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Remembered Today:

odd image - can you help?


corinne mills
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Volunteers?;Veteran or National Reserve???

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I think thats just the cut of the tunic, not actually chevrons.

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Not one of Oswald Mosley's men by any chance,

How do you get that?

This is a WW1 period photo. Older men joined a home defence type organisation, something like the WW2 Home Guard.

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Knowing nothing about uniforms, I am hoping that the Forum's uniform experts can enlighten us about the armband and the apparent absence of any badges, insignia. It's probably a daft question, but did 'anonymised' soldiers play any part in the funeral (or vigil afterwards) of the Unknown Warrior?

Mick

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I have seen similar photographs of members of the Volunteer Training Corps, from the early days when they purchased their own uniform, cut and material to suit themselves, including the caps, which may have been made by inexperienced hatters for the military style and pattern.

What is quite clear that the man in question has suffered a recent bereavement, perhaps a son at the front?

Gareth

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Lovely example of one of the varuety of grey/green tunics adopted by the Volunteer Training Corps and worn up to July 1916. The arm band is red with the lettering G.R. in black felt. A clue to which corps may come from a photograpghers mark, as this unti doesn't seem to have adopted on of the many unusual designs of cap badge that were taken into use by them.

They weren't officially recognised by the War Office until July 1916 and although they would eventually adopt khaki the supply of uniforms were slow in coming and you do find photo's of them in mixed dress.

post-7376-1158174606.jpg

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post-7376-1158174606.jpg

Lovely example of one of the varuety of grey/green tunics adopted by the Volunteer Training Corps and worn up to July 1916. The arm band is red with the lettering G.R. in blauck felt. A clue to which corps it is, may come from a photographers mark, as this unit doesn't seem to have adopted on of the many unusual designs of cap badge that were taken into use by them.

They weren't officially recognised by the War Office until July 1916 and although they would eventually adopt khaki the supply of uniforms were slow in coming and you do find photo's of them in mixed dress. The attachment I've added is of a member of Hinckley, V.T.C., Leicestershire, showing a better quality pattern of uniform, with either his three sons/grandsons(?) who appear to be Leicestershire Territorial Cadets.

Graham.

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Graham - thats wonderful detail many thanks

The info on the back of the card reads:

J harrison, Imperial Studio, Pendle St, Nelson

if that is of any use

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How do you get that?

This is a WW1 period photo. Older men joined a home defence type organisation, something like the WW2 Home Guard.

You omitted to quote the last part of my post which qualified the first which was prompted by the arm band. :unsure:

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post-7376-1158182010.jpg

Corinne,

The fact that the photographer is located in Nelson, Lancashire would probably indicate that they had a local V.T.C. unit there, probably called Nelson Volunteer Training Corps. However I'm unfamiliar with the organisation over that way, so perhaps one of our Lancahire members could confirm or deny the existence of such a corps.

The postcard illustration is an indication of how the general public viewed the V.T.C., which pre-dates the view we have of WWII's Home Guard as seen through the BBC comedy programme "Dad's Army".

Graham.

P.S.

Have looked through one of my sources and it appears that there was a Nelson V.T.C., as it eventually became part of the 3/11th Bn, Lancashire Volunteer Regiment in 1916 and eventually the 4th Volunter Bn, East Lancashire Regt, with it's H.Q. at 91 Carr Road, Nelson in 1918.

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You omitted to quote the last part of my post which qualified the first which was prompted by the arm band. :unsure:

Fair point. What I was really trying to say was what did you see on that postcard that said Mosley?

I could have understood it if he had "lightning" flashes as badges, or even the "Maternity" jacket, much used by the RFC, but I couldn't see anything at all Fascist about his uniform. All sorts of people wore brassards.

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