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what is this badge?


rony
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Angie

Almost certainly the city coats of arms (Koln is Cologne) and completely un-connected to the pips. They were presumably collected by someone as souvenirs, perhaps during the postwar occupation. Cologne was the centre of the British army of occupation, but Dresden is in Saxony in east Germany.

Ron

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I had a feeling that they didnt have to much meaning to them, I just wish I knew how to get some information on him. I have no name as he changed it & I know he was a prisoner of war' I remember he had 3 fingers cut of his right hand hand & 2 cut of his left & that he was from the Ukraine but other than that I'm clueless.

Thankyou for your imput its nice to know after all these years what the badges are.

Ang

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  • 9 years later...

I sometimes wonder the wisdom of being categorical on these pages but...

 

Here goes nothing!  The star in the original post is of course the Bath Star or "pip" as worn by officers of the British Army.  It is worn by nearly every regiment or Corps.  In the Household division and the HAC, the star of the senior orders of chivalry are worn.  So for the Gren Guards, the Coalies and the WG it is the Garter, the IG wear the Order of the St Patrick and "them as wears buttons in threes" have the Order of the Thistle star.  

 

In in the Light Division, pips were small and black, as were Indian Army Rifle regiments or Gurkha officers'.

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  • 1 year later...

Thought I'd post a couple of photos. This was turned into a bracelet. The back of these were soldered to the chain. Found it in box that was addressed to my Mother sometime before 1945.

I'd appreciate any feedback on it's history.

 

Juncta Medal 2.jpg

Juncta Medal 1.jpg

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good evening,

 

this is one Pips find at Loos en Gohelle - France (Battle of Loos - sept 1915) near chalk pit wood :

 

1361456680_pipesofficier.JPG.2b6b9e635ed3c1d58009d22c53639e51.JPG

 

:poppy:

 

michel

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  • 2 months later...

I have 2 bracelets of a crown with full coverage red velvet (?) behind it, and 2 pips to either side. The crown is the same size as all pips. Was this common practice?

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On 01/11/2007 at 22:45, icey said:

I had a feeling that they didnt have to much meaning to them, I just wish I knew how to get some information on him. I have no name as he changed it & I know he was a prisoner of war' I remember he had 3 fingers cut of his right hand hand & 2 cut of his left & that he was from the Ukraine but other than that I'm clueless.

Thankyou for your imput its nice to know after all these years what the badges are.

Ang

 

My goodness that took me right back.  When I was at school,  (eons ago) I often walked part of the way with an old chap who was on the way to the bookies.  He had exactly the same injury.  I did ask him about it.  He told me that he served with the Tyneside Scottish.  During an attack, a machine gun burst stitched right across his rifle talking off every exposed finger. 

His rifle saved his life.  I often wonder if he was talking about the infamous first day. Shamefully,  If I ever knew his name, I've forgotten it. 

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  • 1 year later...
On 28/03/2006 at 13:12, Bantamenace said:

Motto of the Order of the Bath. A modified Star of the Bath with the motto and three crowns serves as the star ("pip") rank badge in most of the British Army.

Brigade of Guards (i.e. Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Scots Guards). Although the Brigade was augmented in 1900 by the Irish Guards, and in 1915 by the Welsh Guards, the Brigade motto and badge was not modified to Quinque juncta in uno until 1949.

 

It would appear that in February 1960 the CWGC was not aware of the meaning of the motto. See the second entry on the COG-BR that follows. If we combine the information, does this mean that this Officer was a Captain in one of the Guards Regiments that was found at Hangard 62d.U.17.c.5.3? Those coordinates put him in the southeast section of Hangard Wood. With my limited knowledge of the British regiments, I would presume that the time of the event was in either March-April 1918, unless there was a Guards unit with the Canadians August 1918 (not that I know of). They do say "British Officer" but could it be Australian in April 1918 - no idea about their pips.

 

A logical date would be around 23 April 1918.

 

doc2053659.JPG

 

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On 21/04/2020 at 20:12, laughton said:

could it be Australian in April 1918 - no idea about their pips

 

 

Exactly the same as British pips, even today.

 

During war service pips are usually plain blackened bronze, with the gilt and enamel pips (now staybrite) reserved for peace time service.

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33 minutes ago, Chasemuseum said:

...During war service pips are usually plain blackened bronze, with the gilt and enamel pips (now staybrite) reserved for peace time service...

 

This is incorrect for the period, different orders of dress required different sizes/finishes (and even then it is not uncommon to find them used in technically wrong ways, eg enamel type on SD, bronzed on greatcoats, etc). There is a lovely example in the DCLI museum showing this (they have it dated as 1933, but is clearly matches the cuff-rank material examples displayed alongside). Even they seem to have had trouble working out what type should be on a greatcoat...

 

FTF,DCLI, Cornwall 2008 075.jpg

 

Edited by Andrew Upton
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