area. If you are ever in Arusha it is worth the entrance fee. There is a small bar in the gardens too which, you may by now realise, I discovered sells cold beers!!!

It was from this Boma that DeVenters force sent out first his patrols and then his main force towards Lolkissali.

The battle for Lolkissali was quite heated. The geographical feature stands towering over the Massai steppe with views many miles in all directions. Thus DeVenters force was anticipated as it galloped southwards from Arusha across the waterless tract of semi desert. If it were not for the Boer skill of fighting at close quarters and the tenacity of the troops who were having to fight up a very steep slope , contesting every rock and defile until one section of the German defence fell back.

This was indeed the turning point of the battle as it allowed the attacker access to one of the water springs on the hillside and thus the men and horses were saved. The horses at this time had gone 3 days without water and many had succumbed through exhaustion and sickness.

The artillery also played a part inthis action and had succeeded in wounding the commander who was evacuated that night. The loss of leadership by the German defenders saw morale crumble and when the combined SA force made a general assault on the position the following day the defenders surrendered peicemeal.

Thus the way to Kondoa Irangi , the gateway to the Central Railway was secured.

The day of my visit to Lolkissali was not best chosen for my purpose. It being a Saturday I found the settlement awash with bright crimson, scarlet and multitudinous shades of red as the Maasai held their weekly goat mart. I escaped without buying a goat but it obviously hindered my perambulations in search of ?.

For the last two days I have been kidnapped and dragged screaming to the Ngorongoro Game Reserve on Safari. Despite my best efforts and the entreaties regarding the more important and interesting WW1 subjects I actually enjoyed it and came back in one piece with some good photos too. However , it lacks the hours of pondering and personal involvement of my interest and whilst enjoyable it is not my bag. When you have an older sister with a nice truck though it is sometimes best to keep quiet.

Tanga and the Pangani tommorrow Chums, lets see what we can find enroute. Beer on the horizon as I conclude.

Roop

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SteveE

Roop

Keep it coming.....

All very interesting, even if you do keep following the wrong column :lol:

Enjoy Tanga and watch out for the bees, particularly nasty around there I believe.

Steve

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cockney tone

Roop,

keep it coming, really enjoy your account.

Was lucky enough to holiday in Kenya last year and had a great safari on the Masai Mara, was very pleased as well to get to visit one of the CWGC Cemetries in Mombassa much to the amusement of my cab driver! if I recall they were all Great War Casualties.

Regards and take care out there,

Regards,

Scottie.

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KONDOA

Chums,

Yesterday , was non productive in that I spent much of the day re - reading my OH and other docs in preparation for the Tanga trip. As I have my contemptible old father with me I have broken the trip up somewhat as it is about 333 Km from Moshi and I have been staying in Arusha. So as I write I find myself overnighting again in Moshi at the fabled YMCA where the staff, service and prices really are excellent. Old Contemptible is back there now quaffing warm ale as is the British tradition.

Well having chivvied all from Arusha early this moning I arrived Moshi, before 12 o'clock so was not late for a cooler at lunch. After lunch I had planned to return to Kahe as I have had sleepless nights in properly appreciating this position and the importance to the whole campaign.

Thus fortified with Kilmanjaro ale I set out back the road I had travelled some days past and arrived once again at the old place.

It is now apparent that the Rau, Ruvu, Sollo Ngoni (?) river system draining the lower slopes of Kilimanjaro have been corrupted in the intervening decades by the aforementioned agricultural scheme. So my many forays today in Suzuki through the dusty village streets of Kahe, scattering fowl and endangering precariousy existant mud houses resulted in but a few dry water courses. The region has however been in drought for a number of years which has exacerbated the problems of the river searching project.

To summerise Kahe- The village street plan is much as it was in 1916 and indeed the mapping contained in the OH is accurate and I was able to place myself fairly where the German counter attack took place. What is more difficult without modern maps and much footwork, which would take some considerale time, is the detail of the position, ie river banks, starting positions etc. The agri scheme has also altered the road layouts so one is forever having to retrace tracks to re- acquaint ones bearing etc.

Today then was really a forerunner of further work maybe on another trip next year. I did though get a half decent photo of Kahe Hill at some distance and tommorrow enroute for the Pangani Vally it is hoped to improve on this and additionally capture to film Bauman Hill and Euphorbien Hill, both important positions at that juncture of the campaign.

My objective in the drive to Tanga is really to identify the pinch point in the valley where the mountains , railway and road all converge and where the first serious German defence was mounted and routed by Shepperds force. I shall be on a sharp look out for German Bridge just before Bwiko with the hope that remains of the original bridge have survived, perhaps that is too ambitious?

