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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Periscope


kmad
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Hi All,

I have an option to buy a periscope but i am wondering if it is good or not and wanted to know what reproductions are on the market,

looking at this one it is labeled with a tatty paper label with the name "adams" and made in 1916 along with a description on how to use it normally and how to use with binoculars. it is made of timber (light enough construction) and tacked together, with tin plate sliding over the openings, overall colour is a greeny colour and the /I\ is painted on the outside . the 2 mirrors are made of very heavy glass (around 12 mm thick) and the inside is blackened. on the bottom is a bolt sticking out where it can be mounted on to something. it can be folded in half and the overal length is 22.5 inches (as stated on the paper label)

any pointers i should look out for with this, cost is not a lot (20 euro) would you buy or not??

thanking you in advance

Ken

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sounds like one I have. I'd bite his arm off at 20 euros.

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Hi All,

I have an option to buy a periscope but i am wondering if it is good or not and wanted to know what reproductions are on the market,

looking at this one it is labeled with a tatty paper label with the name "adams" and made in 1916 along with a description on how to use it normally and how to use with binoculars. it is made of timber (light enough construction) and tacked together, with tin plate sliding over the openings, overall colour is a greeny colour and the /I\ is painted on the outside . the 2 mirrors are made of very heavy glass (around 12 mm thick) and the inside is blackened. on the bottom is a bolt sticking out where it can be mounted on to something. it can be folded in half and the overal length is 22.5 inches (as stated on the paper label)

any pointers i should look out for with this, cost is not a lot (20 euro) would you buy or not??

thanking you in advance

Ken

Ken,

Adams probably refers to 'Adams & Co' of Charing Cross, London, who I believe made camera's and optical equipment prior to the war. I was looking at something fairly similar on friday, found something in the collection called a Trenchoscope, made by Adams and Co, and consists of a folding piece of wood, two painted brass clips and two mirrors. This one comes in a brown canvas case, although I think there may be some bits missing as I cannot fathom how it could ever be used as a periscope.

If you have a pic of the one on offer, could you post it up so I can get an idea of how to put this one together :D

Cheers,

Barrie

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Sounds perfectly authentic to me. This is the Adams 1915 No.9 wooden box periscope - there was a MkI and a MkII. 20 euros is well below market value - they are not that rare but nevertheless the value is closer to £100. With original canvas case you could expect £150 - £200.

post-569-1162833499.jpg

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Mmmm, now I'm really confused, cos the one we have is nowt like that one :blink:

I think i'll try and get a pic of ours before I head home, otherwise this will bug me for ages.

Barrie

P.S. Having just read that other thread, I have a funny feeling what we have is the ground spike :(

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Ok, here goes - excuse the quality of the pic, in a slight rush. The label on the inside of the case clearly read 'trenchoscope' and Lizars sticker has been put over the original Adams and Co label, although the cardboard box for the mirrors still has the Adams and Co details on it.

The brass clips are the right size to slip over the wooden thing - can't figure out why though, i reckon there should be another wooden bit - though still confused as to what this would accomplish.

post-9547-1162835151.jpg

Any suggestions?

Sorry Ken, not trying to hi-jack your thread, just curious if this is similar to the one your looking at, and if so, how does it work?

Cheers,

Barrie

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Hi ALL

Max P thanks for the photo, that is the one I have ( i bought it this morning in the second hand shop) got it for 18 euro as the shop keeper could not understand why anyone would want it. it is in good condition, as you can see i am a begineer from this on line photo + chat stuff so i will try and take a picture next week when i get back (blooming work always gets in the way!!!!)

Barrie fire away, treads are belonging to us all , knowledge is king as thay say

all the best and good luck hunting out those bargains

ken

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Ken,

At 20 Euros, I say buy the piece.

Later, if you don't want it or if it is a repro you can sell it on - even sold as a repro you'll get more than € 20 for it - so you're unlikely to lose by it.

Tom

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Well done Ken, if he's got any more let me know!!! 18 euros?! :o Goodness me...

Barrie, I think yours is Arthur Adams early pattern (patented Dec 1914) model - there were a lot of variations in trenchscopes besides the more common ones. Many were officier's private purchase of course, as the Army and Navy store etc.

Yours looks complete. Try the spring pieces on each end of the arms with a mirror held in by the clips - simple as that I think.

I've got a few periscopes but that is one I would like.

post-569-1162909096.jpg

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Max,

That worked a treat, thank you very much. What fun we had testing it from under the table :D

Simple, but surprisingly effective!

Cheers,

Barrie

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Hi Barrie,

you see by hijacking you too got some info.

Max sorry no more available. I was looking at the picture and see that the screw at the bottom was for mounting a spike to hold the whole thing in situ.

Thanks all for all the helpful points

regards

Ken

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