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Remembered Today:

2Lts MAC HAFFIE and MC KERGOW, RFC


Cnock
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Hello,

Who could give me more info concerning

2Lt. John MACHAFFIE or MAC HAFFIE,

2Lt. Robert MC KERGOW or MCKERGOW,

both were kia 21/9/1917

Thanks,

Regards,

Cnock

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Surname McKERGOW

Firstname Robert Dudley Wilson

Service Number

Date Death 21/09/1917

Decoration

Place of birth

Other (5/Dgn. Gds.).

SNWM roll ROYAL FLYING CORPS.

Rank 2/Lt. (T/Lt.)

Theatre of death Unknown

Surname MacHAFFIE

Firstname John

Service Number

Date Death 21/09/1917

Decoration

Place of birth

Other (Gen. List).

SNWM roll ROYAL FLYING CORPS.

Rank Temp. 2/Lt

Theatre of death Unknown

Dolphin may/will have more details.

Aye

Malcolm

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Cnock

The two airmen from No 29 Sqn RFC, 2Lt John MacHaffie (from Oakville, Ontario) flying Nieuport 27 B6765 and 2Lt Robert Dudley Wilson McKergow (from Twineham, Sussex, and formerly 5th Dragoon Guards) flying Nieuport 27 B3634, died when their aeroplanes collided near Ypres on 21 September 1917.

No 29 Sqn was based at Poperinghe aerodrome at the time.

I hope that this helps

Gareth

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Hello Gareth and Malcolm,

Thank You very much.

This indeed helped a lot.

Regards,

Cnock

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LG 4-7-1917

ROYAL FLYING CORPS.

Mil. Wing.—The undermentioned appts. are made: —

Flying Officers.—

13th June 1917.

Temp. 2nd Lt. (on prob.) J. Machaffie, Gen. List.

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveVi...;selHonourType=

LG 2-10-1917

ROYAL FLYING CORPS.

Mil. Wing.—The undermentioned appts. are made: —

Gen. List.—

The undermentioned temp. 2nd Lts. (on prob.) are confirmed in their rank: —

J. Machaffie.

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveVi...;selHonourType=

Steve.

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Steve,

Thank You for the additional info.

Regards,

Cnock

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Hi Thouight I recalled the name, medals sold at Auction four years ago:

27 Jun 02

Collection: A Fine Collection of Medals to Officers Who Died During The Two World Wars

Category: A Fine Collection of Medals to Officers Who Died During The Two World Wars

Lot No: 1210

Description: Family group:

Pair: Second Lieutenant (Pilot) J. MacHaffie, No. 29 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, killed in action on 21 September 1917

British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut.); together with memorial plaque (John MacHaffie); Canadian Memorial Cross, G.V.R. (2/Lieut.); and a superb studio portrait of recipient in uniform, in a most attractive oval mahogany frame, 27 c.m. by 32 c.m

Three: Captain R. E. MacHaffie, Canadian Army Service Corps, formerly 2nd Canadian Divisional Artillery Park

1914-15 Star (2571 Dvr., 2-Can. D. A. Pk.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt.); together with a superb studio portrait of recipient in uniform, this in an identical frame to that above; one other photograph of recipient in uniform with his sister; a hand coloured caricature, entitled ‘Xmas Eve Alone in London!!!’; and a Canadian Red Cross Society Medal, in silver-gilt and enamels, reverse inscribed ‘Elizabeth MacHaffie’, generally nearly extremely fine (9) £500-600

Footnote: John MacHaffie was born at Brandon, Manitoba on 19 October 1897, and educated at St. John’s College Boys School, Winnipeg, and Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ontario. He was commissioned in the rank of Lieutenant into the Winipeg Rifles in January 1916, subsequently being attached to the 234th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, with whom he proceeded overseas.

In January 1917, he resigned his commission with the Infantry to join the Royal Flying Corps as a Cadet, and the following May was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant, R.F.C. In July he proceeded to France, where he joined No. 29 Squadron. He was killed in action on 21 September 1917, whilst flying a Nieuport, and is buried at Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Belgium.

The following is extracted from The British Roll of Honour, Empires Heroes: ‘His Commanding Officer wrote to Mr McHaffie: “He was shot through the head in an air fight, and killed instantaneously. He had done most gallant work whilst with his squadron, and was one of its most popular members...”

