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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Interesting Monument


Roy Evans
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I spotted this monument on a recent visit, what does anyone know about it?

Roy

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Here is the inscription

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Roy - looks like a fairly standard local town/village memorial to its Great War Dead. Some of them are indeed very good and sculptors, bronze foundries etc must have done very well in post war France (and Britain for that matter)

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It's, as Ian suggests, the local war memorial for those from Monchy le Preux who died. It makes mention (on the other side to that shown in the photos) of the people of the Isle of Wight who 'adopted' Monchy when it was being rebuilt in the 1920s.

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Thank you all for your replies, that's another query answered then!

Roy

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What does that mean? Did children die fighting for their country? Or is it commemorating those children who died as a result of enemy bombings? Or did something unusual go on in that town that prompted them to put this memorial up? Just wondering, as it is very unusual to dedicate a WW1 memoria to children isn't it it? Perhaps an orpanage was bombed or something? Very touching statue though. Nice photo.

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In France, the 'children' of a village or town are the people born there: this is not a direct reference to young children, as such - it refers to the natives of Monchy who died.

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I've thought about this too, but I always assumed that 'children' was used as a term of endearment for the citizens of all ages.

Andy

PS.... Paul's message appeared as I was writing this.

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I've thought about this too, but I always assumed that 'children' was used as a term of endearment for the citizens of all ages.

Andy

PS.... Paul's message appeared as I was writing this.

First line of " La Marseillaise" . " Allons enfants de la patrie ". Since France is the motherland, her citizens are her children.

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Interesting, I'd have never thought of that. The village children who grew into adults to fight and die in the war. Unusual concept. Thanks for explaining that.

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Hi all

I have a book published by the archive service of pas de calais, called "memoires de pierre", or "memories in stone". Every village and commune in pas de calais received a circular on 14th june 1920 asking them to erect a memorial to the war dead. More than 85% were built by local firms using local stone or concrete and following certain basic principles to do with symbols used (ie non religious), type, size and position of monument. These local firms produced catalogues for prospective buyers! thus you may see the same style in more than one place.

liz

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