Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

English Professor or genius needed,


museumtom
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi Guys.

I have written an introduction for a book and I need a volunteer who is fantastic at proof reading and putting things in their correct order etc.

It is a total of 2 pages.

Any volunteers? My undying gratitude is there for the taking if you can help me out.

Kind regards.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Guys.

I have written an introduction for a book and I need a volunteer who is fantastic at proof reading and putting things in their correct order etc.

It is a total of 2 pages.

Any volunteers? My undying gratitude is there for the taking if you can help me out.

Kind regards.

Tom.

Tom

I was a professional editor and, provided you don't want it back this year, should be able to look at within three or four days of receipt. You may prefer to wait a couple of days to see if you get other offers from people you know better. I shall email you my email address via the Forum.

Moonraker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will pm the text to members who offer to help.

Many thanks.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Prize for the best result?'

Why not?, the problem is who will be the judge? If I had the brains to judge the final result I would'nt need any help at this at all.

The prize will be a hard cover copy of 'Goodbye to all that' by Robert Graves.

I ask the forum moderator to choose the winner, and I will post the introduction and the two corrected ones on the forum if that is acceptable to Moonraker and Tom Morgan.

Regards.

Tom.

Edited by museumtom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the introduction;

The Anglicized words of Irish placenames.

In a broad sense this book is an Anglicized Irish place-name dictionary, not a book of Irish place names per-se, but a breakdown of the Anglicized (English-ified) Irish wordings used to form most Irish place names.

In this book I have collected all the available place names in their Anglicized form and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule Anglicised placenames are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording

The modern spelling of some places may differ somewhat since their meaning was recorded.

(a) Should a place name lose relevant letters were it split, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

(B) Bi-lingual and foreign wordings of Irish place names are included (as found) with the translation.

© Should differing versions (not mine) of a place name translation exist, they are included as found.

(d) English placenames of Irish locations are not generally included i.e, Michaels field or Middle third etc, unless they are particularly interesting.

(e) I do not offer my opinions nor translations, what you see is what is found. However if a spelling might appear like a typo, obvious error, a curious variation, or a questionable translation (sic) is placed beside it.

(f) When an Irish version of the place name has two or more words I have adopted the style of P.W.Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

(g) Where a translation is given as another Irish wording it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italic.

(h) When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

(i)

I have taken a few of the longest townland names to give the reader an insight into how most placenames are Anglicized.

(1)

Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is;

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus;

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach, a piggery or a pig feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar, between.

Dav, dau, two.

Halia, haile, briny inlet/s.

Meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

(2).

Crompaunvealduark, Is split thus; Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place is;

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus;

Crompaun, crompán, a little creek.

Veal, bél, mouth.

Duark, duairc, surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

(3).

Muingatlaunlusk, Muing-a tlaunlusk.

Irish; muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga, a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis, the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

(3) Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc, little creek of the surly mouth.

Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin, its back turned to Ireland.

Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin, back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh, rock of the cormorants.

Here is the first corrected version;

1. no need for capital A to be "anglicised";

2. "English-ified" is a bit clumsy, so have re-worded

3. The use of a, b, c and 1, 2, 3 make for a "manual"appearance. I suggest you indent these various points, perhaps using a blob (I've had to use an *.)

4. I suggest colons rather than commas or semi-colons in the second half.

5. Is "townland" one word?

6. Wasn't sure why this occurred twice at the end: "Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford."

7. No need for full stops after initials.

The anglicized words of Irish place names

In a broad sense this book is an anglicized Irish place-name dictionary. It is not a book of Irish place names per se, but a breakdown of the English forms of Irish wordings used in most Irish place names.

I have collected all the available place names in their anglicized form and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule anglicised place names are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording.

The modern spelling of some places may differ somewhat since their meaning was recorded:

* Should a place name have been split and lose relevant letters, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

* Bilingual and foreign wordings of Irish place names are included (as found) with the translation.

* Should differing versions (not mine) of a place-name translation exist, they are included as found.

* English place names of Irish locations are not generally included, eg Michaels field or Middle third, unless they are particularly interesting.

* I do not offer my opinions nor translations; what you see is what I have found. However if a spelling might appear to be a typographical mistake, obvious error, a curious variation or a questionable translation, sic is placed beside it.

* When an Irish version of the place name has two or more words, I have adopted the style of P W Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

* Where a translation is given as another Irish wording, it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italic.

* When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation, it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

A few of the longest townland names give the reader an insight into how most place names are anglicized:

* Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is:

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus:

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach: a piggery or a pig-feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar: between.

Dav, dau: two.

Halia, haile: briny inlets.

meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

* Crompaunvealduark is split thus: Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place name is:

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus:

Crompaun, crompán: a little creek.

Veal, bél: mouth.

