Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Unit Histories


gem22

Recommended Posts

Stephen Barker

I'd be gratfeul if you could tell me what the 1st Norfolk's were doing on May 9th 1917. Many thanks

Stephen Barker

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
I'd be gratfeul if you could tell me what the 1st Norfolk's were doing on May 9th 1917. Many thanks

Stephen Barker

Stephen

At 2a.m the battalion attacked Fresnoy. "As the infantry advanced the waves were broken up by intense machine gun fire, and eventually, though small bodies penetrated into the woods around Fresnoy, it was found impossible to retake the village and the battalion fell back to Farbus Wood beyond Arleux, where only 36 men and 5 Lewis guns remained.

Garth

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Garth,

What can you tell me about the 2nd Bn, Suffolk Regiment on 30/8/18, the day when Pte Stanley H. Townsend was killed in action?

cheers

Phil

Phil

The battalion was involved in an attack on the villages of Ecoust St Main and Neuville. " It appears that the village of Ecoust was taken easily, but that the battalion, unable to maintain itself in its advanced position, was compelled to fall back on the line of the Ecoust trench."

Garth

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've got these if anyone needs anything looked up.

Garth

Garth, hello,

Could you find out anything more regarding 13266 Private William Edward Ludkin, 1st. Norfolk Regiment, joined 6th Sept 1914 and killed in action 4th July 1916, possibly Guillemont, buried Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery, Arras. Anything else however small would be appreciated, and were the 1st. Norfolks at Guillemont?

Thanks,

Regards,

Rob.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob

First off your man was killed on 4 June 1916 not 4 July. The history does not give much detail as to the whereabouts of the battalion but they were somewhere on the Bailleul - Arras road.

At 9.17pm after 3 hours of bombardment the enemy exploded three large mines of which two were on the Norfolk front. The explosion was immediately followed by an enemy attack. The enemy failed to reach the Norfolk lines but in the course of the action the Norfolks lost 21 men killed, 25 wounded and 19 missing. The battalion was relieved the same night and retired to billets in Agnes-lez-Duisans.

Hope that helps

Garth

Link to post
Share on other sites

Garth,

In case the first "thank you" did not work, thanks for your time and trouble, the information is very much appreciated.

Best regards,

Rob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Gareth

Have you any information on the 2nd Btn Suffolk Rgt. I have today discovered my grandads cousin was kia 20/7/16 serving with them. Any information around this date would be gratefully received.

Regards Doug.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

I realise this thread has been going for quite sometime now, so my fingers are crossed for a reply..

I have recently discovered that my great uncle was killed in action 9th april 1917 at the ages of 21 whilst serving in the second battalion Suffolk Regiment. his name was Sidney James Adams and his regimental number was 40746. He is buried in Tilloy-les-Mofflaaines cemetary.

Could you give me any information on the actions of the 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment for this time as would love to find out what he was involved in at the time of his death..

Thanks very much in advance just incase you get this

Paul.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug,

As Gareth seems to have been AWOL for a couple of months, this is from the History of the Suffolk Regiment 1914-1927 by Lieut.- Col. C.C.R. Murphy.

On the afternoon of the 18th the Germans counter-attacked, forcing their way with fine courage but at great cost into Delville Wood and the northern end of Longueval, which troops of the 3rd Division had just cleared. In consequence, two companies were sent up to Longueval Ridge to support the attack of the 1st Gordon Highlanders on Longueval, the remainder of the battalion moving from the wood into Caterpillar valley itself, where they were persistently shelled.

Early on the 19th Captain and Adjutant Trollope and Lieut. T.D. Pickard-Cambridge were wounded, 2nd Lieut. V.C. Russell taking over the duties of adjutant. Throughout this time of stress Captain J.D. Marshall, R.A.M.C., medical officer to the battalion, always proved himself equal to the occasion, being subsequently awarded the D.S.O. in recognition of his splendid services.

