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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Roughriders ASC


Guest John Bradshaw
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Guest John Bradshaw

Hi All,

I'm new to this list so I hope I have directed this to the correct section.

I am trying to trace the First World War record of my grandfather James Howard. All we have are a couple of photos of him:

The first shows him with 12 colleagues in ASC(?) uniform with a hand painted notice at the front saying "The Roughriders ASC" -- hence this post.

The second with 3 colleagues in fatigues at the entrance to a stable. So we presume he was with the section of the ASC handling the horses.

Before wading in, does anyone know anything about the "Rough Riders" and could help us perhaps find the official name of his regiment etc before tracing him further.

Thanks in advance

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The City of London Yeomanry are known as the Rough Riders, see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_City_of_L..._(Rough_Riders)

and/or

http://www.regiments.org/regiments/uk/volm.../vcav/LonRR.htm

The ASC is the Army Service Corps.

Oh, and welcome to the forum!

Regards,

Neil.

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Hi John - welcome to the Forum

not heard of them but I will check the Corps history tomorrow and see it they are mentioned

Stephen

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Apart from being the name of one of the London Yeomanry units, a Roughrider was a riding instructor and part of his job was to "break" or train horses for riding and other duties.

The ASC would have had their own Roughriders.

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Have checked the "shorter"Corps history and there is no mention of the Roughriders; there are also 20+ "James Howards" listed in the medial index cards. Do you know whether he had a middle name?

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Guest John Bradshaw

No he had no middle name. I had picked up the London Yeomanry connection from Google but had discounted it as he was from Lancashire and was a cotton worker in Nelson before the outbreak of the war.

I had assumed (perhaps wrongly) he enlisted in a local regiment.

It may be the answer is it was just a generic term picked up by the groups who broke the horses. He had no experience with horses pre-war as far as we know.

This is the more 'regimental' picture we have post-12299-1146561409.jpg

Thanks to all for their speedy and detailed replies. What a great list!!

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Ok - so what have we

I think we have a section of transport drivers ina wooden camp ; I would guess its an end of course photo

But I could be wrong...............

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As far as I can tell, the Army Service Corps was responsble for the provision of nearly all of the horses used by the British Army during World War I. (The chief exceptions seem to have been mounts for cavalry regiments, which were probably trained at cavalry reserve regiments at home, and chargers for officers, which were often privately purchased.) As this number was huge, and included a large number of young, untrained horses from various places around the world, the ASC must have employed quite a large number of "rough riders."

According to Michael Young, the author of an excellent history of the ASC, some of the men employed by the ASC for this task were reservists who had previously served with cavalry regiments. (Prior to the war, cavalry regiments serving at home trained their own mounts, as well as mounts for the overseas regiment they were "linked" to.)

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I've just checked Michael Young's book on the ASC. In an appendix, he provides a list of ASC remount squadrons - units that were responsible for training horses. Each was commanded by a major, consisted of 200 or so men, and trained 500 horses at a time.

Squadron Location

34 BEF

35 Unknown

48 Ormskirk

51 Redhill

52 Market Harborough

53 Leicester

54 Arborfield Cross

55 Newcastle on Tyne

56 York

62 York

63 Swaythling

64 Croft Spa

65 Woolwich

66 Luton

67 BEF

96 BEF

The list suggests that most of the training of horses was done at home. However, as some horses seem to have been shipped directly from their points of origin (e.g. USA, Canada, Argentina) to France, the BEF had a small capability to train horses.

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I agree, the photo has the air of a typical "end of course" photo - looking smart but slightly relaxed and pleased with themselves.

Hoplophile - Can you show some details of the ASC book you refer to. I am looking for a good source on the ASC as i have a growing interest in them. The list of training establishments hints at a great deal of lovely little snippets. Thanks

JW

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  • 9 months later...
Have checked the "shorter"Corps history and there is no mention of the Roughriders; there are also 20+ "James Howards" listed in the medial index cards. Do you know whether he had a middle name?

hi all,

can you help please, Pte 3320 J E Farmer City of london Yeomanry, volunteered 4th aug. 1914. (3 days before his 18th), Later MGC Cavalry 169346. Victory medal, British Medal, Corps of machine gun/102/B7 page 1026. His daughter (my mum!) is 80 this year, l would love to help her know where and what her father did, they share the same birth date. If it helps he had chest problems in later life, l was told he was "gased". I would like to do the research, but dont understand where to start.

thankyou for listening,

Best Wishes, Mike.

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  • 1 year later...

from what i have found the rough riders used to break in new horses my wifes great grandfather was a rough rider with 45th remount regiment, they where in ASC he died in salonika from malaria

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  • 1 year later...

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