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NZ Enlistment dates required


Wayne Saillard
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Thanks Zack !

I look forward to viewing the material being sent by snail mail. Depending on circumstances, I will attempt to complete my detailed Roll of Honour of AIF and NZEF servicemen buried on Malta in time for next Anzac Day.

Needless to say, I will probably also approach a number of other individuals who contributed material to this thread, in response to my request, to request permission to use it.

Many thanks for your generous support,

Regards

Wayne

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Thanks Allie/Wayne for your kind words - appreciated.

As I said I will place further details as I come across them - the following is Charles Everett Stuart Probate file

Note that it is clear from the will that the man’s first name was “Stuart' and not "Stewart."

The following file is three pages long.

PAGE ONE

1407

Supreme Court of New Zealand

Nelson District

I Horatio Everett of Riwaka, in the provincial district of Nelson….

(1) That I knew Stuart Charles Everett of Riwaka in the provincial district of Nelson….and when alive….was resident at Riwaka.

(2) That the said Stuart Charles Everett died in Egypt while on a service with His Majesty’s New Zealand Expeditionary Force on or about the thirty first day of July 1915 as I am able to depose from having received official intimation of the death of the said Stuart Charles Everett from the Adjutant-General of the New Zealand Military Forces whose certificate is annexed and marked with the letter “A.”

(3) That I believe the written document now produced and marked with the letter “B” bearing date of the 15th day of August 1914 to be the last will and testament of the said deceased and that I am the executor therein named.

(4) That I will faithfully execute the said will by paying the debts and legacies of the said deceased so far as the property will extend and the law binds.

(5) That according to my knowledge and belief the estate and effects of the said deceased in respect of which probate is sought to be obtained is under the value of £450.

Signed H Everett

in City of Nelson

Dated 7 October 1915

PAGE TWO

“A”

NEW ZEALAND MILITARY FORCES

Record No 7/194

Certified that it appears by an official telegram received at this

office that No 7/194 SERGEANT

(rank)

STEWART CHARLES EVERETT

(Name)

Of the CANTERBURY MOUNTED RIFLES, New Zealand

(Unit)

Expeditionary Force DIED OF ENTERIC

IN EGYPT

(Place)

on the 31 day of JULY 1915

R N Fraser Capt NZEF

O/C Base Records

Adjutant General NZ Forces

Dated at Headquarters, New Zealand Military Forces, Wellington

This FIRST day of OCTOBER 1915

PAGE THREE

“B”

This is the last will and testament of me Stuart Charles Everett of Riwaka in the Provincial District of Nelson in the Dominion of New Zealand Farmer. I give, devise and bequeath all my real and personal property wheresoever and whatsoever to which I shall be entitled at the time of my death including any moneys due to me from the New Zealand Government or any other sources unto my father Horatio Everett of Riwaka Farmer absolutely and I appoint the said Horatio Everett to be the executor of this my will. In witness whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this fifteen day of August nineteen hundred and fourteen.

Signed Stuart C Everett

Signed by the testator the said Stuart Charles Everett as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us both being present at the same time who at his request in his presence and sight have hereunto subscribed our names as witness.

Noel P Adams Solicitor Nelson

Looks like “H R Harvey” Solicitor Nelson

Marked “B” in the affidavit of Horatio Everett given before me 7 day of October 1915

Signed C Richmond (looks like) “Sill” or “Gill”

Solicitor of Supreme Court

Reference Source

Agency: AAOO

Series: 17072

Accession: W5410

Box/item: 67

Record: 1407

Zack

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Regarding spelling of names, Zack... it's possible that he used both forms fairly interchangeably himself. I see that he was born in NZ, but his family may have been Scottish. (I've no idea - just hazarding a potential devil's advocate guess.) If he came from a Scottish fmaily who spoke gaelic at home, the anglicised version of his name may have just been a matter of what was written down from one time to another.

I cite my Mackenzie relatives as an example. Uncle Alec would sometimes write his name Alexander, Alec or Aleck... and then also Alisdair. The surname changed from one day to the next from Mackenzie to McKenzie to MacKenzie, with MacCoinneach thrown in for good measure. It's enough to drive one batty. No one form can said to be entirely 'correct'.