Lieut. MacHaffie’s brother wrote home as follows: “While returning with his squadron from the days stunt a Gotha appeared. John and another officer turned and attacked it... A baby Nieuport machine is a single seater and armed with one gun... A Gotha has a crew of three, and three guns mounted on swivels... The fight therefore was hopelessly one-sided. John was a Scout Pilot, flying a baby Nieuport and had been fighting almost daily for six weeks. He was shot through the head by the Gotha gunner.”

The Army Commander, General Plumer, in a letter congratulating the R.F.C. Squadron as a whole concluded with the following words: “I don’t want to be invidious when all did so well, but I would like to congratulate ..., MacHaffie, ..” Then followed five other names of the 29th.’

The account of MacHaffie’s death in this contemporary source is somewhat at odds with his entry in Airmen Died in The Great War 1914-1918, which suggests that MacHaffie died when his plane collided with another machine of 29 Squadron, flown by 2nd Lieutenant McKergow, both pilots being killed.

Estimate: £500-£600

Hammer Price: £720

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Just to make the story even more confusing is a line that Chas Bowyer wrote in VOL2 NO4 1971 Cross and Cockade on the history of Number 29 Squadron:

"The following day [21/09/17] brought a double tragedy when 2/Lts R D W McKergrow and J MacHaffie both died in accidents on their own airfield."

Steve

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Hello,

I still go for the anwer given by Dolphin.

If MacHAFFIE and MCKERGOW had died on their own airfield, they would have been buried near Poperinge.

Both are resting side by side at Reservoir Cemetry at Ypres, also an indication they died in the same action.

Regards,

Cnock

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  • 1 year later...

From Astride Two Centuries, The Life of Bob McKergow by Peter McKergow. Peter was Lt. R.D.W. (Dudley) McKergow's much younger (Dudley b. 1898, Peter b. 1921) brother. Bob was their father.

Pg 135:

Dudley's CO wrote to his father the day after he had been killed, telling him the circumstances.

29 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps

BEF,

France

Dear Col. McKergow:

It is with the deepest regret that I have to write and tell you that your son was killed yesterday. He was engaged in a fight in which one of our machines was shot down and fell on to your son's machine. I saw the doctor who was on the spot and he told me that he was killed instantaneously.

I went to his funeral yesterday and he was buried by the side of the other officer in the English Military Cemetery at Ypres. The map reference of which is 1;40,000 Sheet 2817B2.2.

Your son was one of the most popular members of this Squadron and had done very gallant work during the short time he was with us. Please accept the deepest sympathy from the whole Squadron in your great loss.

Yours sincerely,

Charles M. A. Chapman

Major

Below are MacHaffie's and McKergow's graves together as Cnock mentioned (thanks for photo Forumite Jon Miller).

Chris

post-1571-1192861497.jpg

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Hi Chris,

Thanks for the additional info!

Regards,

Cnock

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  • 4 years later...

I am new to forum & came across this old post re John Machaffie & Dudley McKergow. So thought I would add my bit I do have a photo of John Machaffie which I will dig out and add later.

From RFC Crash report 21st September 1917

report for each plane

Type 27 Nieuport Scout (noB6765) {Lt Machaffie} & (no3634) {Lt KcKergow} Left aerodrome at 12.45pm Wrecked about 2.15pm Cause collision in the air.at sheet 28 17A central

Andy

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  • 2 weeks later...

Andy:

Thanks for posting the pic of MacHaffie. It's nice to put a face to a name.

Welcome to the Forum.

Chris

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Andy,

thanks for the foto!

regards,

Cnock

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Second Lieutenant John Machaffie was the eldest son of William A. Machaffie Esq. a banker & Mrs Machaffie daughter of Colonel John Sydney- Smith & granddaughter of John Sydney-Smith, a surgeon on the Duke of Wellington’s Staff at Waterloo. Later this officer went to Canadian 1830 where he died whilst fighting a cholera epidemic in Toronto in 1834. Lt. Machaffie’s father had also seen service during the North West Rebellion in 1885. Johns elder brother’ Ralph Edie Machaffie enlisted in 1914 with the 1st Canadian Expeditionary Force & was commissioned in 1916.

