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Jackie

German East Africa

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Jackie

I am trying to find my Grandfather, Bruce Quinn, who served in German East Africa in WW1.

Due to his father dying and his mother remarrying, he could be enlisted under either of 2 surnames, and could have used his first name or middle name. I've checked the medal rolls twice for anything remotely connected but can't get any info that way.

I can't find any information at all about which regiments served in German East Africa. I know he was taught by the army to drive a lorry, and believe he served in the transport division, and was in hospital in Dublin at the end of the war, suffering from malaria. Apart from that, I have no other info.

Can anyone advise me how I would go about finding out ANYTHING that would help me? German East Africa seems to be the forgotten part of the war, and I just don't know where to try next.

Hopefully someone will be able to help me!

Thanks

Jackie

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MartinWills

The principal units serving in East Africa were Kings African Rifles; 2nd Loyal North Lancs and 25th Royal Fusiliers plus various African and Indian units. A lorry driver, however, would more likely have been with a "support" unit.

Possible candidates might be 570th MT (Motor Transport) coy. ASC (Army Service Corps). one of the field ambulances or the East Africa Mechanical Transport Corps.

I am trying sdesperately to recall titles of any of the few volumes on the campaign but all that spring to mind are Frances Brett Youg - Marching on Tanga and the official history

Lt. Col. Charles Hordern

Official History of the Great War

Military Operation

East Africa

Volume 1

Aug 1914 - Sept 1916

Published in 1941 by the HMSO it was reprinted by the Imperial War Museum/Battery Press but is not currently available. You should be able to consult a copy at the British Library or IWM (the latter by appointment) or borrow a copy through an inter library loan. It does contain a bibliography.

Volume 2 was never published.

Hope this is helpful.

Martin

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Guest Pete Wood

You might also look for this book

EAST AFRICA BY MOTOR LORRY by WW Campbell; Recollections of an ex-Motor Transport Driver. London: John Murray, 1928.

I seem to remember it was nearly all Model T Ford 1 ton lorries. The book was full of the hardships of that campaign. Lots of pics, too, but poor quality!!

I once owned a copy, but loaned it out......

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Sue Light

Jackie

For general reading about the war in Africa, try:

'Battle for the Bundu - The First World War in East Africa'

Charles Miller

'The Great War in Africa'

Byron Farwell

And fictional, and a bit lightweight, but it has its good points is:

'An Ice-Cream War'

William Boyd

Regards - Sue

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Neil Burns

Battery Press

Hi Jackie,

If you click on the above link the Battery Press is still advertising Volume I of the East African Official History.

Good luck,

Neil

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gem22

Jackie

You might like to try www.addall.com and check the used book section. copies are available from about £25 to £240. Personally I'd go for the less expensive ones but then I am a bit of a cheapskate.

Garth

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paul guthrie

The first volume of Hugh Strachan's lenghty WW1 history has an enormous amount on the war in Africa. There are copies available cheap now.

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CROONAERT

Jackie.

If ,by chance, you find he was in the 2/Loyals, give me a shout. I've got quite a bit of info on them in east Africa.

Dave.

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Graham-McAdam
The first volume of Hugh Strachan's lenghty WW1 history has an enormous amount on the war in Africa.

....as does the TV series of Strachan's history, recently shown here - lots of fascinating stories about East and west Africa (now Namibia). Interesting because so unfamiliar (well, to me anyway). Catch it when it reaches Kentucky, Paul.

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Jackie

Many, many thanks to everybody who has given me lots of information on this topic. I've got lots to start with now - I know I won't find him overnight, but at least I think I'm on the right track.

If anybody does have any more specific info about specific units/regiments etc, I'd still be very grateful to hear.

All the best

Jackie :rolleyes:

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weightmanrm

Jackie,

For general interest on German East Africa- but unlikely to help you with tracking your grandfather directly - the best/quickest summary of the 25th Royal Fusiliers activities are via the following web site:

http://www.frontiersmenhistorian.info/

This has some useful books to follow up.

The main problem you will have is that the troops doing the fighting were marching over long distances with native porters and very short rations. The transports probably rarely kept up with them, so there will be few cross references.

The fact that your grandfather succumbed to malaria is also typical, and often soldiers were reported to suffer more from the climate and disease than from fighting.

Yours...... Richard

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Guest MaryF

To Jackie,

Naval and Military Press offer:

The East African Force 1915-1919

ISBN 0898391741 £25

http://www.naval-military-press.com

To anyone who may be able to help please!

My Grandfather George Franklin (Pte.S.4 145453) Army Service Corps

was in East AFrica until he was invalided out in May 1917 with Malaria.

He apparently looked after horses, but that is all I know.

Does anyone know what parts of the ASC were involved there then?

