Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

1st Canadian Machine Gun Company


Tony Lund

Recommended Posts

I wonder if anyone can add anything to this:

At Holmfirth Police Court on Tuesday 8th October 1917, Arthur Rollinson (737185), was charged with being absent from the 1st Canadian Machine Gun Company, he entered a plea of guilty.

Constable Rose testified that the prisoner was at home (that is at Holmfirth) because of a family bereavement, and that he had been taken ill, and the doctor had then sent him to the hospital. In answer to the charge the prisoner said that he could not break away from his wife and family, he said his wife was not a strong woman and she had a large family on her hands.

Constable Rose added that Mrs. Rollinson was the eldest of nine children and her father had died leaving her with all the children to look after. The court then ordered Arthur Rollinson to be handed over to a military escort.

That is all the newspaper gives me.

As near as I can tell from his attestation paper he was born in Yorkshire, presumably Holmfirth, and he lived at Elmora? And he enlisted at Calgary on 27th July 1916. I assume that he was single became he gave his next of kin as his mother, also living at Elmora? He was a farmer born on 28th June 1892.

Anything else must be a guess, he obviously came to England with the Canadian army and probably was given leave, probably taken at Holmfirth, probably met or more likely re-met and married his wife then or on the next leave. Returned to Holmfirth either because of the death of one of his family or hers, probably her father. Did not return on the appointed date, so his superiors telephoned or telegraphed Holmfirth police and they passed it on to Constable Rose, who incidently had one son dead, one on the Western Front, and one a POW in Germany.

Maybe someone else knows something more.

Tony.

Arthur Rollinson.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't add any more Tony but you'd be able to get his service papers from the National Archives in Canada. They would give you more information of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest julian putkowski

Tony,

I have a fairly substantial collection of data about CEF and other soldiers who deserted during the First World War and would very much like to assist you with further details about this case but because the offence of Desertion rendered those found guilty liable to the Death Penalty, and the List Owner has banned references to anything associated with executions, I am unable to provide you with the data you seek.

Fraternally,

Julian Putkowski

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Paul, your best bet is going to be his records from the Canadian National Archives (link).

He doesn't show up in the 1911 census, but it is not completely translated yet (link)

marc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, I will come back to this when I have finished spending a fortune on newspaper copies, war diaries and books. Hopefully around Christmas.

Thanks again.

Tony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Tony,

I had a look at the War Diary entries of the 1st Canadian Machine Gun Company June to December 1917. There is no mention of a Court-Martial for Arthur Rollinson at all. There are mentions of the arrest of a Pte. (for hitting the Military Police) and the sentencing of a Lieut. (drunkenness) by the Court, so my tentative conclusion is that Rollinson was lucky and went free. No hard facts to prove this though, it is of course possible that serious cases were not mentioned. One would have to go through the lot to verify this.

War Diaries 1st Canadian Machine Gun Company free of charge. Fast download program LAC Extract ditto. :)

Cheers,

Michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, I put his name into the Canadian Court Martial search and nothing came up.

Constable Rose seems to have been standing up for him in court and he was a long serving and respected police officer. I would guess that the doctor who sent him to the hospital in Holmfirth probably held a temporary military rank, I have not seen the doctor’s name but they do seem to be rotating the remaining doctors between home and the Western Front during the last part of the war, so a doctor on his home turn would presumably still be an officer. And Arthur Rollinson was almost certainly on compassionate leave in the first place.

Thanks for the link I will take a look at that diary.

Tony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...