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North Russian Expeditionary Force

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wrightdw

All covered in extensive detail in my upcoming book:

 

http://www.helion.co.uk/new-and-forthcoming-titles/churchill-s-secret-war-with-lenin-british-and-commonwealth-military-intervention-in-the-russian-civil-war-1918-20.html

 

I will make a more detailed post on the books release in about a week but just wanted to post something here in the meantime.

A1fTNMduAmL.jpg

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MartH

Hi Damien looks very good, I have ordered is there much about actions with the Finns and the Operations from Briojko Sound?

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wrightdw

Hi Mart, yes operations against 'White Finns' in Karelia, April-May 1918 is covered as well as the British raised, trained and equipped 'Finnish Legion' or sarcastically 'King's Own Bolsheviks' who were Red Finns recruited by the British to fight the White Finns in Karelia although the Red Finns would not take up arms against the Bolsheviks. The Finnish Legion was placed under the command of a Canadian, Major R.B.S. Burton, Manitoba Regiment. The Finnish Legion project ultimately ended in failure with the British government negotiating repatriation of the Finns back to 'White Finland' although a few 'bad eggs' were not granted permission to return to Finland and emigrated to Canada.

 

British operations in Finland during 1919 are also extensively covered including operations of RAF aircraft from aircraft carrier HMS Vindictive which operated from a small airstrip at Koivisto as well as the operation of RN Coastal Motor Boats from Terrioki yacht club and the RN Eastern Baltic Fleet anchorage at Biorko (the phonetic spelling I use in the book).

 

The first British gallantry decoration awarded for the campaign was a Distinguished Service Cross to Captain Vincent Brown, RMA (who had served with the RMA Siege Guns on the Western Front), awarded for action with White Finns 10-12 May 1918 near Pechenga on the Murmank Peninsula. Brown was also wounded during the engagement.

 

 

 

Edited by wrightdw

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MartH

Hi Damien

Fantastic! My Grandfather was at Terijoki as a translator, he had learnt English from captured Irish when training in Germany. Apparently it had one of the best beaches in the world. I look forward to the book.  

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Maureene

Chapters on the medical aspects and general history of 

American Expeditionary Forces in North Russia page 945

https://archive.org/stream/WW1ArmyMedDeptHistV8#page/n983/mode/2up and 

American Expeditionary Forces in Siberia page 955

https://archive.org/stream/WW1ArmyMedDeptHistV8#page/n991/mode/2up

 

from The Medical Department of the United States Army in the World War volume 8: Field Operations 1925 Archive.org

 

There are some references to the British Army

 

Cheers

Maureen

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laughton

My attempt to answer this question, as it dealt with the Canadian operations in North Russia and Siberia:

 

The First Cold War: CEF in Siberia and North Russia (R. Laughton, December 2012)

 

Interestingly, there was another post about this I responded to within the last hour.  I am not an author by any means, but when I come across a topic that I know nothing about and start to research, I generally make notes and then assemble them into a summary document.

 

Are the Canadians covered in Damien's book? I see the summary says:

Quote

nor that the last Canadian and Australian soldiers to die in the First World War suffered their fate in North Russia in 1919

 

Perhaps this book will also be available in Canada?

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wrightdw

Yes, Churchill's Secret War with Lenin: British and Commonwealth Military Intervention in the Russian Civil War 1918-20 covers Canadian operations in Russia extensively including Canadian Malamute Company at Murmansk, North Russia, 16th Brigade, CFA at Archangel, North Russia (including Canadian RAF aircrew in North Russia) as well as CSEF in Siberia. Operations in South Russian and Crimea 1919-20 are also covered in some detail, a number of Canadian pilots and Observers served with No. 47 Sqn., RAF in South Russia and the Crimea 1919-20, the squadron commander was none other than Raymond Collishaw, 60 kill-ace over the Western Front. There is some conjecture wether or not he claimed a 61st kill over Russia, there were a number of RAF vs Soviet Air Force encounters 1919-20.

 

For North Americans the book will be available from the following vendors (there may be more vendors, these are the ones I know of at the moment):

 

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/ChurchillS-Secret-War-Lenin-Commonwealth/dp/1911512102

Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/churchills-secret-war-with-lenin-damien-wright/1124454527?ean=9781911512103

 

Other than Amazon.ca, I am not sure at this point of vendors in Canada although I am sure it will be available from Canadian vendors.

 

The book will also be available from vendors in Australia and UK.

 

Edited by wrightdw

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MikeMeech

Hi

WW1NRussia1919002.jpg.40ed05eb0446b2c51b2b62dd72416d83.jpg

The above is from the IWM (Q16303)  it contains information on ground signals used  in conjunction with aeroplanes, dated 1st June 1919, and issued by GHQ Allied Forces, Archangel.  My question is that this system differs from systems used by the British and French on the Western Front and other Theatres.  In Italy the British and French would use the Italian system when working in conjunction with Italian ground forces, so is the system illustrated actually the system used by the Russian Army during WW1?

If anyone can confirm or otherwise I would be most interested.

 

Many thanks

Mike

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Maureene

I came across the following online book

Archangel : the American War with Russia  by a Chronicler 1924.

The author elsewhere is stated to be John Clarence Cudahy

https://archive.org/details/archangelamerica00bych 

 

The initial chapters of the following book concern the political situation  in Russia WW1 period, and the role of British agents.

https://archive.org/details/HIST3750GreatConspiracyAgainstRussia

The Great Conspiracy Against Russia by Michael Sayers and Albert E. Kahn 1946 Archive.org 

 

Cheers

Maureen

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Maureene

More online books

Army. The Evacuation of North Russia, 1919 presented to Parliament and published by HMSO, 1920

https://archive.org/details/armyevacuationof00greauoft

 

Fighting Without a War; an account of military intervention in North Russia by Ralph Albertson 1920

https://archive.org/details/historyofamerica00moor

 

The History of the American Expedition fighting the Bolsheviki: Campaigning in North Russia 1918-1919

by Joel R Moore; Harry H Mead; Lewis E Jahns 1920

https://archive.org/details/historyofamerica00moor

 

Cheers

Maureen

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Maureene

Cross referencing of Information posted on another topic recently.

Another online book

Page 139, A memoir of Lt.-Col. Edward Anthony Steel, RHA and RFA, 1880-1919 : consisting chiefly of his letters and diaries with numerous illustrations 1921 Archive.org.

https://archive.org/stream/memoirofltcoledw00steeiala#page/138/mode/2up

Steel was posted to Vladivostok from Mesopotamia and  died 17 October 1919 in Omsk, of influenza.

 

This book was mentioned recently on another topic.

Cheers

Maureen

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Keith_history_buff

An interesting online article with regard to the US contingent in North Russia, and their use of Moisin Nagant rifles manufactured by Remington
https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2018/7/25/cold-front-american-troops-in-russia-1918-1919/

 

I presume the Browning Automatic Rifle did not get used, and that the Lewis Gun was sourced via the British logistics chain?

Thanks, Keith


 

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AlanD

Look like British Lewis guns to me, with the oiler in the butt.

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