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Tim Brecknock

Medal Collectors

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Terry_Reeves

I have a medal collection and I see no shame in it whatsoever. They have been disposed of by the recipients themselves or by their families. How many of those who criticise this pastime I wonder, have photographs of soldiers, sailors or airmen that they have bought from dealers, or personal diaries, letters or other paperwork? A glasshouse is not the place to throw stones.

TR

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Jesse

This speaks to my earlier point, and is why, for example, German Soldbuchs are more desireable than Wehrpasses. The Soldbuch was actually always in the breast pocket of that soldier, thru thick and thin. A medal is really an after-the-fact item for service personnel, almost like a memorial.

That is the one thing I, {even as an avid Collector of Medals} find hard to equate,Medals per se are in the main, records of after the event,save for the early days of the Imperial Armies of Victoria,rarely worn in Battle or on Service,& consequently only associated to the recipient once the fighting has stopped!!,they have little if any relation to the events that the recipient went through,unlike items of personal kit,badges,uniform,headwear,letters & documents,They are but a physical record of previous doings & often the only tangible thing left that proves a Man or Womans existence & I in all honesty suppose that is the reason I collect them,but there is very little logic to it if you sit down and think about it..... :blush::poppy:

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rfishbobs

Having searched unsuccessfully for my grandfathers ( Joseph Garret Fisher) medals I decided to puchase a'pair' at a market for the princely sum of £38. Once I got them home I managed to track down a relative who remembered him and was able to let me have a couple of pictures of one of our brave soldiers. I sent the medals to him, which were duly framed and placed on a wall in his house. I got a tremendous amount of pleasure out of this and a new friend. What a bargain!

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auchonvillerssomme
Sadly, some susceptible or frail people are easily taken in by plausible talk and the offer of instant cash on the doorstep.

Gwyn

On the other side of that I used to buy and sell to a jeweller in Darlington who was one of a few dealers scammed by an old lady who brought in a bag of silver including a choice MGS group, he offerred her the scrap value but she said she wanted a bit bit more because the medals were grandads along with a sob story about bills to pay, he offerred quite a bit more and she went away to think about it. She returned half hour later and accepted his offer and off she toddled. When he looked in the bag the medals had been swapped with a couple of bwms and a defence. Serve him right.

When I told that story to a dealer in London a few years later he said the lady and her family were well known and had even been seen on the Antiques Roadshow.

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River97

As much as I have tried to resist posting on this thread, you lot have got me as I think most of you are missing the point here.

There are two types of people who come in contact with medals:

a. Those who buy and sell for the monetary value and to make some sort of living from them, and

b. Those who purchase medals to restore, research, remount and care for the little pieces of metal.

Those who fall under a. are known as dealers and those who come under b. are known as collectors.

As a person who falls under category b. I am well aware that these are not black and white cases. Collectors sell medals to raise funds to improve on the theme they have chosen and there are also dealers who combine both category a. and b. and have some beautiful web sites. There are also dealers who blatantly over inflate the asking price for their medals in the hope that they will rope in someone new to the hobby. As much as I don't like it, there is nothing we can do about it exept not buy from them.

Now, I have read a fair few of you mention unscrupulous persons conning families out of their history, and about 'dealers' telling people to erase the details of the medals they are trying to sell.

These people are NOT collectors. For some reason us collectors seem to fall into the same group class of what I think is criminal and we are tarnished with that stigma. I don't understand why.

Cheers Andy. :(

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auchonvillerssomme

You missed out c. the private seller who might or might not know the value of medals - they can sell to collectors or to dealers. And lets face it not all collectors are angels despite the fact they may research, restore, remount and care for medals. I was once very very tempted to offer a laughable price for a group that truthfully would have demanded a high 4 figure sum at auction. The words give me 10 quid and they're yours will haunt me forever. :innocent:

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River97
You missed out c. the private seller who might or might not know the value of medals - they can sell to collectors or to dealers.

I actually don't buy that, and never have.