Duark, duairc: surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

* Muingatlaunlusk is split thus: Muing-a tlaunlusk.

In Irish this place name is: muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga: a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis: the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

* Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford.

* Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc: little creek of the surly mouth.

* Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin: its back turned to Ireland.

* Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford.

* Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin: back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh: rock of the cormorants.

and here is the second version;

The Anglicized Words of Irish Place-names. See Note 2

In a broad sense, this book is an anglicized Irish place-name dictionary; not a book of Irish place-names per no dash se, but a breakdown of the anglicized (English-ified) Irish wordings used to form most Irish place-names.

I think I would go for, “…. this book is a dictionary of anglicized Irish place-names;”

In this book I have collected all the available place-names in their anglicized forms and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule, anglicised place-names are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording.

The modern spelling of some places may have changed somewhat since their meaning was recorded.

(a) Should a place-name lose relevant letters were it to be split, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

(B) Bi-lingual and foreign wordings of Irish place-names are included (as found) with their translations.

© Should differing versions (not mine) of a place-name translation exist, they are included as found.

(d) English place-names of Irish locations are not generally included i.e., Michael’s Field or Middle Third etc., unless they are particularly interesting.

(e) I offer neither my opinions nor translations; what you see is what is found. However. if a spelling might appear like a typo, obvious error, a curious variation, or a questionable translation, then (sic) <Tom, I suggest italics> is placed beside it.

(f) When an Irish version of the place-name has two or more words, I have adopted the style of P.<space>W.<space> Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

(g) Where a translation is given as another Irish wording, it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italics.

Not sure what you mean here, Tom. Which word is in italics – the original name or the new translation into other Irish wording?

(h) When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation, it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

(i) Nothing here…….

I have taken a few of the longest townland names to give the reader an insight into how most place-names are anglicized.

(1)

Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is;

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus;

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach, a piggery or a pig feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar, between.

Dav, dau, two.

Halia, haile, briny inlet/s.

Meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

(2).

Crompaunvealduark, Is split thus; Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place is;

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus;

Crompaun, crompán, a little creek.

Veal, bél, mouth.

Duark, duairc, surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

What about adopting the convention of giving the Irish component-words in Italics:

(3).

Muingatlaunlusk, Muing-a tlaunlusk.

Irish; muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga, a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis, the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

(3) Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc, little creek of the surly mouth.

Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin, its back turned to Ireland.

Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford. You say it means something else a little earlier.

Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin, back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh, rock of the cormorants.

Notes:

1 “Anglicised” is an adjective, and adjectives don’t have capital letters unless they are at the start of a sentence.

2 If this is a title, then, then the general rule is to give all nouns capital letters such as “Treasure Island” or “The Mill on the Floss”. (“The” also has a capital here as it’s the first word).

It all reads very clearly. I’ve only suggested minor changes, as you’ll see.

Now then moderator young fella me lad, which one gets the prize?

Regards.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the introduction;

The Anglicized words of Irish placenames.

In a broad sense this book is an Anglicized Irish place-name dictionary, not a book of Irish place names per-se, but a breakdown of the Anglicized (English-ified) Irish wordings used to form most Irish place names.

In this book I have collected all the available place names in their Anglicized form and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule Anglicised placenames are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording

The modern spelling of some places may differ somewhat since their meaning was recorded.

(a) Should a place name lose relevant letters were it split, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

(B) Bi-lingual and foreign wordings of Irish place names are included (as found) with the translation.

© Should differing versions (not mine) of a place name translation exist, they are included as found.

(d) English placenames of Irish locations are not generally included i.e, Michaels field or Middle third etc, unless they are particularly interesting.

(e) I do not offer my opinions nor translations, what you see is what is found. However if a spelling might appear like a typo, obvious error, a curious variation, or a questionable translation (sic) is placed beside it.

(f) When an Irish version of the place name has two or more words I have adopted the style of P.W.Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

(g) Where a translation is given as another Irish wording it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italic.

(h) When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

(i)

I have taken a few of the longest townland names to give the reader an insight into how most placenames are Anglicized.

(1)

Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is;

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus;

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach, a piggery or a pig feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar, between.

Dav, dau, two.

Halia, haile, briny inlet/s.

Meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

(2).

Crompaunvealduark, Is split thus; Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place is;

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus;

Crompaun, crompán, a little creek.

Veal, bél, mouth.

Duark, duairc, surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

(3).

Muingatlaunlusk, Muing-a tlaunlusk.

Irish; muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga, a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis, the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

(3) Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc, little creek of the surly mouth.

Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin, its back turned to Ireland.

Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin, back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh, rock of the cormorants.

Here is the first corrected version;

1. no need for capital A to be "anglicised";

2. "English-ified" is a bit clumsy, so have re-worded

3. The use of a, b, c and 1, 2, 3 make for a "manual"appearance. I suggest you indent these various points, perhaps using a blob (I've had to use an *.)