Allie

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Allie

Quite correct Allie. In this instance I was drawing attention to how he spelled his name in his will as signed by him in comparison to the military file which shows the different spelling of his name. I guess family descendants if any may know the truth.

Zack

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  • 3 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Wayne

I came across in Archives an index book that lists the effects of dead soldiers ex Gallipoli - so some further information on Lieut Vincent Fosbery Nancarrow, 7/688, 8th (South Canterbury) Mounted Rifles for you. His effects on death are listed as:

“Pistol in holster, belt with ammunition case and 2 refills, 2 letter cases, F S Pckt bk, whistle, knife, watch, compass in strap, torch & 2 refills, letters, cigtte holder, safety razor & strop, disc, key on ring, glass & comb.”

Zack

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Sergeant John Philip Roughan 8/275 effects of dead soldiers

Wayne

Some further information on Sergeant John Philip Roughan for you. His effects on death are listed as:

“Wrist watch & strap, rosary, disc, post cards.”

Zack

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Keith-Murray Private Walter Herbert 6/1593 effects of dead soldiers

Wayne

Some further information on Private Walter Herbert Keith-Murray 6/1593 for you. His effects on death are listed as:

“Pipe, 2 medallions – Posted to England Nov 21st 1915.”

Zack

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  • 1 year later...

Wayne

I’ve suddenly realised that while I gave you the probate details for Alexander William Andrew 10/205 I didn’t give his files details – which I will rectify ASAP. In the meantime he enlisted at Masterton on 14 Aug 1914.

Sorry!

Zack

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Wayne

Information (at last) on, Private William Andrew Alexander (10/205) Wellington Infantry Battalion for you –sorry I had overlooked it!!

This archive file is 14 pages of photocopy print out from microfilm. In total there are 5 main documents (1 to 5) of interest with the usual inserts on the original file. Abbreviations are as recorded on the file. This file as for other WW1 files is difficult to read in places.

Overview

William Andrew Alexander was born in Green Island, Dunedin, New Zealand on 6 June 1891. His last New Zealand address was C/O Mrs Diamond, Albert Street, Dannevirke.

William undertook his medical examination on and was declared fit for service in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on 11 August 1914 at Masterton, North Island, New Zealand. He attested on and his service reckons from 14 August 1914.

On enlisting he joined the 17 Ruahine Company, Wellington Infantry Battalion, as a Private with the regimental number 10/205. While he stated that his prior military experience was with the “Dannevirke High School Cadets” he admitted on attestation that he had been rejected as unfit for the military or naval forces of the Crown but the reason why is illegible on the file! (Don’t you hate that – I will see what I can find out!)

His next of kin was his father, David Alexander of Coutts Road, Gore New Zealand.

William was single and a school teacher by ‘occupation.’ Prior to enlisting he was working for the Dannevirke High School Board.

William’s medical examination on enlistment was ‘normal’, and his teeth were described as “top false.” His ‘apparent age’ on enlistment was 23 years and 2 months. He was 5 feet 11 inches tall, weighed 159 lbs, was of dark complexion, grey eyes, black hair and his religious profession was Church of England.

Stowers in his book Bloody Gallipoli (page 276) describes William as attending “Gore School, Southland High School and Otago University (MSc Honours in geology and physics).” His parents are listed as David and Martha Alexander, West Gore. Unfortunately there is no reference note provided for the source of this entry.

William left Wellington, New Zealand on 16 October 1914 on HMNZT No 10 Arawa along with the rest of the Wellington Battalion. He arrived in Alexandria, Egypt on 3 December 1914. While his file doesn’t state he would have been on board the Itonus with the bulk of the Wellington Battalion under the command of the great Lt Col W G Malone when it left Alexandria and travelled on to Lemnos and then to Gallipoli where he would have landed on the evening of 25 April 1915.