Born at Brandon, Manitoba on 19th October 1897 John Machaffie received his education at St John’s College Boy’s School Winnipeg & Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ontario.

In January 1916 took his turn to serve the King, he was appointed Lieutenant in the 90th Battalion, Winnipeg Riffles (Canadian Militia), in May of the same year, he was attached to the 234th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force with whom he proceeded overseas.

In January 1917 he resigned his commission with the Infantry to join the Royal Flying Corps as a flying cadet. On completion of training & as 2nd Lt in July he proceeded to France where he joined 29th Squadron (29th Squadron had been formed at Gosport Hampshire in November 1915).

From Squadron records in of the period the following combat accounts of John Machaffie survive.

16th AUGUST 1917 .am 2-plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty ground patrol. “While on ground patrol over Zonnebeke at 7am with 2/Lt. Hilton, I saw 3 E.A. (emery aircraft) above us. They dived below us. I dived at the nearest and fired 20 rounds into him at 75 yards range. He went down through the barrage, under control.

At 7.20am I saw 2 E.A. over our line. I attacked the nearest and fired 20rounds at 50 yards range. He dived away east, and I lost sight of him.

I then fired the remainder of my ammunition into enemy trenches, from about 200 ft.”

Summary by Major C.M.A. Chapman O.C. No 29 Squadron RFC

“2 E.A. driven off, & enemy trenches attacked by 2/Lt. Machaffie. Two combats – indecisive”.

16th AUGUST 1917 .pm 4 plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty ground targets. “I fired half a drum into trenches near Menin Road, & saw the troops run into shelter. I then fired the remainder of my drum into the chateau. When changing drums I saw a two-seater E.A. south of Polygon Wood at 1000 ft. I dived & fired 40 rounds at him 100 yards range, but in climbing to remedy a gun stoppage I lost sight of him.”

Summary by Major C.M.A. Chapman O.C. No 29 Squadron RFC

“Château, ruined house, wood, cross roads, church & two-seater E.A.combat indecisive.”

20th AUGUST 1917 .am 4 plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty

Ground Patrol. “While on Ground Patrol just South of Houthulst Forest at 2000ft I saw a green E.A. two-seater. I dived & fired half a drum at 50 yards range. His observer fired at me, I was also attacked by an Albatross Scout. I zoomed up into the clouds & dived on the Scout and fired the rest of my drum at him, but observed no result.

After changing drums I saw a party of about 70 enemy troops by the side of the Poelacappelle- Westroosbeke Road at 10.40 am. I dived on them & fired a drum at 500ft to 50 ft, & they scattered. I zoomed up & changed my drum & fired another 50 rounds from the same range at them, as they had gathered together again. They scattered. I was then attacked by an Albatross Scout, & after I had fired one round at him my gun jammed. So I returned.

I saw an E.A. two –seater crashed by 2/Lt. De Fontenay just East of St. Julien at 10.30 am”.

On the next day

From R.F.C Crash Report. On 21st September 1917 John Machaffie left his aerodrome at 12.45pm in a Type 27 Nieuport Scout No B6765 on another patrol with at least one other Nieuport of 29 Squadron flown by Lieutenant Dudley McKergow. The next record of the pair was that both planes were located crashed at around 2.15pm at Sheet 28 1 7 A central, after a mid air collision. Both men were killed. The planes were completely destroyed indicating impacted at high altitude. No record of fire.

There is also further information written by his Commanding Officer who wrote to John’s father: -

“ He was shot through the head in an air fight & killed instantaneously. He had done most gallant work whilst with this Squadron, & was one of the post popular members. Please accept the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers & myself in your great loss. I went to his funeral yesterday, and he was buried in the English Cemetery at Ypres, by the side of another officer of his Squadron.”

His brother Ralph also wrote home: -

“ Whilst returning with his Squadron from the day’s stunt a Gotha appeared. John & another officer turned and attacked it. A baby Nieuport Machine is a single seater & armed with one gun. A Gotha has a crew of three & three guns mounted on swivels. The fight therefore was hopelessly one sided. John was a Scout Pilot flying a baby Nieuport & fighting almost daily for six weeks. He was shot through the head by the Gotha gunner.”

