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Guest Ian Bowbrick

You favourite Fighter Pilot............

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

I have always regarded James McCudden as under rated by many authors (perhaps because he was a ranker!), anyhow who is everyone's favourite WW1 fighter pilot and why?

(Please note I have not said Ace)

Ian

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CROONAERT

Raoul Lufberry, mainly because I think his insignia is fantastic. Also Charles Nungesser for the same reason and the fact that I think he showed total dedication to his proffession alongside living a "filmstar" lifestyle (when he was on leave!).Having to be carried to his plane because of injuries shows this dedication. He just loved flying! He even died attempting to fly across the Atlantic (which , judging by modern evidence, he might actually have succeeded in).

Dave.

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Paul Reed

I have always admired Major Len Tilney MC of 40 Sq RFC, who was killed in March 1918. He took Mick Mannock under his wing when he was an inexperienced pilot, and obviously realised his potential. He also developed a method of downing German observation balloons in 1917. He comes from the same village as my wife, and there is a beautiful memorial to him in the church. We have often visited his grave at Cabaret Rouge, and was pleased one year to see that a member of the Tilney family had been over. There is quite a good description of him and photo in the book by "McScotch".

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Guest Ian Bowbrick
Raoul Lufberry, mainly because I think his insignia is fantastic. Also Charles Nungesser for the same reason and the fact that I think he showed total dedication to his proffession alongside living a "filmstar" lifestyle (when he was on leave!).Having to be carried to his plane because of injuries shows this dedication. He just loved flying! He even died attempting to fly across the Atlantic (which , judging by modern evidence, he might actually have succeeded in).

Dave.

Dave - That attempt was just before Lindburgh in 1929. I seem to remember that some wreckage was found/spotted in Canada high on mountain some time ago, but nothing else.

Ian

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Terry

For his all round career, not just shooting down enemy aircraft, the Canadian ace William Barker ranks high on my list. He earned his first MC as an observer and his second flying RE8's, before even becoming a fighter pilot. A VC, two DSO's, three MC's, a Croix de Guerre, and an Italian Silver Medal for Valour. The latter was for a behind-the-lines mission involving landing a spy. All this plus fifty victories!

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Will O'Brien

I've always thought Lothar Von Richthofen to have been a great fighter pilot. Considering the amount of time he spent in the air he had a better kill ratio than his famous brother. Scored an amazing 24 victories in the space of 6 weeks & shot down Albert Ball. His only draw back of course was he seemed a bit prone to crashing & getting wounded. Its quite possible that if he had started his fighter pilot career earlier (only became a pilot in March 1917) & had spent less time in hospital (most of the summer of 1917, most of the spring of 1918 & he didn't fly again in combat after August 1918 when he was wounded for the 3rd time) he could have scored many more kills than the 40 he was credited with.

Will

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CROONAERT
Dave - That attempt was just before Lindburgh in 1929. I seem to remember that some wreckage was found/spotted in Canada high on mountain some time ago, but nothing else.

Ian

May 1927 to be precise. His plane was last seen on the 8th May. I'd heard that some wreckage of the correct era had been discovered in swamp land somewhere (the exact location escapes me) near the east coast of the USA. This was last year. Certain French organisations claimed this as being Nungesser's plane, but whether they're following it up, I don't know.

Dave.

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

Dave,

He was flying with some guy called Cawley (sp) - what do you know about him?

Ian

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Guest Olivier G

Hi everybody,

Charles Nungesser flew with French navigator Fran├žois Coli (Marseille 1881- North Atlantic 1927). They both disappeared on their plane named Oiseau Blanc (white bird) on May 9th 1927.

Best regards,

Olivier

post-25-1067185117.jpg

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Guest Olivier G

And here's L'Oiseau Blanc, getting out of his Levasseur hangar in Le Bourget.

Best regards,

Olivier

post-25-1067186019.jpg

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Guest Olivier G

Oups ! he's not getting out but IN !!!

Sorry :-)

Olivier

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MikeW

The Canadian, Raymond Collishaw, an ace with the Royal Naval Air Service, who served with distinction right through to WW2.

He was aggressive, skillfull, lucky, not afraid to take unpopular decisions, but above all else he had style. To put it into modern idiom, "he talked the talk and walked the walk"!

If he'd flown for the RFC he would almost certainly have ended the war with a VC.

Mike

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Jonathan Saunders

McCudden - he came a long way from a humble background, had an excellent fighting record to rival all his peers and was a local lad to boot.

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cameldriver

There are a number, but Werner Voss has to be high on the list. The description of his final fight with 56 Squadron is very impressive--and these are his enemies paying homage.

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Andrew Smith

I have always had a soft spot for Frank Alberry, having lost his leg in an action that won him a DCM, he petitioned Buckingham Palace and was allowed to commence pilot training where he ended the war with 7 victories.

In the next war "Jerry" Pentland and the one armed Alan Binnie dropping grenades on Japanese troops from a Dragon Rapide always took my fancy. Binnie lost his arm when shot down by Lothar von Richthofen during the Great War.

Andrew

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Thomas

McCudden not only because of how many planes he destroyed but because he was an inspiration to his men and an exellent leader.

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Guest Breguet

Having just finished writing his biography I have to say Major Roderic Stanley Dallas DSO, DSC* CdeG MID. This little known hero of mine made 50 victories (according to my reasearch from Official service records, logbook, combat reports, squadron record books etc). He replaced Major Tilney (who I notice was mentioned earlier) and was very fondly remembered by all who knew him. The American and French Aero Clubs struck special medals during the War which were only awarded to a select few and he got one from each of them. He was shot down helping out a friend in an unwinable predicament. He was 26 when he died.

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Ste

James Bigglesworth, RFC. :)

Seriously, this gallant creation of a real RFC pilot (Capt W.E. Johns) inspired my interest in all things military as a child. Loved by friends, feared by foes and respected by all. Still patrolling the skies, no doubt!

Ste

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Guest Woodylepic

Hi im searching some Blue Print from the Levasseur PL8 "L'oiseauc Blanc"

i have find only 1 side of the plane.

pl8n.gif

somebody have or know a website where i can get the top and front view ???

here some cool data i have found on the net. that very interesting !

http://www.herodote.net/histoire05090.htm

http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Unfinishedflight.html

http://www.numa.net/history/project_15.htm

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Charles Fair

Pour moi - Guynemer

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duckman
Having just finished writing his biography I have to say Major Roderic Stanley Dallas DSO, DSC* CdeG MID. This little known hero of mine made 50 victories (according to my reasearch from Official service records, logbook, combat reports, squadron record books etc).

My own preference is for Phil Fullard. I admire anyone who could survive and conquer (40 victories) primarily on pilot skill. He was, by his own admission, an indifferent shot (unlike Bishop, Barker, von Richthofen, Fonck etc) so I have something in common with him ! !

cheers

Duckman.

PS: Hi Breguet, been intrigued by your work on Stan Dallas since I first read about it on the Aerodrome forum. When does the book come out? Publishing details? Anything? I for one will be in the queue to buy it.

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