There is not one person on this planet who has seen a 2006 model Jaguar XJ6 with 24,000 on the clock, in the drive way for 500 dollars or pounds. People always research the value or get a valuation on their house before they sell it. So why is it somebody else's fault when they don't seem to do it when hocking the family medals?

Cheers Andy.

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welshdoc

Before some here start slagging all the dealers some are, as has been mentioned developing fantastic websites which are a researchers dream Northeast medals are a good example, and no Im not advertising nor have i any interest in the company.

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River97
Before some here start slagging all the dealers some are, as has been mentioned developing fantastic websites which are a researchers dream Northeast medals are a good example, and no Im not advertising nor have i any interest in the company.

I will agree with that, you want to know the difference between a genuine and a fake, have a look at their site. There are numerous I could list here.

Cheers Andy.

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KIRKY

What a mess!

John Langley deserves a medal!

Tony

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River97

Oh yes, I saw that on the BMF last night. I don't think John will have to buy a beer anywhere for quite a while.

Such a noble thing to do and now the medals are in a decent home, where they belong.

Cheers Andy.

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(nzef)

As much as I have tried to resist posting on this thread, you lot have got me as I think most of you are missing the point here.

There are two types of people who come in contact with medals:

<b>a.</b> Those who buy and sell for the monetary value and to make some sort of living from them, and

<b>b.</b> Those who purchase medals to restore, research, remount and care for the little pieces of metal.

Those who fall under a. are known as dealers and those who come under b. are known as collectors.

As a person who falls under category b. I am well aware that these are not black and white cases. Collectors sell medals to raise funds to improve on the theme they have chosen and there are also dealers who combine both category a. and b. and have some beautiful web sites. There are also dealers who blatantly over inflate the asking price for their medals in the hope that they will rope in someone new to the hobby. As much as I don't like it, there is nothing we can do about it exept not buy from them.

Now, I have read a fair few of you mention unscrupulous persons conning families out of their history, and about 'dealers' telling people to erase the details of the medals they are trying to sell.

These people are <b>NOT</b> collectors. For some reason us collectors seem to fall into the same group class of what I think is criminal and we are tarnished with that stigma. I don't understand why.

Cheers Andy. <img src="http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sad.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":(" border="0" alt="sad.gif" />

I also have been holding off on this thread, having discussed it at great length in other forums. I can't imporove on Andy's points above, other than to say that in my case it's a passion, an obsession if you will. I am just the current custodian...one day (but hopefully not soon) they will move on. Perhaps back to long lost family, perhaps not. In any case, the original recipients are never forgotten.

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Michael Johnson

I'm a collector. My experience is that many families just aren't interested, given the lack of response I've had on genealogy fora when I let people know I've got their ancestor's medal. I've had two cases where people who were interested have tracked the medal to me, and the medal has returned to the family.

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auchonvillerssomme

Multiply that story by a couple of hundred thousand and maybe it puts the selling of some medal 'heirlooms' from a couple of world wars into perspective.

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Tinhat47

I collect the men's stories who are connected to the medals. The little lumps of metal are tangible connections to these soldiers.

Today has been a good day. I've been able to find the 1914-15 Star to a man whose Victory medal I have. A rare chance to be able to reunite this man's medals. Maybe one day I'll find the other.

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HarryBettsMCDCM

......Sadly if the Young Lady starts another relationship in the future I suspect that the gesture will falter & the Medals will reappear sometime for sale,or worse be consigned to a dark drawer @ the back of the wardrobe....Or am I just too cynical???

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rockbabe

i would love to find my great uncles medals, i don't think its always as black and white as 'well someone in the family got rid of them so they were not wanted' yes i agree in some cases thats right but surely it can't be assumed that every medal that appears for sale is not wanted? obv thats just my opinion, i have nothing against proper collectors who collect for the right reasons.

Sadly in my case i will never know what happened and where the medals went. I am the first family member to trace our family tree. even my dad didn;t know that one of his uncles fought and was killed in WW1, and there are no other relatives who would know where they went.

I'd just like to think that if i ever tracked them down, the person owning them would allow me to purchase them at a fair price. i know my dad would love to see them.

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