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Remembered Today:

WOUND STRIPE


gary ruck 1
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A "Wound Stripe" was worn vertically,near the cuff of the left sleeve of the uniform tunic;one worn to denote each wound received @ a seperate time.{either made of gold russian lace or brass}see Brass example below:~

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A vertical stripe in gilt brass, about an eighth of an inch wide (that must be 3mm) and a couple of inches long (sorry, haven't got one in front of me) awarded for being wounded (not sure of the exact criterion but I should imagine a wound requiring evacuation beyond the Regimental Aid Post and at least into the Brigade system, no prizes for being stoical and returning to duty, perhaps). No doubt some one will clarify. One award for each instance of wounding and when this happens they are worn in parallel very close to each other.

Previous post:http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?s=&showtopic=58300&view=findpost&p=506433

They were secured to a backing plate worn underneath the cloth of the tunic

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Many thanks for the help. Two further questions occur to me

Did the wound have to be of a certain severity to qualify and is there any significance to some wound stripes being of gold lace and some of brass?

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There were no "Degrees" of Wounds {Unlike The German Wound Badges which were issued in 3 different classes}

There is no apparent differentation betwixt Lace & Brass,The Lace tended to be worn earlier on,the Brass being more durable came in later;as it stood up to the rigours of trench life more readily,

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There were no "Degrees" of Wounds {Unlike The German Wound Badges which were issued in 3 different classes}

There is no apparent differentation betwixt Lace & Brass,The Lace tended to be worn earlier on,the Brass being more durable came in later;as it stood up to the rigours of trench life more readily,

Thanks once again for the explanation

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A wound stripe qualified the wounded soldier for a gratuity of about £100.

wig

Not heard that one before! What is your source? I think this would have bankrupted the country if true!

Regards

Steve

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Picked it up in a memior of a Sherwood Foresters officer wherein he discusses the paucity of the gratuity with a fellow officer - "Four men in Flanders" by A.a. Dickson (privately published by his family)

wig

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