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Edward Shell, 1st Dorsets?


dunmore44
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I am after any info on L/Cpl 6738 Edward Shell, 1st Dorset Regiment

I know that he Landed in France on the 16 Aug 1914 and that he was awarded the 1914 star with clasp

thats all the info i have. can anyone help.

Also how many men from the 1st Dorsets embarked for France on 16 Aug 1914 and out of that number how many of the men became casualties.?

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Simon,

The 1914 star roll for the Dorsetshire Regt contains 1991 names. Of these 1075 disembarked at Le Havre on 16-8-14 i.e. "The First Contingent". However there were 6 men who made it over before this date, the first 3 landing on 9th August 1914. Therefore the Bn which took to the field at Mons numbered some 1081 strong.

Analysis of the roll shows that out of the 1081 original contingent...

222 were Killed in Action (21%)

43 Died of Wounds (4%)

15 Died (1%)

236 were Prisoners of War (22%)

107 were Discharged Medically Unfit (10%)

46 were Discharged Time Expired (4%)

140 were transferred (13%)

17 were commissioned (2%)

8 are listed as having deserted (0.75%)

The remaining 247 appear to have made it through to the end of the war, intact.

Regards

Steve

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Simon,

The 1914 star roll for the Dorsetshire Regt contains 1991 names. Of these 1075 disembarked at Le Havre on 16-8-14 i.e. "The First Contingent". However there were 6 men who made it over before this date, the first 3 landing on 9th August 1914. Therefore the Bn which took to the field at Mons numbered some 1081 strong.

Analysis of the roll shows that out of the 1081 original contingent...

222 were Killed in Action (21%)

43 Died of Wounds (4%)

15 Died (1%)

236 were Prisoners of War (22%)

107 were Discharged Medically Unfit (10%)

46 were Discharged Time Expired (4%)

140 were transferred (13%)

17 were commissioned (2%)

8 are listed as having deserted (0.75%)

The remaining 247 appear to have made it through to the end of the war, intact.

Regards

Steve

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Steve

many thanks

you have obviously done your research

have a nice christmas

Simon

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  • 2 months later...

Shelley,

The 1914 Star Roll for the Dorsets is available at the National Archives under reference WO 329/2457. I have photocopied the complete Roll and have transferred it to an excel spreadsheet for statistical analysis.

The entry for your Great Grandfather is as follows:

7023 Pte CASSONMAN H

Date of Entry : 27-8-14

Comments : Died 21-4-15

There is no notation that he was issued with the Aug-Nov bar, though he may well have met the qualifying criteria.

What do you know about him? I would be interested to hear from you.

Regards

Steve

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Guest Shelley Williams

Hi Steve,

Thanks for that. Does date of entry mean the day he joined the army?

To be honest I don't know if I do a lot about him, I know of a few addresses he lived at.

I do know he came over from the Ukaraine in the 1880's, it was Russia back then though. They came over as Kesselman but changed their name to Cassonman, though the 1901 census says Casterman, they did change their name back to Kesselman, but we think because Harris already had his name as Cassonman on official papers, he just kept the Cassonman name.

He was a Hat Butler. He and his family came to live in the East End. What is strange is that I am not from London, but it seems a lot of places I have had interest in or places I have lived have connections with my ancestors, and I never even knew it, like I used to live near the cemetery where my great grandmother is buried and never knew, I go a lot to Southend without realising that when I come out of the train station I am stepping on the road where my great grandmother lived after my great grandfather died in the war.

He joined the Royal Regiment of Artiliary in 1901, then after about three months was discharged, the papers say it was because he lied about his age, but I have since been told it could have been the fact he was Russian, and spoke with a non english accent! He did lie about his age, by about 3 years.

He married in 1908 to Fanny Vinacour who was from Lithuania, also Russia back then. They had three children, Sarah 1909, Doris 1911, Edith 1912 and Michael 1914 who died in 1915 at 10 months old, a month before Harris, Harris also was home at that time as he was the informant on the birth certificate.

I have Harris' death certificate.

He was also awarded these Medals:

Victory - Roll: C/2/101 B3 P:140

British - Roll: C/2/101 B3 P:140

14 Star - Roll: C?/2/5 P: 21

What does these Roll and Page No.'s mean?

I have learnt a bit more about his last days, by coming on here and people have been kind enough to give me some information of what they know, whether it is by dairies of an ancestor who was in the same regiment, or by details they have looked up in books, which is good.

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Shelley,

Just a quick reply for now.

The Date of Entry above is the date he landed in France (as one of the first reinforcements to the 1st Battalion, which had landed on the 16th August, and had gone through Mons and Le Cateau and were on 'The Retreat' by the time Harris caught up with them.

His Regimental Number, 7023 would indicate he enlisted into the Regiment around 10th November 1903.

I'll answer your other questions later.

Regards

Steve

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Guest Shelley Williams

Thanks Steve, I can only assume when he left for France, that was the last time he saw his family and they saw him.

If he enlisted in 1903 he waited a long time before he actually went to war, I wonder if he and his family hoped he wouldn't go after waiting for so long?

Shelley :)

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  • 2 years later...

Bumping this thread

I have a photo of his grave which I took in the Spring in Woods Cemetery near Ypres. I was there as it was the sector on which my grandfather was fatally wounded and I thought that if there were any other casualties from the same period then they might be there - your great grandfather was killed on the same day that my grandfather was wounded, so who knows they may have been standing next to each other!

If you want a copy of he photo then PM me with and email address and I'll send it to you

andy

Shelley,

The 1914 Star Roll for the Dorsets is available at the National Archives under reference WO 329/2457. I have photocopied the complete Roll and have transferred it to an excel spreadsheet for statistical analysis.

The entry for your Great Grandfather is as follows:

7023 Pte CASSONMAN H

Date of Entry : 27-8-14

Comments : Died 21-4-15

There is no notation that he was issued with the Aug-Nov bar, though he may well have met the qualifying criteria.

What do you know about him? I would be interested to hear from you.

Regards

Steve

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