William’s file is very clear that on 8 August 1915 he went ‘missing’ - the same day as his military commander Lieut Col Malone was killed probably by friendly fire on Chunk Bair. William was almost certainly the victim of the Turkish bomb attack as described on page 71 of the History of the Wellington Regiment by Cunningham, Treadwell and Hanna and William was admitted to the 16th casualty clearing station with what is described variously on his file as a “gunshot wound to the buttock / bomb wound left thigh.” Chunuk Bair was described “as an absolute charnel house” by those survivors who lived through it! A great book to read on this is No Better Death – The Great War Diaries and letters of William G Malone edited by John Crawford (Reed 2005 ISBN 0790010062.)

William made it to Malta on 10 August 1915 where on 23 August 1915 he died from his wounds. He was buried in the Pieta cemetery.

He was 24 years old.

1 HISTORY SHEET (EF Form No 3A)

Unit: WIB

Rank: Pvt

Surname: Alexander

Christian Name: William Andrew

No: 10/205

Occupation: School Teacher

Religion: C of E

Place of Birth: Green Island Dunedin

Date of Birth: 6.6.1891

Last New Zealand address: C/O Mrs Mrs Diamond Albert St Dannevirke

Last employer: Dannevirke High School

Name, relationship of next of kin (if not resident in New Zealand, insert also name and address of nearest relative in New Zealand): D Alexander (Father) Gore, NZ

Note reads: From Public Trustee Active service gratuity to go to beneficiary (Father) Mr David Alexander, Gore and apparently the war medals to go to same beneficiary.

Service

Country or Troopship: NZ date from 14/8/14 to 16.10.14

Foreign from 16.10.14

Medal action

Stamped MEDAL ACTION COMPLETE

Surname: Alexander

Christian names: William Andrew

Rank on death: Pte

Highest rank held: Blank

Reg No: 10/205

Legatee and address: David Alexander (F)

Nominated next-of-kin, relationship and address Gore

Eligible for the following medals:

1914 – 15 Star

British War Medal

Victory Medal

Reported missing 8.8.15 (not cabled) Died of gun shot wounds received in action Gallipoli

Wounds

Date: 18.8.15

Where soldier located: Dardanelles

Message and remarks: Admin 16th Cas C Stat. Transferred to Base. Bomb wound left thigh

Died of wounds 23.8.15 gun shot in action

Note written: “Died from gun shot wound buttocks Malta 23.8.15 Pieta cemetery. The burial ground at Malta of above name soldier.” Extract from letter file.

PLAQUE AND SCROLL

Soldier’s name Alexander Wm Andrew

Reg No 10/205

Roll No 500122

Scroll despatched (Date) 18 May 1921

Plaque 20 Jan 1922

Recipient and address: Mr D Alexander Coutts Rd Gore

Written down left hand side “Cert posted 27.7.22.”

2 NEW ZEALAND EXPEDITIONARY FORCE (Form No 3) Military History Sheet

No 10/205

Name William Andrew Alexander

1 Service record

Country New Zealand From 14.8.14 to 14.10.14

At sea Transport No 10 from 15.10.14 to 3.12.14

Egypt from 4.12.14

10 Name and address of next of kin: David Alexander, Gore, New Zealand

STATEMENT OF THE SERVICE OF No 10/205

NAME: William Andrew Alexander

Regiment of Corps: Ruahine Company Wellington Infantry

Attested Private 14.8.14

Died of wounds 23.8.15

3 ARMY FORM B 103 Casualty Form – Active Service

Regimental Number: 10/205

Regiment or Corps: Wellington Infantry Btn (17th Ruahine Coy)

Rank: Pte

Name: Alexander, William Andrew

Enlisted (a) 14.8.14

Terms of Service (a) end of war

Service reckons from (a) 14.8.14

Information shown in order as: Date; From whom received; Record of promotions, reductions, transfers, casualties &c active service as reported on Army Form B 213, Army Form A33 and in other official documents; the authority to quoted in each case; Place of casualty; Date of Casualty; Remarks Taken from Army Form B213, Army For A 35 or other official documents:

15.8.15; O/C WIB; Missing; Dardanelles; 8.8.15; B213 5.8.15 (not cabled)

