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"Three Sons Killed in Action"


Guest mruk
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These pages make horrendous reading! Another very sad case I found whilst researching yesterday. Thank goodness the appendicitis operation was successful.

Gunncr Ernest Alfred Hendle 2/1792 New Zealand Field Artillery

18/09/1915 died in St George’s Hospital, Malta of Enteric

Private William George Hendle 8/2274 Otago Infantry Regiment

KIA 27/09/1916 in the field, France

Sergeant Leonard Hendle 2/49 New Zealand Field Artillery

KIA 10/04/1918 in the field, France

Private Frederick Walter Hendle 25154 Auckland Infantry Regiment

10/12/1918 discharged

Handwritten note on his file reads: –

Frederick Hendle

returned to NZ 08/10/1918 Un A.S.

Four brothers went on service and three have been killed. Father 61 – not able to work – was a slaughterman. One brother just (?) Home ill.

Recommend indefinite leave.

Typed letter to Brigadier General C.S.Richardson from Sling Camp 28/06/1918: –

My dear Richardson,

With reference to the attached letter from the High Commissioner concerning No.25154, Pte F.W.Hendle, 1st Bn Auckland Regt. This man has not applied to return to New Zealand since reporting to Sling, but he states that he made such an application while at Hornchurch, about a month ago. As far as can be ascertained the statements in the High Commissioner’s letter are correct, and his Battalion Commander recommends this return to New Zealand. He left New Zealand with the 14th Reinforcements, served 11 months France and has been operated upon for appendicitis. His age is 36 and his medical classification B II.

Yours sincerely,

(? ?)

Janice

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  • 1 year later...

A postscript to my original post in this thread and a couple that followed it

I'm not a medal collector,  but today I have bought a 1914-15 Star medal to one of the three Rhodes brothers  who died.

 

Charles Rhodes according to the Bradford Roll of Honour joined the16th Battalion, the West Yorkshire Regiment (1st Bradford Pals), on June 1st 1915. His MIC shows that he landed in Egypt on 22/12/1915. His service record does not survive, but the CWGC record him as having served in the 1st Battalion, maybe he did at some stage, but when he was killed in action in 1918 he was a member of the 938th Area Employment Company, Labour Corps. He and his brothers grew up about a mile and a half from my childhood home, and a few hundred yards from the Greengates War memorial which bears his name and those of the two of his brothers who died in Canadian service during 3rd Ypres. Charles is buried in Etaples, (Al)Fred  is buried back in Yorkshire after dying of wounds in London, and Albert is commemorated on the Menin Gate.

What became of his BWM and Victory medals I don't know.

 

Keith

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4 hours ago, keithmroberts said:

A postscript to my original post in this thread and a couple that followed it

I'm not a medal collector,  but today I have bought a 1914-15 Star medal

 

What became of his BWM and Victory medals I don't know.

 

Keith

 

Careful, that's how it starts Keith.

Mike

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  • 8 months later...

I am late to this thread, but thought the following  might interest some.

Arthur Mather had seven sons and six daughters.  The sons all attended Cheltenham College, and three were killed in action:

John Kearsley, a Regular subaltern in 1st York & Lancaster, near Ypres in February 1915

Ellis, a private in 17th Battalion (Pals) King's Liverpool Regiment, at Trones Wood, July 1916

Robert, a 2nd Lieutenant in 20th Battalion (Pals) KLR, also on the Somme in  March 1918

All three are remembered on Memorials to the Missing.

 

Another brother, a surgeon, served in France  with RAMC (Captain).  Another was a Captain, Indian Army, with service in Iraq and other places, another brother was in the North West Mounted Police in Canada, and another in the Natal Police after serving in the Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War.  These four survived.

 

Daggers

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