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Great Grandfather uniform identification


rixensart

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post-14704-1156950495.jpgI have now attached a photograph of my Great Grandfather, Richard McLaughlan seated centre with the rank of sergeant. I'm not sure where or when this photo was taken. Is there anyone who can help to identify his regiment, from this picture. Could the soldier Standing on the right give an indication of the location?

Bill.

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Hello peock

For the obvoius reason of the uniform of the soldier on the right, the photograph suggests the East Africa campaign.

The only MIC that I can find for a Serg(j)eant R McLaughlan is a RSM in the RGA.

Kondoa is an expert on the East Africa campaign so he might be able to provide a lead.

regards

Mel

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Hello peock

For the obvoius reason of the uniform of the soldier on the right, the photograph suggests the East Africa campaign.

The only MIC that I can find for a Serg(j)eant R McLaughlan is a RSM in the RGA.

Kondoa is an expert on the East Africa campaign so he might be able to provide a lead.

regards

Mel

Many thanks Mel,

Pls excuse my ignorance but what is MIC and how do I access it. Also RGA? I believe that my Grt Grandad did finished his service with the rank of RSM. Apparently he died a few years after WW1 from injuries received from a fall from a platform while supervising native troops burying war dead.

Regards,

Bill

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Hello Bill

The Medal Index Card can be downloaded on line from the National Archives here:

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documen...p;resultcount=1

RGA = Royal Garrison Artillery

Do you have any further information at all? A snippet could lead to a confirmed identification.

Regards

Mel

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Just thought I'd drop-in and take a look at this post, and the foreign chappy actually looks as though he's Egyptian Army, rather than an Askari. Can't really make out the capbadge in the glengarry, although it looks like Royal Scots at this distance.

Graham.

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Graham

A timely interception! I didn't even notice the glengarry :o - I though that it was a buffon :P

I still cannot locate a MIC for a Serjeant R McLaughlan other than the RSM for the RGA.

Bill, did your GG have any other names? Is Richard definitely his first name?

regards

Mel

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Hello,

What a great photo. The 'Local' Soldier does look to me to be a member of the Egyptian Army. The chap seated looks like he is wearing a Royal Scots Cap badge. As he is wearing a Plain Glengarry hat. ie without dicing, he may be a Member of the 4th or 5th Battalion, Queen's Edinburgh Rifles, Royal Scots. They fought at Gallipoli and were in Alexandria for a time. Is there a family connection with Edinburgh?

Regards,

Stewart

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Hi Mel,

Thanks for that.The photo is really all I have to go on to establish his regiment. He did live in Glasgow and died there, I believe, in the early 1920's, which would suggest a Scottish regiment. Someone else has suggested that the native soldier in the photo with the Tommy Cooper hat could be Egyptian.

Regards,

Bill.

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Hello,

What a great photo. The 'Local' Soldier does look to me to be a member of the Egyptian Army. The chap seated looks like he is wearing a Royal Scots Cap badge. As he is wearing a Plain Glengarry hat. ie without dicing, he may be a Member of the 4th or 5th Battalion, Queen's Edinburgh Rifles, Royal Scots. They fought at Gallipoli and were in Alexandria for a time. Is there a family connection with Edinburgh?

Regards,

Stewart

Hello Stewart,

No connection with Edinburgh that I'm aware of. He lived in Glasgow and was from Irish origin.

Regards,

Bill.

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:) Hello,

If he lived in Glasgow, he may well have been in the HLI. There capbadge is very similar to the Royal Scots.

Stewart :rolleyes:

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Looks like Royal Scots certainly possibly a T F bn.

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If it is Royal Scots then it could be 1/4, 1/6 or 1/7 TF Battalions with possibly the 1/5 that were in transit in Egypt........ but there is still no Richard McLaughlan that a MIC can be tied to :blink:

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Hi Bill,

This may be a stretch but do you think his last name could have been spelled differently (or misspelled in his service records)? I found the following listing in CWGC but I do not find the corresponding MIC for this man in NA search at all. This might also be his uniform (possibly Tyneside Scottish which was raised under Northumberland Fusiliers). Probably nothing more than a shot in the dark but thought I'd mention it.