10.8.15; 16th Cas C Stat; admitted 16thg Cas C Stn & transferred to; Base; 10.8.15; bomb in l thigh

25.8.15; Cable Commandant Malta; Died from GSW buttocks; Malta; 23.8.15; Cable

Signed N Fitz Herbert CAPT OC Records Section New Zealand for DAG GHO 3rd Echelon MEF

4 NEW ZEALAND EXPEDITIONARY FORCE (FORM NO 4) MEDICAL HISTORY

Of

Surname: Alexander

Christian Name: William Andrew

Examined On 14th day of August, 1914

At Masterton

Birthplace Town Green Island, Dunedin

Country New Zealand

Declared age: 23 years 2 months

Trade or occupation: School teacher

Height: 5 ft 11 in

Weight: 159 lb

Chest measurement: Minimum, 32 in Maximum expansion 35½ in

Physical development: normal

Small pox marks: nil

Marks indicating congenital peculiarities or previous disease: nil

Approved by F Reid Mackay Medical Officer Capt

Enlisted on 14th day of August 1914, at Masterton

Joined on enlistment Wellington Infantry

Regimental No 10/205

Date: 14/8/14

5 NEW ZEALAND EXPEDITIONARY FORCE ATTESTATION (FORM No 2)

ATTESTATION OF

No 10/205

Name

Regiment or Unit:

Questions to be put to the recruit before enlistment (NOTE recruit responses are also numbered 1 – 18)

1 What is your name? William Andrew Alexander

2 Where were you born? Green Island Dunedin NZ

3 Are you a British subject? Yes

4 What is the date of your birth? 6th June 1891

5 What is your trade or calling? School teacher

6 Are you an indentured apprentice? If so where and to whom? No

7 What was the address at which you last resided? C/O Mrs Diamond, Albert Street Dannevirke

8 Have you passed the Fourth Educational Standard or its equivalent? Yes

9 What is the name and address of your present or last employer? Dannevirke High School Board

10 Are you married? No

11 Have you ever been sentenced to imprisonment by the Civil power? If so, when and where? No

12 Do you now belong to any military or naval force? If so to what corps? Yes Dannevirke High School Cadets

13 Have you ever served in any military or naval force? If so state which and cause of discharge. Yes as above

14 Have you truly stated the whole (if any) of your previous service? Yes

15 Have you been registered for compulsory military training under the Defence Act 1909? If so, where? No

16 Have you ever been rejected as unfit for the military or naval forces of the Crown? If so, on what grounds? Yes illegible phrase

17 Are you willing to be vaccinated or revaccinated? Yes

18 Are you willing to serve in the Expeditionary Force in or beyond the Dominion of New Zealand under the following conditions, provided your services should so long be required: For the term of the present European war and for such further period as is necessary to bring the Expeditionary Force back to New Zealand and to disband it? Yes

NOTE – Your discharge will not be granted before your return to New Zealand unless permission for discharge elsewhere be obtained from the GOC the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

I William Andrew Alexander do solemnly declare that the above answers made by me to the above questions are true, and that I am willing to fulfil the engagement made.

Signature of Recruit W A Alexander

Signature of Witness illegible

Oath to be taken by recruit on attestation

I, William Andrew Alexander, do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to our Sovereign Lord the King, his Heirs and Successors, and that I will faithfully serve in the New Zealand Military Forces, according to my liability under the Defence Act, and that I will observe and obey all order of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, and of the Generals and Officers set over me, until I shall be lawfully discharged So help me, God.

Certificate of Magistrate or Attesting Officer

The above questions were read to the above recruit in my presence. I have taken care that he understands each question, and that his answer to each question has been duly entered as replied to, and the said recruit has made and signed the declaration and taken the oath before me at Masterton, NZ on this 14th day of August 1914.

Signature of Attesting Officer illegible NZSC

If any alteration is required on this page of the Attestation, the Attesting Officer should be requested to make it and initial the alteration.