On July 20 the battalion, having assembled and deployed in Pont Street, took part in the renwed attacks on Longueval and Delville Wood. It was still dark when the artillery bombardment lifted and the advance began. The tow Suffolk companies in the forward line moved in double lines of platoons with a front of about 140 yards each.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Much bitter fighting followed, which, though indecisive locally, enabled a footing to be gained in High Wood by a Division (33rd) containing another Suffolk battalion - the 4th, and the British line to be linked up thence with Longueval. The casualties in the 2nd Battalion were heavy, and included the following officers- Killed: Captain A.L. Platts; Lieut. H.N. Kemble; 2nd Lieuts. S. Johnson and S.G. Bennett. Wounded: 2nd Lieuts. G.F. Igglesden and W.H. Hamblyn. Missing : Lieut. C.B. Bevan; 2nd Lieuts. A.L. Evans, H.P. Allanson, A.G.B. Patten, A.C. Taylor, and J.C. Bradley, M.C. With the exception of 2nd Lieut. Patten, who was wounded and taken prisoner, all these missing officers were subsequently reported killed. During this attack Brevet-Major W. La Touche Congreve, D.S.O., M.C., brigade-major to the 76th Brigade, was killed by a sniper while reconnoitring.

On July 21 the battalion returned to Breslau trench, and a few days later moved out of the battle zone to Bois des Tailles.

Andy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

From the same source,

On Easter Sunday - the day before the Battle of Arras - The Rev. G.C. Danvers, chaplain to the 2nd Battalion, and himself a Suffolk man, who had done so much good work in the Serre sector on the Somme in 1916, held a Communion service in the chalk Caves at Arras. A sketch of this solemn and impressive scene, made on the spot at the time by Lieut. W.J. Allum, appeared in the Illustrated London News.

The 2nd Battalion emeged from the caves on April 9, and moved into its assembly trenches. The preliminary bombardment, which had been going on for several days, was then nearing its height. To men who had been so long underground, the noise sounded like that of "cannons overcharged with double cracks," and after the silence of the caves was almost deafening. Attached to the 9th Brigade for these operations, the battalion was ordered to support the 4th Royal Fusiliers, the objective being a strong position known as the Harp. When the Fusiliers reached a certain point the battalion was to pass through them and carry on to the north and east sides of the redoubt.

Link to post
Share on other sites

At zero the Fusiliers advanced. On the way to the Harp a valley had to be crossed along which the enemy put down a 5.9 barrage, but the 2nd Battalion, moving in artillery formation, managed to get through almost untouched.

From our original line the ground for some distance in front was clearly visible, and it was obvious from the steady forward movement of our men that the attack was going well. Prisoners began to trickle in, and soon the whole objective was in our hands. About noon the battalion headquarters moved up into the Harp. No counter-attacks came, and in the early afternoon the 8th Brigade passed through and continued the advance. In the evening the battalion returned to the old Hindenburg line, where they were replaced under the orders of their own brigade.

Andy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Stiletto..

Thanks so much for your speedy reply! its so facinating to read exatcly what my great uncle would have been a part of on the day he died.. i shall now try and find some more doccuments detailing this day (if there are any) and continue on my journey into his last days.

Thanks again

Paul.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pau,

Here is the sketch of the Rev. G.C. Danvers holding Communion Service in the caves.

Andy

post-1871-1170757998.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy

Thank you very much for the information.

Regards Doug.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug,

No problem, hope it helps you a little.

Andy

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've got these if anyone needs anything looked up.

Garth

Hi Garth

Any chance of a few details in respect of 7/Suffolk on 28th April 1917, please?

Much appreciated.

Ken

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

I'd like to know if anyone has any info on my father's service in the Suffolks, before he joined the MGC and became a tank commander.

2041 Arthur Herbert Blowers 1/4 Suffolk Regt arrived France 9/11/1914.

Thanks.

Roger

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...