Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Real Food Versus Rations


PBI
 Share

Recommended Posts

Question:What would have been a Typical Breakfast Menu for F.M.Haig and His immediate H.Q. Staff,compared to the Breakfast Fare of The PBI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is one of these really irritating things but Haig failed to keep a detailed diary of his breakfasts while in command of the British army. I can tell you that on the evening of 26th August, 1914 he and General Gough had fried eggs and stewed rabbit for dinner. In September of that year he had breakfast at 3 a.m. but, unfortunately, he fails to tell us what he ate. Also in September he conveyed 10,000 British rations to starving Moroccan troops which were very gratefully received by the French General de Maud'huy.

I fully realise that this does not resolve the vexed question of whether he preferred orange or grapefruit marmelade. A question for the more erudite researchers.

Ian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question:What would have been a Typical Breakfast Menu for F.M.Haig and His immediate H.Q. Staff,compared to the Breakfast Fare of The PBI

I would be interested if there were any published accounts of this. The easy answer would be that the Field Marshall would have eaten whatever he would choose to pay for. Officers at all levels tended to have their food prepared by their servants with stuff bought on the open market with money from their mess dues. Some officers were quite well set up, apparently; others, like Byng, had a reputation for being "plain".

As an example of "rations", this is the menu for the week ending November 3rd, 1917 at the Canadian Corps Rest Camp (HILLHOEK).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello PBI,

Here's a 'mock-up' menu of what the 17th Ambulance Train were eating in the Christmas of 1917.

'Potage'

Dinden a l'improvise

'Roti'

Porc de Marles au 'Compris Charbon'

Gigot moutonne au gout rare

Jambon a la Garnere

Legumes

Choux de Brandhoek

Pommes de terres a la Madame Mourier

Chouxs defendus a St. Omer

Pudding de Noel

[sauce Caporel]

Cafe [choix W.A.A.C.]

Fruits

That's a rather splendid selection of Xmas fare, don't you think? Or more a case of wishful thinking. I wonder what Haig was tucking into, besides barking orders at his subordinates?

Kind Regards,

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Holmes covers food reasonably well in "Tommy".

I can also offer you 1/5th Cheshire's 1918 Xmas dinner (officers, of course):-

Hors d'oeuvres des Allies

Potage Quatorze Fevrier

Tomate Neuve Eglise

Dinde roti a la Mode d'Ypres

Farce a la Gommecourt

Sauce Arras

Pommes a la Somme

Petits Choux de lavantie

Pouding de Noel de Cambrai

Oeufs Armistice

Cafe Feenish la Guerre

(source: Subalterns of the Foot: Anne Wolff)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wot, no vegetarian option?

Nigel

Please Sarge... I'm lactose intolerant so I was wondering....

:D :D :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There`s no gain in feeding commanders a less than adequate diet. In fact, it could be argued that the happier they are the better, so feed them well. On the other hand, the thought that Tommy could be eating scraps while the commanders (and their staff) eat cordon bleu doesn`t seem right. What guidance could we offer for a sensible solution? Phil B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QUOTE (Phil_B @ Nov 4 2006, 01:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What`s the significance of Valentine`s Day in Cheshire, JH? Phil B

Phil

For the 1/5th at least, it's the day they left the UK in 1915, rather than anything more fun.

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...