Description of William Andrew Alexander on Enlistment

Apparent age: 23 years 2 months

Height: 5 feet 11 inches

Weight: 159 lb

Chest measurement Minimum 32 inches Maximum 35½ inches

Complexion: Dark

Colour of eyes: Grey

Colour of hair: Black

Religious profession: English

Distinctive marks, and marks indicating congenital peculiarities or previous disease. None

Medical Examination

Sight: right eye Normal

Sight: Left eye Normal

Hearing: Right ear Normal

Hearing: Left ear Normal

Colour vision Normal

Are his limbs well formed? Yes

Are the movements of all his joints full and perfect? Yes

Is his chest well formed? Yes

Is his heart normal? Yes

Are his lungs normal? Yes

What is the condition of his teeth? Top false

Is he free from hernia? Yes

Is he free from varicocele? Yes

Is he free from varicose veins? Yes

Is he free from haemorrhoids? Yes

Is he free from inveterate or contagious skin disease? Yes

Is there a distinct mark of vaccination? Yes No

Is he in good bodily and mental health and free from any physical defect likely to interfere with the efficient performance of his duties? Yes

Are there any slight defects, but not sufficient to cause rejection? No

Remarks

None

Certificate of Medical Examination

I have examined the above named, and find he does not present any of the causes of rejection specified in the Regulations for Army Medical Services.

I consider him fit for service in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

11 Aug 1914

F Reid Mackay MD Medical Officer Capt

Regards

Zack

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  • 1 year later...

An historic Malta Cemetery photo I came across which people might be interested in seeing.

The caption reads:

At rest, far from home, after duty nobly done: a portion of the Pieta Cemetery, Malta, showing the headstones erected over the graves of New Zealanders and other soldiers buried there.

Source: The Auckland Weekly News, Thursday, September 28, 1916 page 35

post-13900-034158900 1289361396.jpg

Zack

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  • 10 months later...

People might be interested in the following extract from a letter I came across recently from Basil Henry Trim 3/101

“A chatty letter, written as recently as September last, has been received by his parents in Wellington from Private B C H Trim, of the New Zealand Medical Corps. Private Trim left with the Main Expeditionary Force. He was invalided to Malta a while ago, but has now returned to Gallipoli.

Of his impressions while convalescing at Malta, he remarks: "The people here are much superior to the Egyptians, and resemble the Italians in many ways. The women generally are beautiful, and I have not seen prettier girls anywhere. In fact it is hard to tell the difference between the Maltese and some English people. There are a fair population of English or British people there, and they spend most of their time and attending to the sick and wounded in hospital by giving them cigarettes, tobacco, pipes, writing material, etc. They also give concerts at various hospitals two or three times a week, and these entertainments are greatly appreciated by the soldiers. The Maltese people help a lot, too - they cannot do enough for us."

Source: The New Zealand Freelance Friday, November 5, 1915 PG 18

Surname TRIM

Given Name Basil Henry

Category Nominal Roll Vol. 1

Regimental Number 3/101

Rank Private

Body or Draft Main Body

Unit or Regiment Medical Corps

Marital Status S

Last NZ Address Lucy Rd Napier

Next of Kin Title Mrs Caroline

Next of Kin Surname TRIM

Next of Kin Relationship Mother

Next of Kin Address Lucy Rd Napier

Source: Nominal Roll

Zack

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Here’s another interesting connection with Malta.

I've come across this letter published in New Zealand on October 15 1915 from William George Hendle the brother of Ernest Alfred Hendle who died of disease on 18 September 1915 at Malta.

William George Hendle spent time recovering from a wound in Tigne hospital, Malta but unlike his brother Ernest he didn't die there. I wonder if he visited his brother’s grave before he left Malta?

"Private W G Hendle, of New Zealand's Fourth Reinforcements, and a Kaiwarra boy, writes home from Tigne Hospital, Malta, as follows:

"No doubt you've heard before this that I have been wounded - yes, the old Joe Turk got one on me at last. I was wounded on 8th August, and just landed here this morning. I had the best dinner here that I have had since leaving New Zealand.