My next report may be from Tanga, we shall see. Meanwhile Steve can rest assured that all effort will be made to secure your 25th RF photos .

I am also fortunate to have a brief guide of original buildings and features that may remain in Tanga relevant to the November 1914 landings, again we can but hope to fulfill this photo objective given that I really am only in town the one day.

Till next time then chums, I shall snuff the candle and turn in, well perhaps a beer first eh?

Roop

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joseph

Roop,

Good stuff hope your enjoying yourself, don't dehydrate.

Regards Charles

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LF Historian

Roop

Have been reading your saga, well done- great to read something new about what is there now. Hope to hear from you about any of the 25th details when you get back.

Regards

LF Historian

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KONDOA

Saturday 3:30 pm Moshi.

Arrived back from Tanga this lunchtime and must say have over enjoyed the place and intend one day to return to a quite fascinating and charming town.

My journey down from Moshi was very interesting for me, part of the way down to Bwiko (OK Atlas's out boys) followed the route of the right section Hull Heavy Battery who formed part of the force reserve during the advance down the Pangani.

Bwiko was also near Mabrioni where General Shepperd encamped prior to his action at Bwiko and whilst waiting for the arrival of other columns that had penetrated the Pare Mountains.

Bwiko, is at the narrowest confluence of the railway, road and Pangani river and was thus a prime defensive position for Von Lettow although he could not muster a force sufficiently strong to offer all but a rearguard action. Bwiko is also the end of the Pare Mountain Range which to the traveller is visibly obvious in the abrupt conclusion of the steep sided , craggy ridges reminiscent of the British Lake district to some degree and covered with a scrubby, vegetation of thorn and coarse grasses. The lower approach slopes upon which the modern road is established being similarly scrubby thorn , grasses and a preponderence of Boabab trees where the ground suits.Sisal plantations abound and are extensive.

The map once again proved accurate in the main and the course of the road, river and railway remained true throughout. The railway incidently was the one that Von Lettow used to scurry his Field Companies from Moshi to Tanga once word had got out as to the British intentions. Unfortunately this track, much rebuilt during British times, is now derelict and moulders away gracefully along with many other remnants of another age.

After a 6 hour drive on fairly good roads Tanga was reached around 2 pm. A stop was made at Mombo where a goodly lunch of Chicken & Rice was consumed washed down with the ubiquitous bottle opf Killy. Whilst digesting this modest fare I contemplated the Baluchis who had marched the same route some decades past, meeting with machine guns entrenched some two villages prior to Mombo. The 28th Mountain Battery coming into action and removing this threat, and later occupation of Mombo. We drove onward, much refreshed.

Tanga, is my kind of town. The mish mash of houses and colours blending with the multi cultural inhabitants to creat a rich canvas of both interest and expectation. The old colonial houses , steadily yielding to the passage of time , hinting at a more glorious and prosperous past, now sadly but gracefully crumbling. Tanga is compact, coralled by the old railway embankment that formed the German defence in those desperate days of November 1914, yes, almost exactly 92 years ago. I drove directly down the Ras Kazone peninsular in search of a billet for my stay and soon became familiar with the geography which has remained little changed. Where it not for the newer buildings that now inhabit the old rubber plantation lands and a smattering of tarmac on the more important Hospital Road one is carried back to that time; even the humidity played its part during my stay and little relief was gained from the ceiling fan in my room those nights. I felt pity for the lads weighed down by heavy equipment and short of water with the sea to their backs and little relief.

The first afternoon I achieved quite a bit , identifying the main beaches and the Tanga European Cemetrery. The cemetery is a poor monument to our boys; being no more ceremonial than a concrete slab with stones erected therein. I was disappointed and felt somewhat betrayed. It seemed like "out of sight out of mind". I photographed all the stones I could find and especially Steve's men from the 25th. Sadly the old German civilian cemetery beyond the War Graves is in derelict state but again very interesting and telling of a very different age.

Late afternoon found the German Sakarini Cemetery where Tom Prince and his defenders still stand to attention in ghostly silence. The Boabab near which they are buried has grown much larger than at that sad time , but still protects their earthly resting place. Scarily, I found a stone to an Askari, who was buried in 1987, makes you wonder things like that!!

So supper and beers at the Mkonge Hotel, very nice but more pertinent being that it's lawn where one dines is the top of the Beach C shoreline slope. So as I tucked into a rather good prawn curry with naan and rice I thought again of the poor Indian lads who did their best but failed in this chaotic endeavor.