Name: McLACHLAN, RICHARD

Initials: R

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Serjeant

Regiment/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Unit Text: Depot

Age: 46

Date of Death: 19/03/1921

Service No: 4257993

Additional information: Son of John and Catherine McLachlan; husband of Annie Smith McLachlan, of 37, Muslin St., Bridgeton, Glasgow. Born at Glasgow.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: P. 3043.

Cemetery: GLASGOW WESTERN NECROPOLIS

Good luck,

Jane

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Bill,

In my research of the 4th Highland Mountain Brigade, RGA (TF), which fought two of its three batteries at Gallipoli, I have found two items which might help you.

1) I have seen many photos taken in Egypt of 4th HMB members which are very similar to yours. My gunners got to know the Gurkhas well at Gallipoli as well as other 'exotic' troops and took several photos with them. As is still done by soldiers away from home, photos were taken with many groups that meant something to the soldier at the time. That might have a great story behind it.

2) In compiling a Nominal Roll, I have found that very similar names were spelled in subtly different ways and McLaughlin was one. Try as many variants as you can (McLaughlin, McLauchlan, McLachlan, Maclachlan, etc.) and always try Mc and Mac separately.

Best of luck,

Mike Morrison

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Hi Bill,

The soldier on right looks very much like Sudanese.

During 1920 there was great unrest in Egypt, in Cairo riots with loss of life were common, British Troops were sent out to assist the Police with the unrest. I believe they were identified as the 'Egyptian Expeditionary Force.

Troops were also at Khartoum, my father's regiment the Munster Fusiliers was part of the British Force.

Perhaps this could be another subject for your research.

Cheers,

James.

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Going back to Janes(ButlerYank) post I wonder if the Richard McLachlan in question was 1481 Cpl Richard McLachlan, Highland Light Infantry, who was later renumbered 280094, and he transferred to the Northumberlands as 98707 Cpl Richard Mclachlan. This lad started life as an HLI Territorial, who I believe recruited from Glasgow, he may have signed on in 1919 hence the new regular army number 4257933 which was issued in late 1920.

Graham.

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  • 1 month later...
Hi Bill,

This may be a stretch but do you think his last name could have been spelled differently (or misspelled in his service records)? I found the following listing in CWGC but I do not find the corresponding MIC for this man in NA search at all. This might also be his uniform (possibly Tyneside Scottish which was raised under Northumberland Fusiliers). Probably nothing more than a shot in the dark but thought I'd mention it.

Name: McLACHLAN, RICHARD

Initials: R

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Serjeant

Regiment/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Unit Text: Depot

Age: 46

Date of Death: 19/03/1921

Service No: 4257993

Additional information: Son of John and Catherine McLachlan; husband of Annie Smith McLachlan, of 37, Muslin St., Bridgeton, Glasgow. Born at Glasgow.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: P. 3043.

Cemetery: GLASGOW WESTERN NECROPOLIS

Good luck,

Jane

Hello Jane, :D:D

Sorry for the delay in replying, Ive been traveling quite a bit recently.You've made my day. Your "shot in the dark" has certainly paid off! I'm sure we have the same man, as he was married to Annie Smith Mc Laughlan. I'm a bit of a novice at this research. What is CWGC?

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Hello Jane, :D:D

Sorry for the delay in replying, Ive been traveling quite a bit recently.You've made my day. Your "shot in the dark" has certainly paid off! I'm sure we have the same man, as he was married to Annie Smith Mc Laughlan. I'm a bit of a novice at this research. What is CWGC?

Many thanks for your help on this.

Regards,

Bill.

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Going back to Janes(ButlerYank) post I wonder if the Richard McLachlan in question was 1481 Cpl Richard McLachlan, Highland Light Infantry, who was later renumbered 280094, and he transferred to the Northumberlands as 98707 Cpl Richard Mclachlan. This lad started life as an HLI Territorial, who I believe recruited from Glasgow, he may have signed on in 1919 hence the new regular army number 4257933 which was issued in late 1920.

Graham.

Hi Graham,

I'm sure I'm on to something now thanks to Jane's information. My great Grandfather was definately married to Annie Smith McLaughlan, from Bridgeton Glasgow, so I'm certain we have the same man. I would gratefull for any other help or advice you may be able to give me.

Best regards,

Bill.

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