McKergow Robert Dudley Wilson, 2nd Lieutenant, 5th Dragoon Guards attached to Royal Flying Corps (R.F.C.)

Dudley was the son of Lieutenant Colonel R. W. McKergow, OBE, M.F.H. and Mrs. J. E. McKergow, of Twineham Grange, Twineham, Sussex. He was killed in action 21st September 1917. Age 19. )

The following report appeared in ‘The Mid-Sussex Times’ October 2nd, 1917:-

LIEUTENANT D. W. McKERGOW KILLED. - Much sympathy will be extended to Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. McKergow, (Queen's Own) Royal West Surrey Regt, and Mrs. McKergow, of Twineham Grange, in the bereavement they have been called on to suffer by the death, in action on September 21st, of their elder son, Lieutenant Dudley Wilson McKergow of the Dragoon Guards (attached Royal Flying Corps). Born February 13th, 1898 and educated at Rottingdean School and Uppingham, deceased entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in May, 1915, and was gazetted to the Dragoon Guards on October 2Oth, 1915. He joined the R.F.C. as an observer on September 13th, 1916, and served four months on the Continent, returning to England to obtain his Pilot's certificate. He went back to France on August 11th last and his death occurred whilst he was flying his Commanding Officer writes " Your son was on of the most popular members of this squadron, and had done very gallant work during the short time he was with us."

The following is taken from the book 'Astride Two Centuries' The life of Bob McKergow' by Peter McKergow pub. 1999

(Letter home from Dudley dated September 18th, 1917.)

Many thanks for your letter dated 14th. I am still in the land of the living as you see.

We had a terrific scrap yesterday. Four of us against 8 Huns, and Chapman shot one down out of control. We fought for about ten minutes, then several of us put ourselves out of control and got away with the assistance of clouds. One persistent Hun followed me down the clouds and got on my tail firing from about 50 yards, but I managed to shake him off by diving into another lot of clouds and steering by compass. I had four holes in my top plane but was not shot about any more than that, which goes to prove that these particular Huns were rotten shots, as we were fighting to great disadvantage from start to finish........ There is no more news at present so I will say goodbye. Love to all.

With much love from, Dudley

This was Dudley's last letter for on September 25th, the Bolney Post & Telegraph Office received a telegram from the War Office, which was immediately taken to Twineham Grange by a boy on a bicycle. It read:

Deeply regret to inform you Lt R.W.D McKergow 5 Dragoon Guard attached R.F.C 29 Squadron was killed in action September twenty first. The Army Council expresses their sympathy.

Secretary, War Office

Dudley's CO wrote to his father the day after he had been killed, telling him the circumstances.

“29 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, BEF., FRANCE.

Dear Col. McKergow

It is with deepest regret that I have to write and tell you that your son was killed yesterday. He was engaged in a fight in which one of our machines was shot down and fell on to your son's machine. I saw the doctor who was on the spot and he told me that he was killed instantaneously.

I went to his funeral yesterday and he was buried by the side of the other officer in the English Military Cemetery at Ypres. The map reference of which is 1; 40,000 sheet 2817B2.2.

Your son was one of the most popular members of this Squadron and had done very gallant work during the short time he was with us. Please accept the deepest sympathy from the whole Squadron in your great loss.

Yours sincerely, Charles M A Chapman, Major.”

We will never know the full details of these two pilots deaths or the exact details of why these two planes collided but in recording this here will bring their memory to a wider group

details also taken from articles on the internet facts from nation archives & items I own

Second Lieutenant John Machaffie was the eldest son of William A. Machaffie Esq. a banker & Mrs Machaffie daughter of Colonel John Sydney- Smith & granddaughter of John Sydney-Smith, a surgeon on the Duke of Wellington’s Staff at Waterloo. Later this officer went to Canadian 1830 where he died whilst fighting a cholera epidemic in Toronto in 1834. Lt. Machaffie’s father had also seen service during the North West Rebellion in 1885. Johns elder brother’ Ralph Edie Machaffie enlisted in 1914 with the 1st Canadian Expeditionary Force & was commissioned in 1916.

Born at Brandon, Manitoba on 19th October 1897 John Machaffie received his education at St John’s College Boy’s School Winnipeg & Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ontario.