Second day I was out and about early, I was on a mission of great import. Indeed great energies may be required should I be spotted. The Red House which you may recall played such an important part in the landings on Beach A is forbidden territory and much signage and threats are attached to the site for some unkown reason. Photography is strictly forbidden. Not to worry, under the gate at dawn before the town was awake and I had a peaceful reconoitre around this melancholy building. As the sun brightened I looked down onto Beach A with it's high cliffs which had to be scaled by the sickness weakened troops and without overstaying my welcome slipped away again unseen; very happy to have been there but also again saddened by the unecessary dereliction of a fine house.

Tension eased, I nipped further around the peninsular to Beach B and located fairly quickly the eqally grand and steadily decaying Whitehouse, I was by now emboldened by my previous foray so was unconcerned by the chap cleaning his teeth as I clicked away,he provbably thinks I am mad.

From there the signal tower, a newly built replacement, was visitied, from here General Shepperd relayed orders and lalso this was interconnected to the Redhouse by wire . The Rajputs ran out their communication down the main Central road of the peninsular, still there and unchanged. The line stopping at the ditch, the last attained position of many units and the place of death for hundreds. The ditch was being maintained when I arrived, not for memorial pourposes but because it still plays an important part in the drainage of the town. An insignificant but some how sad place.

Having satisfied my quest for the main features of the battleground I sought out the Old Boma. From here it was that the captain of HMS Fox called upoon the town commisar to surrender and also enquired regarding mines in the harbour. Well, unless you search you do not find and thus after many false leads and wrong turnings I found the Boma. Today , much of it is used by an Islamic church/school and is in fair but scruffy order. Next to this however is the infintely more interesting and more derelict building which is unused. Frm the veranda , scattered with broken timber and growing moss, one can look out over the seafront escarpmant at where HMS Fox would lay at anchor. Looking eastwards ne would see the invasion fleet off Ras Kazone. Again, to the local population it is a fairly meaningless building, but if one understands the history it is a wondefully interesting and important building. What a pity so much effort is spent on the safari tourism and not in this town.

As I mentioned beofre the town itself whilst having to survive in a harsh modern economic climate, retains a surprisingly large number of old and spectaclular properties. Other than Georgetown in South America I feel it would be hard to find such a collection. Again unfortunately these ared isappearing. Visit whilst you can.

Tea and Beeer Calls.

Next missif form UK.

Roop

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SteveE

Roop

This thread has been absolutely fascinating, I'm green with envy.

Just out of interest, a couple of questions from your last posting....

1. Did you find (the) German Bridge between Buiko and Mabrione?

2. How was Tom Prince's grave marked, with his English name or as von Prince?

Glad you were able to take care of, and remember, the men of the 25th and looking forward to your next installment although I see it will be from the UK which means this thread will be drawing to a close :( , it's been interesting, to say the least, to have some of this forgotten theatre described so well.

Steve

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KONDOA

Well, I am still in Arusha, awaiting an evening flight back to Blighty, no fever andf bowels intact thus far.

I am still revelling in the trip to Tanga and am already planning next years agenda.

I failed to mention in my previous missif the War Cemetery at Tanga which specifically commemorates the November 1914 burials. I have photographed this best possible and will post some pics later in the week. I am not entirely satisfied with the panel photos though as the sun was terribvly bright. They are legible though in full format.

The other important building still existent in Tanga is the rather grand German hospital which was shelled accidently by HMS Fox and which treated many of the British wounded. again, photos to come. Meinhertzgen also marched up there with his white flag to deliver aid for the men and deliver the apology for the shelling from Aitken.

I did not get a good opportunityy to locate German Bridge as was hoped. The road around Makocheni and Buiko has been remodelled slightly in the intervening years and all I was able to do was gat a general view of where the old road may be. I hope next year to seek out this place and then continue down towards Luchomo etc . to Morogoro and beyond.

Tom Prince has a flat ground marker and he is in frount of his "ranks" as on parade. Hauptmann Tom Prince is correct I belive. I will post photos later and you will get a good view of this tranquil cemetery.

After running into a stray South African in Tanga , I was infromed of a memorial to the SA Mounted Brigade near Arusha and German graves nearby. I spent quite some time yesterday in search of thise but unfortunately failed in this endeavor. The general location is known but the town of Arusha is expanding rapidly and it may no longer be in open country as described. I have left a local acquantaince with the task of locating these for me for future visitation etc. Hopefully we shall be lucky.

My other project which is similarly left as ongoing is the German HQ if it still exists in Moshi, failing that photo archives of same.

Look out for pictures in previous postings from around Wednesday.

Roop

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joseph

Roop,

Look forward to it, Safe journey.

Regards Charles

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KONDOA

First a few pictures from Moshi CWGC Cemetery.

post-3925-1164735746.jpg

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