Also, can anyone tell me what the "S.4" means in his service number?

I plan a trip to the PRO in July in hope of finding more info.

Many thanks

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Tim Birch

The following ASC Companies served in East Africa up to 1918:-

570 from 17 Sept 1915 (Brigade supply column MT) absorbed into 648 MT Co 21 June 1917 PRO WO 95 5377

599 From 320 Oct 1915 Advanced MT Depot PRO WO 95 5378

618 from Jan 1916 18 Motor Ambulance Convoy PRO WO 5 5371

622 absorbed into 648 MT Co June 1917 Naval Kite Baloon Section MT PRO N/K

632 ditto Ammunition column MT PRO N/K

633 ditto Ammunition column MT PRO N/K

634 ditto Divisional Ammunition Column MT PRO N/K

635 13 Jan 1916 Brigade Supply Column MT PRO WO 95 5377/8

699 17 April 1916 29 Motor Ambulance Column PRO WO 95 5371

816 absorbed into 648 MT Co July 1918 Supply Column MT (long distance moves)

817 ditto ditto ditto PRO N/K

Tim

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Guest MaryF

Thank you, Tim for a prompt response. Very useful information.

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matteyre

My grandfather Harry Eyre served with 570 MT Company ASC, there are some pictures on my profile... He too suffered with malaria, and was in the hospital in Kilwa several times, and also went back to South Africa to recover at one point. He was commissioned and ran the ASC stores depot attached to the RNAS at Kilwa, hope you've had some luck with your search

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matteyre

will check my grandfathers sketches to see if there is a Quinn mentioned

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Archer

622 MT COMPANY ASC

This is no doubt the wrong place to post this, but ...

I am researching the career of a gentleman commissioned as a Second Lieutenant into the Army Service Corps with effect from 13 December 1915 (his civilian experience was described as "Motor Engineer, & passed through Machine & fitting shops"). He was posted on strength, A.S.C. Depot, Grove Park, and then to No. 622 MT Company "for East Africa".

622 M.T. Coy. Naval Kite Balloon Section [sic] embarked on 7 February 1916.

My chap was posted on a date unknown (possibly in June 1917) to M.T. Mobile Workshops, and invalided to South Africa in July 1917.

Nothing on 622 MT Company in the National Archives. Would love to know more about it.

William

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bushfighter

William

Please send the chap's name.

The Kite Balloon Section was not a success on land because it used too many resources in its operations, and the logistic side (chaps carrying stuff on their heads and backs) could not cope with its demands.

But Kite Balloon observation was a success when used on a RN ship.

Regards Harry

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Archer

Thomas Lawton Goodman

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jayelbee

I am trying to find out information about Pte Leifur Eric Solvason, Regimental Number M2/153415. I have a photo of him that seems to show Canadian Army Service Corps cap and collar badges. However, his name does not come up on a search of the CEF roll. He enlisted in December 1915. According to the British Archives, he served in East Africe with the ASC. He was invalided sick back to Canada in 1917, suffering from Black Water Fever. Any information about him, or possible unit service would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Jim

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bclausen
I am trying to find out information about Pte Leifur Eric Solvason, Regimental Number M2/153415. I have a photo of him that seems to show Canadian Army Service Corps cap and collar badges. However, his name does not come up on a search of the CEF roll. He enlisted in December 1915. According to the British Archives, he served in East Africe with the ASC. He was invalided sick back to Canada in 1917, suffering from Black Water Fever. Any information about him, or possible unit service would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Jim

According to his Medal Index Card for his SWB-bagde, he enlisted 24/12-1915 and was discharged 18/8-1918. He is entitled to SWB-badge, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

There is a set of Pension records available on Ancestry.

Here is some info from those records:

He lived at 659 Wellington Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

His next of kin was his mother, Pauline Solvason, living at the above address. It also states that he was in Canada from 24/12-1915 to 4/2-1916, home from 5/2-1916 to 8/3-1916, in East Africa with 648 Coy from 9/3-1916 to 2/9-1917 and went home 3/9-1917 (He suffred badly from Malaria, and was hospitalized several times.)

He deserted from 6/3-1918 to 12/8-18.

Hope this helps a bit.

Bjoern

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jayelbee

Wow, that's fantastic. Thanks very much for your research. As someone who is new to finding my way around British records, is this available on-line; and where?

Thanks, Jim

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bclausen
Wow, that's fantastic. Thanks very much for your research. As someone who is new to finding my way around British records, is this available on-line; and where?

Thanks, Jim

Jim,

The Pension records are available here: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

I'm not sure... But I think it's possible to sign up for a 14 days free trial period.

Just type in Liefur Solvason, and you will get three hits. His Pension records, Medal Index Card and SWB-card.

Best regards,

Bjoern

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