In January 1916 took his turn to serve the King, he was appointed Lieutenant in the 90th Battalion, Winnipeg Riffles (Canadian Militia), in May of the same year, he was attached to the 234th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force with whom he proceeded overseas.

In January 1917 he resigned his commission with the Infantry to join the Royal Flying Corps as a flying cadet. On completion of training & as 2nd Lt in July he proceeded to France where he joined 29th Squadron (29th Squadron had been formed at Gosport Hampshire in November 1915).

From Squadron records in of the period the following combat accounts of John Machaffie survive.

16th AUGUST 1917 .am 2-plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty ground patrol. “While on ground patrol over Zonnebeke at 7am with 2/Lt. Hilton, I saw 3 E.A. (emery aircraft) above us. They dived below us. I dived at the nearest and fired 20 rounds into him at 75 yards range. He went down through the barrage, under control.

At 7.20am I saw 2 E.A. over our line. I attacked the nearest and fired 20rounds at 50 yards range. He dived away east, and I lost sight of him.

I then fired the remainder of my ammunition into enemy trenches, from about 200 ft.”

Summary by Major C.M.A. Chapman O.C. No 29 Squadron RFC

“2 E.A. driven off, & enemy trenches attacked by 2/Lt. Machaffie. Two combats – indecisive”.

16th AUGUST 1917 .pm 4 plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty ground targets. “I fired half a drum into trenches near Menin Road, & saw the troops run into shelter. I then fired the remainder of my drum into the chateau. When changing drums I saw a two-seater E.A. south of Polygon Wood at 1000 ft. I dived & fired 40 rounds at him 100 yards range, but in climbing to remedy a gun stoppage I lost sight of him.”

Summary by Major C.M.A. Chapman O.C. No 29 Squadron RFC

“Château, ruined house, wood, cross roads, church & two-seater E.A.combat indecisive.”

20th AUGUST 1917 .am 4 plane patrol Nieuport Scouts duty

Ground Patrol. “While on Ground Patrol just South of Houthulst Forest at 2000ft I saw a green E.A. two-seater. I dived & fired half a drum at 50 yards range. His observer fired at me, I was also attacked by an Albatross Scout. I zoomed up into the clouds & dived on the Scout and fired the rest of my drum at him, but observed no result.

After changing drums I saw a party of about 70 enemy troops by the side of the Poelacappelle- Westroosbeke Road at 10.40 am. I dived on them & fired a drum at 500ft to 50 ft, & they scattered. I zoomed up & changed my drum & fired another 50 rounds from the same range at them, as they had gathered together again. They scattered. I was then attacked by an Albatross Scout, & after I had fired one round at him my gun jammed. So I returned.

I saw an E.A. two –seater crashed by 2/Lt. De Fontenay just East of St. Julien at 10.30 am”.

On the next day

From R.F.C Crash Report. On 21st September 1917 John Machaffie left his aerodrome at 12.45pm in a Type 27 Nieuport Scout No B6765 on another patrol with at least one other Nieuport of 29 Squadron flown by Lieutenant Dudley McKergow. The next record of the pair was that both planes were located crashed at around 2.15pm at Sheet 28 1 7 A central, after a mid air collision. Both men were killed. The planes were completely destroyed indicating impacted at high altitude. No record of fire.

There is also further information written by his Commanding Officer who wrote to John’s father: -

“ He was shot through the head in an air fight & killed instantaneously. He had done most gallant work whilst with this Squadron, & was one of the post popular members. Please accept the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers & myself in your great loss. I went to his funeral yesterday, and he was buried in the English Cemetery at Ypres, by the side of another officer of his Squadron.”

His brother Ralph also wrote home: -

“ Whilst returning with his Squadron from the day’s stunt a Gotha appeared. John & another officer turned and attacked it. A baby Nieuport Machine is a single seater & armed with one gun. A Gotha has a crew of three & three guns mounted on swivels. The fight therefore was hopelessly one sided. John was a Scout Pilot flying a baby Nieuport & fighting almost daily for six weeks. He was shot through the head by the Gotha gunner.”

McKergow Robert Dudley Wilson, 2nd Lieutenant, 5th Dragoon Guards attached to Royal Flying Corps (R.F.C.)