The papers in New Zealand no doubt have told you what we have been doing lately: how we attack the Turks right along the front. I haven't heard how things went after I left. Up till then the New Zealanders had carried all before them. On our front our company had the honour to lead the attack. We started off at 10 p.m. on the 7th with fixed bayonets and no cartridges and in our rifles at all. We had orders only to use the bayonet whilst it was dark, and to only fire in the daylight, the idea being to avoid hitting any of our own men (who were scattered about in all directions pretty well), and also not to give our positions away to the Turks.

The first trench we charged was only a small affair - an outpost. It was captured before the party I was in got there. Then we advanced up a gulley with Turks on both sides of it all the way up. If it had been daylight we would have been wiped out, I reckon. We next got orders to take a hill on the right of the gulley, from where we had noticed the Turks firing a good deal. It looked an impossible job, the Hill was so steep and was covered with prickly bushes and scrub that thick that we could hardly squeeze our way through.

By the time we reach the top we were well mixed up, different companies and platoons altogether. Canterbury and Wellington men came up from either sides, and we bayoneted a lot of Turks and took a big crowd of prisoners. The Turks never showed fight anywhere when we got close to them with the bayonet. They either surrendered or ran away.

At the next trench we came to I was just behind the officer who was leading. We got one in at one end of the trench without any resistance, and began to think was empty, but when we got around the first traverse we found it was occupied. The officer fired a couple of shots from his revolver, and then ducked back and left me in front. Fancy me being front man with God knows how many Turks ahead of you! I was pretty scared, I can tell you. The officer said, "We will throw a couple of bombs amongst them and then charge. The bombs were thrown, and then we charged, me in front - I couldn't get out of it. But the Turks were more scared than I was, and they turned and fled for their lives. We couldn't get near them with the bayonet.

It was now daylight, however, so we put a few rounds into our magazines and bowled a few Turks over as they were getting away. We advanced to the top of a hill a little further on, and started to dig in. The Turks were pottering at us from ridges on either side of us, and we began to lose a lot of men. After a lot of hard work with my entrenching tool I managed to make a pretty safe possie. Then, just as I sat down to rest, my company received orders to move round to the left. I was moving round, and had just been warned to lie down when I felt a terrible smack on my shoulder. I asked a fellow behind me if he could see any blood on my coat. He said I was bleeding pretty freely, and had a big hole in my chair, so I conclude I must be wounded.

Taking up my coat and shirt, I got another fellow to put my first aid bandage on, left all my equipment in the firing-line, and then made my way back to the first dressing station, had my wound dressed, then set out for the beach by very difficult track down a dry watercourse and a steep galley. I met other fellows wounded making their way down. Those of us who could walk did our best to assist those who were hit in the legs and could not walk very well. It's great to see the way the wounded help one another."

Source: The New Zealand Freelance October 15, 1915 PG 7

Surname HENDLE

Given Name William George

Category Nominal Roll Vol. 1

Regimental Number 8/2274

Rank Private

Body or Draft Samoan Adv & Fourth

Unit or Regiment Otago Infantry Batln

Marital Status S

Last NZ Address Kaiwarra

Next of Kin Title Mrs E A

Next of Kin Surname HENDLE

Next of Kin Address Kaiwarra Wellington

Source: Nominal Roll

8/2274 Private Hendle, W G; date reported 31/8/15 casualty list number 166; 4th Reinforcements

Source NZEF War 1914 - 1918 volume 1 book 1: list of casualties, PG 173

William George Hendle was killed in France on 27 September 1916. Three brothers from a family of six were all killed in WW1.

Zack

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  • 1 year later...

While people are thinking about the question I posed above I wonder why this material was moved from Classic Threads? Perhaps an administrator can explain the rules please?

Zack

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  • 1 year later...

Major Bernard Head .

I am researching this person I am not connected to him or his family in any way but private research.

Does any one know when he enlisted in the royal welsh fusiliers 5th battalion date month and year.

Which ship name did he embark on going to new Zealand which port name he embark on uk and arrive on port in NZ dates would be helpful too.

After coming back from Samoa which ship name and which date and port did leave in NZ and when he arrived in April 1915 in uk which port did arrive at. And what date in April.

Thanks as I already lots about him but lack this part.

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