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chris basey

EDITH CAVELL

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chris basey

From photograhs I have been given it seems that there is a plaque to the memory of Edith Cavell in St Paul's Cathedral in Melbourne and also statue of her in a park in that city.

Could any of our Australian members confirm this and, if so, please tell me what the inscription is on the statue?

I hope to compile a list of the many memorials to her throughout the world that take different forms - mountain, schools, hospitals, etc. Any information greatly appreciated, thank you.

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Peter Beckett

Chris,

unless some other Pal goes sooner, I will be in the city on the 20th Sep and have a look for you.

Peter

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Peter Beckett

Chris,

further to last reply. would you require digital photos?

Peter

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jim_davies

Chris,

There is (or at least when I was last there) a Edith Cavell Hospital at Peterborough, Cambs.

Jim

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Jonathan Saunders

This is more of a contemporary, "living" memorial and may interest you. It is an entry from the School Log for The Council School, Rainham, Kent, and dated 15th May 1919:

"The children were assembled in school yard at 9:15am to pay a silent respect to the remains of Nurse Cavell whose body was taken past the school. The registers were not marked and after a few appropriate words, they (children) were sent home for the morning".

This was repeated on 8th July 1919 when the body of Capt. Fryatt was taken past the school. (Capt Fryatt had been a Merchant Navy skipper executed by the Germans for espionage or something similar I think).

By the words "taken past the school", I should add this was the train carriage that no doubt slowed down near any hamlet or town of any note for the locals to pay their respects. The tracks ran at the end of the school yard.

Earlier this summer I had the good fortune to interview a local man about his knowledge of Rainham and he said about being in the yard when nurse Cavell's body was taken past. I had this extract on me by chance and read it to him, he was amazed, although he could not remember the repeat incident for Capt. Fryatt.

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David_Bluestein

There is a memorial to her which comes in the form of a large dark coloured plaque with figures in relief, at the corner of University Ave. and College St. in Toronto, Ontario Canada.

The next time I am in the city I will try and get over that way for a photo.

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HERITAGE PLUS

David

You may find this site of interest:

http://www.cona-nurse.org/edith_cavell.htm

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Patrick ODwyer

I am sure you know of the one outside the Norwich School? It is a fairly significant structure.

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michaeldr
This was repeated on 8th July 1919 when the body of Capt. Fryatt was taken past the school.  (Capt Fryatt had been a Merchant Navy skipper executed by the Germans for espionage or something similar I think).

"27th July 1916: Captain C. Fryatt of liner 'Brussels' court-marshalled and shot by Germans for alleged attempt to ram German submarine U33."

from the Diary of Events - War Supplement in The Naval Who's Who 1917

Regards

Michael D.R..

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chris basey

Many thanks to everyone who has contributed so far -

Peter: your very kind offer of digital photo much appreciated

Jim: The Peterborough Hospital is a new one to me, it's in the telephone directory s is still there, thanks.

Signals: The school log entry is a wonderful piece of personal history and ties in with the local press reports that the whole of Norfolk stood still that day. I have often wondered if Capt Wyatt transported some of the soldiers on his ferry who had passed through the 'Cavell' escape line.

David: I have a relative in Toronto who wil now get a request for a photo!

Patrick: Yes, I pass it frequently. Several Connaught Rangers passed through the clinique at Brussells. If you don't know of them and would like their names please e-mail me.

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Jim Strawbridge

The statue to her in Trafalgar Square is opposite the National Portrait Gallery. So far as memorials are concerned I have nothing more than has already been posted. But I have a snippet about her return from Belgium. It had been suggested that her remains should be interred in Westminster Abbey but her sisters were of the strong opinion that she should be returned to her beloved Norfolk. Her body at the Tir National was exhumed on the 17th March 1919. A detachment of troops from Cologne was provided by the C-in-C, Cologne at the suggestion of the then Major B.L. Montgomery (Monty). As well as the troops a party of about 30 FANYs commenced the journey through Brussels. At the Gare du Nord (Brussels) a simple service was conducted and the body transported to Ostend. From there the destroyer Rowena , guarded by ratings. made the journey to Dover, arriving at 6pm. From the docks it was taken by carriage by troops under the command of Lt. Michael O'Leary VC, together with a group from the women's services, to Marine Station where the body was guarded overnight by a contingent of Connaught Rangers. The next stage was to transport the body to Westminster Abbey and the train stopped at Folkstone and Ashford so that the local population could pay their respects. The first part of the funeral service was in Westminster Abbey on the 15th May whereafter the cortege transported to Liverpool Street station and entrained to Norwich. A soldier who had been saved by Edith Cavell, appropriately of the Norfolk Regiment (Sgt. Jesse Tunmore), was amongst the last group of pall-bearers who saw the coffin to Norwich Cathedral and the final part of the funeral service. Her body was then laid to rest in Life's Green, outside the south transept.

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HERITAGE PLUS

The Edith Cavell Hospital is approximately two miles west of Peterborough District Hospital and the city centre, just off junction16 on the A47.

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Guest Pete Wood

Cavell Street in East London, near the London Hospital in the East End of the capital, was renamed in her honour (very shortly after her death).

Cavell Street was formerly known as Bedford Street.

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jhill

I suppose this qualifies as a memorial:

Mount Edith Cavell 3363m (11034ft.)

Latitude 52; 40; 00 Longitude 118; 03; 15

Jasper Park

There is also a Mount Fryatt in the area. In fact local pride requires me to claim a second to none collection of similar memorials to Great War persons and battles. It seems we still had quite a bit of unnamed geography in those days.

Of course, one can claim that these were not man made, but an eleven thousand foot pile of rocks is still pretty impressive.

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Myrtle

Chris

I have been researching a Mid Wales sculptor Benjamin Lloyd who was for many years based in Fulham, London (he also lived in Guernsey and Edinburgh for a time). He is listed in the Who's Who of Artists as the sculptor of a monument to Edith Cavell. I have not been able to track down the monument yet but if you come across anything regarding this man please let me know. He usually used a signature with a B struck through with an L. It is possible that he was used as a sculptor to produce only the clothing on the London monument as he was renowned for producing extrememly high quality drapes in stone. Monumental sculpture at that time was quite often produced using more than one sculptor on each piece of work.

Regards

Myrtle

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Greenwoodman

Further to Jil Strawbridge's post, the statue in St Martin's Place is the work of Sir George Frampton RA. (think that's Arts not Artillery!!)

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Charles Fair

When I was at the Great British Beer Festival last month I found a Norfolk brewer, Wolf who have a more liquid memorial to her. Click this: Cavell Ale.

I vaguely remember that it tasted pretty good.

I have no connection with this brewery, other than that I like a decent pint or three of real ale.

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Peter Beckett

Charles,

I have taken the photos for you. I will burn them onto a CD as they are too bulky to email. (they are high resolution jpegs)

Please send me your preferred address off Forum.

There is a bonus as right next to the memorial in St Pauls Cathedral, there is a genuine cemetery cross from an unknown soldier, WW1 vintage. I met the verger whilst there and he has no idea who donated it to the Cathedral.

Peter

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Charles Fair
Charles,

I have taken the photos for you. I will burn them onto a CD as they are too bulky to email. .... Please send me your preferred address off Forum.

Peter - think you must mean Chris, not me!

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Peter Beckett

Charles,

you are absolutely right. Must be early dementia setting in :blink:

Chris,

previous message is for you

Peter ;)

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Peter Beckett

Chris,

CD on its way. No charge, all part of the Pals service.

Peter ;)

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