Dudley was the son of Lieutenant Colonel R. W. McKergow, OBE, M.F.H. and Mrs. J. E. McKergow, of Twineham Grange, Twineham, Sussex. He was killed in action 21st September 1917. Age 19. )

The following report appeared in ‘The Mid-Sussex Times’ October 2nd, 1917:-

LIEUTENANT D. W. McKERGOW KILLED. - Much sympathy will be extended to Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. McKergow, (Queen's Own) Royal West Surrey Regt, and Mrs. McKergow, of Twineham Grange, in the bereavement they have been called on to suffer by the death, in action on September 21st, of their elder son, Lieutenant Dudley Wilson McKergow of the Dragoon Guards (attached Royal Flying Corps). Born February 13th, 1898 and educated at Rottingdean School and Uppingham, deceased entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in May, 1915, and was gazetted to the Dragoon Guards on October 2Oth, 1915. He joined the R.F.C. as an observer on September 13th, 1916, and served four months on the Continent, returning to England to obtain his Pilot's certificate. He went back to France on August 11th last and his death occurred whilst he was flying his Commanding Officer writes " Your son was on of the most popular members of this squadron, and had done very gallant work during the short time he was with us."

The following is taken from the book 'Astride Two Centuries' The life of Bob McKergow' by Peter McKergow pub. 1999

(Letter home from Dudley dated September 18th, 1917.)

Many thanks for your letter dated 14th. I am still in the land of the living as you see.

We had a terrific scrap yesterday. Four of us against 8 Huns, and Chapman shot one down out of control. We fought for about ten minutes, then several of us put ourselves out of control and got away with the assistance of clouds. One persistent Hun followed me down the clouds and got on my tail firing from about 50 yards, but I managed to shake him off by diving into another lot of clouds and steering by compass. I had four holes in my top plane but was not shot about any more than that, which goes to prove that these particular Huns were rotten shots, as we were fighting to great disadvantage from start to finish........ There is no more news at present so I will say goodbye. Love to all.

With much love from, Dudley

This was Dudley's last letter for on September 25th, the Bolney Post & Telegraph Office received a telegram from the War Office, which was immediately taken to Twineham Grange by a boy on a bicycle. It read:

Deeply regret to inform you Lt R.W.D McKergow 5 Dragoon Guard attached R.F.C 29 Squadron was killed in action September twenty first. The Army Council expresses their sympathy.

Secretary, War Office

Dudley's CO wrote to his father the day after he had been killed, telling him the circumstances.

“29 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, BEF., FRANCE.

Dear Col. McKergow

It is with deepest regret that I have to write and tell you that your son was killed yesterday. He was engaged in a fight in which one of our machines was shot down and fell on to your son's machine. I saw the doctor who was on the spot and he told me that he was killed instantaneously.

I went to his funeral yesterday and he was buried by the side of the other officer in the English Military Cemetery at Ypres. The map reference of which is 1; 40,000 sheet 2817B2.2.

Your son was one of the most popular members of this Squadron and had done very gallant work during the short time he was with us. Please accept the deepest sympathy from the whole Squadron in your great loss.

Yours sincerely, Charles M A Chapman, Major.”

We will never know the full details of these two pilots deaths or the exact details of why these two planes collided but in recording this here will bring their memory to a wider group

details also taken from articles on the internet facts from nation archives & items I own

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I've got a studio portrait of McKergow, but my scanner's on the fritz, and I'm unable to post it.

Chris

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THE PARISH CHURCH OF ST. PETER Twineham

This is a small 16th century structure consisting of a chancel with modern north organ-chamber, nave, south porch, and west tower, with a shingled oak spire. The walls are of brick, one of the earliest brick built churches in Sussex. Inside of Church In the north wall of the nave are two stained glass windows situated side by side, the inscription across both windows reads: "In loving memory of Lt. Robert Dudley Wilson McKergow 5th Dragoon Guards attached RFC born 13 Feb 1898 Killed in action as a pilot 21 Sept 1917 laid to rest in the Military Cemetery Ypres. "Greater love have no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friends"

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  • 3 months later...

I am researching both these men and this has given me lot to go on, I much appreciate all who have contributed to such an interesting topic.

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