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Remembered Today:

Help Needed


Jon6640
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I am trying to research the men from my village who died in the Great War and are remembered on the village War memorial which was erected in 1921.

I have drawn a blank on the following - Joseph Kempson STOKES. I have no regiment but do know the following:

Name Joseph Kempson Stokes

Address 18 Hill Street, Cheslyn Hay

NOK Son of Mr and Mrs Joseph STOKES

Rank

No

Regt

Date of Death 22.11.1920

Age

How

Theatre

Buried CHESLYN HAY CEMETERY

Notes Not on CWGC or Soldiers Died

One year old Joseph STOKES from Cheslyn Hay on 1901 census

Copy of letter sent to Mr and Mrs Joseph Stokes, 18 Hill Street, Cheslyn Hay from their son, Joseph Kempson Stokes. Joseph was injured and sent home in 1918. He died two years later on November 22nd 1920 and is buried in Cheslyn Hay Cemetery.

“Dear Mother and Dad

Just a few lines hoping you are quite well, as it leaves me in the pink. I am at the base at present and do not know when I shall move so make yourselves contented for I quite alright and have never felt better. Sorry I cannot give you any address at present but I shall soon be able to. My word, it is a fair ride over the English Channel and I enjoyed it a treat, it was lovely rocking about on the sea and it was a nice big boat that we rode on.

Remember me to Trot and Wilf and Mary also Aggie and tell them I will write as soon as I am a bit more settled down for it is a bit off traveling from one place to another. Sorry I cannot write much but I am so tired and I’m off to bed.

I got the parcel quite alright at Hartlepool. I think this is the time, more next time I write so goodnight and God bless you all.

From your loving son

Joe”

His death certificate states he died on 22.11.1920 at 5 Hatherton Street, Cheslyn Hay and causes of death 1. Tuberculosis Pulmonalis (acute) and 2. Asthenia (this is a weakening of the muscles) his occupation is listed at a colliery banksman although in brackets it has 'ex Army'.

Ironically a Joseph STOKES from the village which I believe was relative was killed in WW2, was buried in the same village cemetery and is listed on the CWGC.

If anyone can give any help tracing his regiment and number I would be very grateful.

Jon

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Fred,

Thanks, there's no record of 58019 STOKES in the SDGW resource implying that 58019 STOKES came home which lends weight to the idea that it might be him. Excuse my ignorance but would the next step to see if he is Joseph Kempson STOKES be to try and get his service record? What would the absent voters record tell me and how do I get access to it?

Jon

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Hello Jon,

I think you need to get his service records, I am not sure the absent voters list would help you a lot, but maybe other members of the Forum might have other ideas.

Fred

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Fred,

Thanks, there's no record of 58019 STOKES in the SDGW resource implying that 58019 STOKES came home which lends weight to the idea that it might be him. Excuse my ignorance but would the next step to see if he is Joseph Kempson STOKES be to try and get his service record? What would the absent voters record tell me and how do I get access to it?

Jon

Hi Jon,

You only have a 30% chance of finding his service record as most were destroyed in WWII. You have a slightly better chance of finding the record if he survived as many of them are held in WO364 at Kew and the other ones are WO363 which are the burnt records.

See this link:

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalog...tm&lBack=-1

At present you have to go to Kew to view these records.

I'm inclined to agree that this MIC is your man:

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documen...;resultcount=26

The key to all this is the MIC as this will give you a clue as to when he went to the front. If he went in 14/15 he will have a date he entered theatre and where. If he went after 15 e.g. 1916 it will not generally record the date, but I have seen those that do. From the MIC you can generally use the reference numbers to see which battalion he served in the WYR.

However, that also means a trip to Kew.

If you'd like any help or advice give me a shout.

Steve

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  • 7 months later...

Finally tracked him down, it was Pte Stokes from the West Yorks, and after writing a small piece for my local history society's newsletter a family member got in touch and provided the picture in the link below which they thought was Joseph!, thank you Gunners Dream.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...mp;#entry678015

Jon

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May I be so impertinent as to enquire exactly what you propose to do about this possible non-com Jon? I am sure there will be others interested to know as well...

Wishing you the very best of luck with this...

Neil

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Jon

Following Neil's impertinece, may I suggest you contact Terry Denham and take his advice about the likelihood of the causes of death being approved by the MoD for his inclusion on the Debt of Honour Register. Terry will normally make a pretty good call on this and will then be able to recommend a way forward (asuming he reckons there is one). As they don't seem to be relarted to the injury that got hims ent home, it's unlikely to be straightforward to make a link back to his army service (depending on when he was discharged)

John

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Jon

Following Neil's impertinece, may I suggest you contact Terry Denham and take his advice about the likelihood of the causes of death being approved by the MoD for his inclusion on the Debt of Honour Register. Terry will normally make a pretty good call on this and will then be able to recommend a way forward (asuming he rekcons there is one)

John

Neil/John,

Joseph's grave looks like this:

post-14888-1178130842.jpg

Whilst his name is on the memorial his death certificate states his causes of death were Tuberculosis Pulmonalis (acute) and Asthenia which is muscle wastage without muscle loss. I think I might be hard pressed to make a link between his army service and death and whilst his family attibuted his death to the war I don't know how I'd prove it to CWGC's satisfaction. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Also as there are living relatives I would obvioulsy need to liaise with them first.

post-14888-1178131206.jpg

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I think I might be hard pressed to make a link between his army service and death

In truth, that'd be my view. I see no link between an injury in 1918 and the causes of death two years later.

John

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I've had quite a few men approved who died of T.B AFTER discharge (14 to be precise). I guess the best way forward is to see if this man was discharged from the service suffering from the SAME disease that killed him. If so, then it's worth a try... The fact his death certificate mentions his army service helps too...

My gut feeling based upon the fact his name does actually appear on the local civic tribute, is that it's certainly warrants further detailed investigation.

I wish you the very best of luck Jon.

Private 58019 Joseph K Stokes R.I.P - Not Forgotten...

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