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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Aiming guns at sea


IanA

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I am tickled pink that my query has resurfaced. I don't understand a word. I now see why gunnery officers need to be able to count without using their fingers.

Ian

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I am tickled pink that my query has resurfaced. I don't understand a word. I now see why gunnery officers need to be able to count without using their fingers.

If you don't understand a word, I have failed in my aim -- a fire control issue there.

Feel free to direct any queries to me in any language you see fit, and I will not think you dim. Just help me understand what you feel you know is true and that will help me shape my answers.

tone (emailable via that name @dreadnoughtproject.org)

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Can I suggest reading Forester's book "The Ship". I deals with WW2, but has marvellous description of the fire control system (and many other aspects of a warship's life).

On skipping cannonballs, yes it was a known technique. It gave a longer range, but, of course, only worked in a calm.

Lastly, of course the weather has a big effect on things. In very bad weather even nuclear missiles can't be launched due to wave size (and other things I can't go into).

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If you don't understand a word, I have failed in my aim -- a fire control issue there.

I was being flippant (moi?) but, as you say, 'Oh the intricacies'. It appears that a good naval gunner required not just a command of three dimensional geometry and intimate knowledge of his weapon and instruments, but also a flair or 'knack' and, maybe, a bit of luck too.

Amazing plans!

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On skipping cannonballs, yes it was a known technique. It gave a longer range, but, of course, only worked in a calm.

It may have worked when the enemy was 800 yards away and your projectile was a sphere. With a pointed round at 20,000 yards, I'd say you'd better just concentrate on getting it on target, and save any skimming tricks for when you can do that every time... :D

Having said that, of course, Barnes Wallis' bouncing bomb was originally visualised for use against German battleships holed up in fjords.

Regards,

MikB

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