4. I suggest colons rather than commas or semi-colons in the second half.

5. Is "townland" one word?

6. Wasn't sure why this occurred twice at the end: "Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford."

7. No need for full stops after initials.

The anglicized words of Irish place names

In a broad sense this book is an anglicized Irish place-name dictionary. It is not a book of Irish place names per se, but a breakdown of the English forms of Irish wordings used in most Irish place names.

I have collected all the available place names in their anglicized form and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule anglicised place names are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording.

The modern spelling of some places may differ somewhat since their meaning was recorded:

* Should a place name have been split and lose relevant letters, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

* Bilingual and foreign wordings of Irish place names are included (as found) with the translation.

* Should differing versions (not mine) of a place-name translation exist, they are included as found.

* English place names of Irish locations are not generally included, eg Michaels field or Middle third, unless they are particularly interesting.

* I do not offer my opinions nor translations; what you see is what I have found. However if a spelling might appear to be a typographical mistake, obvious error, a curious variation or a questionable translation, sic is placed beside it.

* When an Irish version of the place name has two or more words, I have adopted the style of P W Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

* Where a translation is given as another Irish wording, it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italic.

* When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation, it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

A few of the longest townland names give the reader an insight into how most place names are anglicized:

* Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is:

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus:

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach: a piggery or a pig-feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar: between.

Dav, dau: two.

Halia, haile: briny inlets.

meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

* Crompaunvealduark is split thus: Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place name is:

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus:

Crompaun, crompán: a little creek.

Veal, bél: mouth.

Duark, duairc: surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

* Muingatlaunlusk is split thus: Muing-a tlaunlusk.

In Irish this place name is: muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga: a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis: the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

* Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford.

* Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc: little creek of the surly mouth.

* Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin: its back turned to Ireland.

* Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise: narrow quarter of the green ford.

* Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin: back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh: rock of the cormorants.

and here is the second version;

The Anglicized Words of Irish Place-names. See Note 2

In a broad sense, this book is an anglicized Irish place-name dictionary; not a book of Irish place-names per no dash se, but a breakdown of the anglicized (English-ified) Irish wordings used to form most Irish place-names.

I think I would go for, “…. this book is a dictionary of anglicized Irish place-names;”

In this book I have collected all the available place-names in their anglicized forms and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule, anglicised place-names are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording.

The modern spelling of some places may have changed somewhat since their meaning was recorded.

(a) Should a place-name lose relevant letters were it to be split, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

(B) Bi-lingual and foreign wordings of Irish place-names are included (as found) with their translations.

© Should differing versions (not mine) of a place-name translation exist, they are included as found.

(d) English place-names of Irish locations are not generally included i.e., Michael’s Field or Middle Third etc., unless they are particularly interesting.

(e) I offer neither my opinions nor translations; what you see is what is found. However. if a spelling might appear like a typo, obvious error, a curious variation, or a questionable translation, then (sic) <Tom, I suggest italics> is placed beside it.

(f) When an Irish version of the place-name has two or more words, I have adopted the style of P.<space>W.<space> Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

(g) Where a translation is given as another Irish wording, it is included in plain text beside the Irish word in italics.

Not sure what you mean here, Tom. Which word is in italics – the original name or the new translation into other Irish wording?

(h) When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation, it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

(i) Nothing here…….

I have taken a few of the longest townland names to give the reader an insight into how most place-names are anglicized.

(1)

Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is;

muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus;

Muckinagh, muiceannach, muiceanach, a piggery or a pig feeding place.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar, between.

Dav, dau, two.

Halia, haile, briny inlet/s.

Meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

(2).

Crompaunvealduark, Is split thus; Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place is;

crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus;

Crompaun, crompán, a little creek.

Veal, bél, mouth.

Duark, duairc, surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

What about adopting the convention of giving the Irish component-words in Italics:

(3).

Muingatlaunlusk, Muing-a tlaunlusk.

Irish; muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga, a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis, the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

(3) Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford.

Crompaunvealduark, crompán-bél-duairc, little creek of the surly mouth.

Cuilnaheron, Cuil-le-h-Eirin, its back turned to Ireland.

Carrowkeelanahaglass, ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise, narrow quarter of the green ford. You say it means something else a little earlier.

Coollegreane, cúl-le-gréin, back to the sun.

Corragaunnacalliaghdoo, corragán-na-gcalliagh-dubh, rock of the cormorants.

Notes:

1 “Anglicised” is an adjective, and adjectives don’t have capital letters unless they are at the start of a sentence.

2 If this is a title, then, then the general rule is to give all nouns capital letters such as “Treasure Island” or “The Mill on the Floss”. (“The” also has a capital here as it’s the first word).

