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Remembered Today:

Easter rising comemmoration for the 1916 rebellion


museumtom

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Howaya Tom,

Nothing there except ... or perhaps ... was the only thing that happened in Cashel, or should I press a button?

Ken

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Hello Tom,

Great work you have done and always interested in it. Completely ignore my sense of the ridiculous. If I can be of any help to you in the Dublin area, please give me a shout.

Ken

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Is it not sad how the innocents are totally forgotten? I suppose dehumanising with terms such as "civillians" rather than real people such as J.F Foster aged 2 years 10 months or J Gibney aged 5 makes the events of Easter 1916 more pallitable. No memorials for them or the other 230 killed!

Ken

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Hello Ken. As an Jackeen myself Its nice to hear from fellow entheusiasts. There is a fair on in the Teachers Club 36 Mountjoy sq on saturday may 27 at 1 am. Some forum members should be there also.

If you are in the area pop in and ask for me.

Regards.

Tom.

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armourersergeant

Never saw this first time round!

thanks for the pics, Is it Cashel that has a pub called 'Lonergan's' ?

Saw it when I was in Ireland a few years back. As it was my name had to go and have a drink.

hope I am recalling correctly

Arm

Ps nearly called my first Daughter Cashel, but went for Cora instead, thought she would be called 'shell' by everyone!!

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Tom

Many thanks for the interesting links

Dave

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Arm

I dont drink in Cashel so I dont know the pub names. I do know there is a Lonergans pub in Fethard and Clonmel. These two towns are fifteen minutes drive from Cashel.

Dave glad to help.

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I may be stepping into it ... but these are interesting pictures. This actually made NPR a couple of days ago.

The Easter 1916 "Rebellion" was an important milestone in Irish independence ... I think it is fair to say that ... but it is hard for understand how balanced this is as presented by the media. This is NOT a dig ...

It is almost as if all is forgiven between the Republic and the UK ... maybe like the US and the UK ... certainly like the present North South feelings of the "late unpleasentness" ...

Not much of a point here except that it stirrs the thoughts.

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Hi Andy,

Threading into Irish history of this period is like threading into quicksand, or if you like bogwater! You will soon be up to your neck before you know it. Ninety years later and it still appears to be either black or white.

Ken

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By chance, found this last night whilst looking for info on the Inns of Court OTC

Then, Easter 1916, at 2 a.m. came another entrainment order.

Half the battalion didn't believe it: many a one had no razor in his kit when the next chance to shave came. For the trains that we really did entrain into sped off not south-westward for the Plain or France, but away and away up the "North Western," and it wasn't until they disgorged us on Liverpool Docks that rumours could be swopped about "Sinn Fein gentry - broken bottles and shillelaghs."

It was a baptism of fire all right, with flintlocks, shotguns, and elephant rifles, as well as more orthodox weapons. And 100 casualties in two days' street fighting was a horrible loss to one battalion: the more so since my one friend from the ranks, commissioned same day, was shot through the head leading a rush on a fortified comer house; first day on active service, and it was my job to write and tell his mother, who thought him still safe in England.

A hateful task: so was another duty of one misty dawn soon after, when four young officers had to command four firing parties, and four rebel leaders stood in turn blindfold against a wall.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/diaries/varie...ftrenchlife.htm

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Thats the story of Capt Dickson of the Sherwood Foresters. You can read of their fight in the Rising at the following website: http://www.wfrmuseum.org.uk/rhr_Ireland.htm

And a short biography will be published shortly, next week or so, on the Derbyshire lads at war website: http://www.derbyshirelads.uwclub.net/

he had a remarkable war and is the only officer known to have commanded a firing party for the executions of the Irish rebel leaders.

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