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Remembered Today:

Looking for Timothy and James Kayes


Guest lynmath
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My uncle, James Kayes, was a Private in the 8th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders who served in France 1915/18. He survived the war but nothing is known of his army career other than that he may have been at the Somme in August 1916. Any clues would be apprefciated. Also, Timothy Kayes, possibly a cousin of James was a Private with the Scottish Rifles Reg. No 27814 from 1915. I do not know if he survived the war and, again any clues to his fate would be appreciated.

Thank you

Evelyn

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Description Medal card of Kayes, James

Corps Regiment No Rank

Seaforth Highlanders S/2729 Private

Date 1914-1920

Catalogue reference WO 372/11

Description Medal card of Kayes, Timothy

Corps Regiment No Rank

Scottish Rifles 27814 Private

Royal Defence Corps 76248 Private

Date 1914-1920

Catalogue reference WO 372/11

CWGC website suggests he survived and the pro shows he served in the home Royal defence Corps.

Gareth

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Thank you for that information Gareth. Could you tell me what the home Royal Defence Corps was and where they served?

Thank you

Evelyn

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Hi Evelyn. Im no expert on this subject but the RDC I beleive was a home defence unit which served in the UK only, this of course would have included Ireland (before partition) which opens a whole can of worms.

The Royal Defence Corps was formed in August 1917 from the Home Service Garrison Battalions of 18 Regiments. It was made up of old soldiers who were beyond the age set for combatant service in the First World War, unlike the younger, volunteer soldiers at the Front. The Corps was similar in some ways to the Home Guard of the Second World War. Its job was to guard railways, tunnels, roads and ports, thus relieving other troops for front line service.

(BBC online website)

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Evelyn

I'm not sure whether you have carried out any research on the 8th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, so apologies if what I provide below is already known to you.

The 8th was a K2 Service battalion formed at Fort George in September 1914. For the duration of the war it was part of the 44th Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division.

The 8th participated in the 1916 Battle of the Somme from late July to early November 1916. Here is a summary of its participation taken from Ray Westlake's book British Battalions on the Somme.

Arrived Gezaincourt from Bethune area (28/7). To Naours (31/7), Mirvaux (4/9), Lahoussoye (5/8), bivouacs just east of Albert (8/8), Scots Redoubt (14/8), Peake Wood and Contalmaison (16/8). Moved forward to front line (17/8) - in action at Switch Elbow - detachment joining 7th Cameron Highlanders and driving enemy back. Relieved and to Scots Redoubt (20/8). Casualties since (17/8) - 210. To Peake Wood (22/8), Contalmaison (24/8), front line (26/8), Scots Redoubt (28/8), bivouacs east of Albert (30/8), Scots Redoubt (4/9). Moved forward and in reserve during operations around High Wood (5/9) - (13/9). Relieved and to bivouacs east of Becourt Wood. To Contalmaison and Peake Wood (14/9). Moved forward and in operations around Martinpuich (16/9) - (18/9). Withdrew to bivouacs east of Albert. To Lavieville (19/9), Franvillers (20/9), Becourt Wood (6/10). Moved forward to trenches Le Sars sector (8/10). Relieved and to Martinpuich (15/10), Bazentin-le-Petit (18/10). To support trenches - Prue, Martin, Starfish (21/10), front line (24/10), support line (26/10), Contalmaison (28/10), Becourt (1/11), Bresle (5/11).(pp263-264)

Hope this assists

Chris

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Hi Welshdoc and Ceebee

Thank you gentlemen for your responses. Yes the RDC in Ireland does indeed open a can of worms as Timothy Kayes was an Irishman and, if he was like the rest of my family, would have been of the Republican persuasion! No matter, many of that persuasion fought bravely in the British Army.

The information on the movements of the 8th Battalion is much appreciated and certainly does add some meat to the bare bones of my research.

Many thanks

Evelyn

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