It all reads very clearly. I’ve only suggested minor changes, as you’ll see.

Now then moderator young fella me lad, which one gets the prize?

Regards.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is fascinating work.

I'm wondering, is it possible to use the original Irish names to develop an understanding of the chronology of settlement patterns across Ireland? I concluded a project many years ago of outlining the settlement chronology of North East Derbyshire through Celtic, Romano-British, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Norman phases etc. I would imagine that my project, based on several clearly distinguishable languages, would be a lot easier than a project based on just one - but just wondering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see where you are going and it sounds like a very worthwhile project but not for me. However if you go to

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Irish-Placename-Studies

the guys there are more into that sort of thing and could advise you better than I.

I would also like to add that the Irish wording WAS in italic before I posted them here but it seems that the forum does not support that type of font. Maybe I am wrong.

Regards.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Muckinagh, ... a piggery or a pig feeding place.

That's a language I can understand. A similar process was used when a name was chosen for Grimsby. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was hoping the moderator would jump in and decide who would get the prize and save me the gut-wrenching, tear-jerking, sould-searching, pushed to the ultimate limit decision. So here goes, there were two members who generously offered their services, Moonraker and I have decided to award the prize to Moonraker (Terry). This does not in any way detract from the efforts from Tom Morgan, I was not in a position to really jidge this anyway. The reason I opted for Moonraker is that I took the most suggestions from his rendition. Many thanks to Terry and comiserations to Tom.

Here is the final product I have decided on, the italics where there before I posted it.

The Anglicised Words of Irish Place-names.

In a broad sense this book is an anglicised Irish place-name dictionary. It is not a book of Irish place names per se, but a breakdown of the English forms of Irish wordings used in most Irish place names.

I have collected all the available place names in their anglicised form and split them into their relevant single words. Beside these I have added the corresponding Irish word or words followed by the English translation.

As a rule anglicised place names are based on the phonetic version of the Gaelic wording, however there are always exceptions.

The modern spelling of some places may differ somewhat since their meaning was recorded.

* Should a place name have been split and lose relevant letters, it is included in its entirety with the full translation beside it.

* Bilingual and foreign wordings of Irish place names are included (as found) with the translation.

* Should differing versions (not mine) of a place-name translation exist, they are included as found.

* English place names of Irish locations are not generally included, eg Michaels field or Middle third, unless they are particularly interesting.

* I do not offer my opinions nor translations; what you see is what I have found. However if a spelling might appear to be a typographical mistake, obvious error, a curious variation or a questionable translation, (sic) is placed beside it.

* When an Irish version of the place name has two or more words, I have adopted the style of P W Joyce and separated the words with dashes.

* When an Irish translation occurs without an explanation, it is noted ‘not given’ even though it may be obvious to all what the translation is.

A few of the longest place-names give the reader an insight into how most place names are anglicised:

* Muckanaghederdavhalia is split thus; Muckanagh-eder-dav-halia.

In Irish this place name is:

Muiceannach-eder-dau-haile, and is split thus:

Muckanagh, muiceannach, muiceanach: a place of pigs, a pig feeding place or a piggery.

Eder, eder, dir, eadar: between.

Dav, dau: two.

Halia, haile: briny inlets.

Meaning the ‘piggery between two briny inlets’.

* Crompaunvealduark is split thus: Crompaun-veal-duark.

In Irish this place name is:

Crompán-bél-duairc, and is split thus:

Crompaun, crompán: a little creek.

Veal, bél: mouth.

Duark, duairc: surly.

Meaning the ‘little creek of the surly mouth’.

* Muingatlaunlusk is split thus: Muing-a tlaunlusk.

In Irish this place name is: muing-a’tslanluis.

Muing, muing, muinga: a sedgy place, a morass.

Atlaunlusk, a’tslanluis: the rib grass.

Meaning the ‘sedgy place of the rib grass’.

* Carrowkeelanahaglass is split thus: carrow-keel-an-aha-glass.

In Irish this place name is: ceathramha-caol-an-atha-glaise:

Carrow, ceathrú, ceathru, ceathramha, ceathramhadh: a quarter of land.

Keel, caol, caola, cael: narrow/slender.

An, an: the word ‘the’.

Aha, átha, atha, ath: a ford.

Glass, ghlais, glaise, glas: green or a green place.

Meaning the ‘narrow quarter of the green ford’.

* Corragaunnacalliaghdoo is split thus: Corragaun-na-calliagh-doo

In Irish this place name is: Corragán-na-gCalliagh-dubh.

Corragaun, corragán: rock.

Na, na, …..of the (plural)…

Calliaghdoo, gCalliagh-dubh: literally ‘black hags’ or cormorants.

Meaning the ‘rock of the cormorants’.

Many thanks again for all your help.

Regards.

Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...