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Remembered Today:

Definition of a "knut" please


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Gardenerbill

To the south of Manchester can be found the small market town of Knutsford, probabaly Knut's river crossing Knut is still a Norwegian name.

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Steven Broomfield
45 minutes ago, Stoppage Drill said:

Remains in a mortuary chest in Winchester Cathedral.

 

One of our finest Cathedrals. Going off-topic (what? Never!), the 60th Rifles memorial on the Green, adjacent to the West Door is one of my favourites.

45 minutes ago, Stoppage Drill said:

Remains in a mortuary chest in Winchester Cathedral.

 

One of our finest Cathedrals. Going off-topic (what? Never!), the 60th Rifles memorial on the Green, adjacent to the West Door is one of my favourites.

45 minutes ago, Stoppage Drill said:

Remains in a mortuary chest in Winchester Cathedral.

 

One of our finest Cathedrals. Going off-topic (what? Never!), the 60th Rifles memorial on the Green, adjacent to the West Door is one of my favourites.

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A knud or knut is a knot in Luxembourgish. The square known as the knuedler in the city centre takes its name from the monks whoose garden it once was, ?The men with knotted belts'. It is also a form of small doughnut which is cooked as half hitch.

Maybe they were an early form of the Sealed Knot?

 

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Michelle Young
10 hours ago, Stoppage Drill said:

"Where are the lads of the village tonight,

Where are the knuts we knew,

In Piccadilly ? In Leicester Square ? No, not there.

No, not there. They're taking a trip on the Continong,

With their rifles and bayonets bright.

Facing danger gladly, where they're needed badly.

That's where they are tonight."

 

Popular song. Words and music by R. P. Weston and Herman Darewski.

 

The song quoted in the OP was associated with a character "Gilbert the Filbert, the knut with a K" created by Basil Hallam Radford, whose stage name was Basil Hallam. An Old Carthusian, he was killed in action on 20 August 1916.

And buried at Couin 

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Knut...I often wondered.  Thank you.  Rob.

Capture.PNG

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  • 4 months later...
Jonathan Vernon

In a letter to his future wife, the then 20 year old Iris Hotblack, in December 1914, Alan 'Balmy' Morton (Rugby educated, his nicknamed given to him by their Sports Master) used the term when describing the place where he was stationed in XX X XX [Redacted] as ‘thick with Generals Smith Dorrien, Sir John French, The Prince of Wales and all the knuts’. I've found the word used to describe some men of the Cardiff Pals who liked to keep up appearances no matter their circumstances (roughing it on straw, days spent doing physical training, drilling and route marches). Reeves photographers active in Lewes in 1914 (and still going strong in 2017) took photographs of recruits billeted on the town. These 'knut' types stand out because of their stiff-white collars and ties. 

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