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Sword Scabbards


bcerha
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I have acquired a new scabbard for my P08 Cavalry troopers sword. It is in fine condition externally but internally it is full of grease and dirt etc, so much so that the sword will not fit all the way down inside it. My question is this; does anyone know of a good way to clean out the inside of this scabbard?

It is far too narrow to get a brush or a gun cleaning rod down so I guess some sort of liquid or steam would be good - but I want to leave the inside clean and dry so as not to damage or rust the sword when I place it inside.

Advice Please - any helpful suggestions gratefully recieved!

Many thanks in advance

Regards

David

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Is it packing grease or proper muck and dust? Is it lined in any way? If you are certain there are no wood, cloth or leather inserts then a good soak in degreaser,,, I wont say out loud petrol because of the health and safety responses.

Then make sure it is completely dry by leaving it stood in the airing cupboard for as long as you wife will put up with it..then lightly oil, not WD40 though.

Mick

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David ,

If the blade won't do all the way in it is possible the wooden lining has broken up . Has the scabbard got a removeable mouthpiece on the top , usually a small screw either side .

If so take the mouthpiece out and carefully remove the two part lining , the inside of the scabbard can then be cleaned out .

If the wood has broken up use the remains as a pattern to make replacements . I've successfully used dried out de-laminated ply and waxed it before refitting .

Hate to see swords rattling in a unlined scabbard.

Chris

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Mick and Chris,

Thanks very much indeed - excellent advice and absolutely right. I have taken it apart. However, far from being broken up the wooden lining is in excellent condition overall. Its still in one complete piece (apart from a 3 inch split at the top which can be glued) and whilst its pretty gunky in places I have carefully removed most of that and believe that if its slowly dried out, rubbed over with some very fine sand paper it can be replaced in situ. Should I seal it, oil it (if so with what?)or leave au natural before replacing?

In your opinion is there anything I am saying above that is heresy, unwise or just plain stupid or is it OK to proceed as I describe?

many thanks again for the super fast responses.

regards

David

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Hi David ,

That is good news , I wax mine with Renaissance Wax polish , find it stops build up on the wood and doesn't hurt the blade .

You are not doing anything that wouldn't be done in the service life of the sword , except taking more tender care of it ! .

Chris

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Chris,

Brilliant! I will get hold of said wax and apply as directed. Liner is drying carefully, steel scabbard is ful of 'erm "degreaser" and in a weeks time I will let you know the result!

Many thanks once again

David

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David ,

I use Renaissance Wax on all polished metal , it leaves a polished protective finish that the acid from fingers doesn't go through , also works well on leather .

Have fourteen swords , all polished wth it .

Chris

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks very much indeed - excellent advice and absolutely right. I have taken it apart. However, far from being broken up the wooden lining is in excellent condition overall. Its still in one complete piece (apart from a 3 inch split at the top which can be glued) and whilst its pretty gunky in places I have carefully removed most of that and believe that if its slowly dried out, rubbed over with some very fine sand paper it can be replaced in situ. Should I seal it, oil it (if so with what?)or leave au natural before replacing?

Hi David,

Originally the pine strips were coated in paraffin wax, but I agree with Chris that Renaissance Wax is a much better modern substitute. Congrats on a very good and timely piece of restoration!

John

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