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Remembered Today:

Aisne- Chemin des Dames Battle May- June 1918


David_Blanchard
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On 29/11/2020 at 20:59, David_Blanchard said:

This is a trench map included in the 150th Brigade War Diary. It is worth downloading the diary from the National Archives.

BCCB9D3A-49DB-42B2-AF92-0E76FDF96A69.png

That map is great! Ive now found out exactly where the various companies were. I'm intrigued by that front line trench though - it looks to be incomplete with a black line rather than the red trench mapping. Why would that be? Was the front line trench incomplete? From what I understand, the black lines are often designated 'piste' on French maps, which means track, or path. Was some of the front line literally a shallow trackway with no real protection, or is piste another word for a particular type of trench? And where would I find the information about exactly which company he would have been in? 

Thanks

 

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  • 1 year later...

Hi David,

I realise it's over a year since the last post on this thread, but I just wanted to say how interesting and helpful it has been for researching my great-grandfather, Alexander Gerrard, who was a Gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service no. 95324). He enlisted in Aberdeen in November 1915. He was posted missing on the 27th May and it was later confirmed that he was taken as a prisoner of war and held in Trelon. He later died on 17th August that year, but no cause of death was given. From the CWGC, I learned he's buried in Glageon Cemetery - and by sheer luck came across a photo of his gravestone from one of the few photos of the cemetery online. From his service record, he was assigned to the 26th Heavy Battery and I believe that was in the 77th Heavy Artillery Group/Brigade from Dec 17 onwards. I'm not clear, though, which of the four divisions at Chemin des Dame the 77th was part of. Do you have any idea - or am I completely on the wrong track? It would be helpful to aid my understanding of where his battery may have been positioned in the sector.

Also, I've ordered your book and I'm very much looking forward to it. It sounds like an almighty impressive body of research.

Here's the only photo of Alexander we have, which comes from a newspaper clipping in Aberdeen:

Best wishes

Steve

2074176062_AlexanderGerrardServicePortrait.jpg.0357131d83a1357f6d6d61548f599b25.jpg

Edited by Steve Gerrard
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  • 4 months later...

I'm new to this site and searched for Aisne as I recently found that my Great Grand Uncle Sapper Fred Wilshaw died on the first day of this battle and I'm heading out to the Cimetière militaire britannique in Hermonville, just North of Reims in two weeks time to pay my respects (I've already found a photo of his gravestone). I haven't even read this thread yet and look forward to doing so but wondered how easy it is to find out any further info on what may have happened to him or whether that sort of detail is lost.

I have visited the Mulberry harbour before (on a trip to Le Mans) which sparked some interest before I knew of my relatives involvement.

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  • Admin

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Aisne-1918-ePub/p/11432

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aisne-1918-Battleground-Books-WWI-ebook/dp/B0133WGGIG

Welcome to the Forum. @David_Blanchard has published on the Aisne 1918 battles, links to books above. 
You may not be aware but approximately 60% of Great War service records were lost during the Blitz. Any surviving records can be found on pay per view sites such as Ancestry and Find My Past. 
Relevant War diaries can be downloaded for free from the National Archives website after you register. 

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3 hours ago, Michelle Young said:

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Aisne-1918-ePub/p/11432

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aisne-1918-Battleground-Books-WWI-ebook/dp/B0133WGGIG

Welcome to the Forum. @David_Blanchard has published on the Aisne 1918 battles, links to books above. 
You may not be aware but approximately 60% of Great War service records were lost during the Blitz. Any surviving records can be found on pay per view sites such as Ancestry and Find My Past. 
Relevant War diaries can be downloaded for free from the National Archives website after you register. 

Thanks Michelle,

I'm just having a read of

http://www.4thbnnf.com/wordpress/sectors-battles/the-lys/

which is interesting.

I started looking into stuff when I got the deeds to my house and started researching the previous owners so signed up to Ancestry then. I found that both sons of a previous owner died in WWI and decided I wanted to go and pay my respects but then started to look into my own family only to find Sapper Fred which has now taken over. Looks like I'm going to have a lot of reading before I head over there.

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