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Remembered Today:

trench periscopes


uncle bill
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Another recent aquisition. Another meatless month for the nippers.

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another view with a fully extended periscope.

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one is marked Adams, the other Trenchscope.

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Like much war material these were made by various companies to standard patterns. These folding wooden box type periscopes were officially designated the No.9 from 1915. MkI's were made by Adams and R.J. Beck - a name commonly seen on the brass two piece periscope (MK no. escapes me at the moment - got one in storage somewhere!).

They both look like MkII's - 'Trenchscope' had the patent for this originally, it's an improved model with a hidden glass screen as well as a shutter.

Have you got the base spike Bill? - these are usually missing.

Lots more info in Saunders 'Dominating the Enemy' - along with the first book in this series essential reading for any 14-18 militaria enthusiasts.

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one is marked Adams, the other Trenchscope.

It is interesting that some of the manufacturers of Trench Periscopes were companies normally in other lines of business. One, apparently, survives today manufacturing marmalade!

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One, apparently, survives today manufacturing marmalade!

Trenchscope marmalade? That's a new one on me. :)

Rich.

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Gilles, I have one with the spike.

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  • 2 years later...

Hi

I thought i would add to this thread, with this info from one of my signals manuals and a pic of my 1917 Mark 11

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as in Manual

The Periscope is carried in a brown canvas bag provided

with a fastening buckle and web sling for carrying.

There is a pocket inside the case containing two spare

mirrors. The periscope itself is made of light wood and is rectangular

in shape measuring when extended, 2 feet 1 1/2 inches,

and 1 foot 3/4 inch when folded in case. it is

kept in the folded position and a patent catch to hold it

rigid when in the extended position

At the bottom of the instrument is placed a steel bar

fastened by means of a clamping screw, at the other

extremity of which is fastened a steel pin 12 inches long and

1 inch wide, which can be clamped in any desired position

by means of a thumb screw.

Two mirrors are placed in position one at the bottom

facing the observer, and the other at the top facing in the

direction to be observed. These are placed at such an angle

that any object coming within the field of the top mirror

is reflected into the mirror at the bottom.

A piece of thick glass with half an inch of surface exposed

is placed perpendicularly in front of the bottom edge of the

lower mirror. Unless telescope or binoculars are being

used with the periscope' all the observations are made by

looking through the piece of thick clear glass on to the

mirror. The remainder of the aperture is closed by means

of a sliding metal door, which should only be kept open

when observations are being made by other means than

with the naked eye.

Jonathan

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