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Where are they buried


Steve_McGarry
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Lord Frederick Sleigh Roberts (VC, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, PC, VD). Buried in a vault at St. Paul's Cathedral Crypt, City of London.

Died on 14 November 1914 at St. Omer, France.

Lee

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Try Findagrave.com

You can also submit grave locations and, if you wish, digital photographs of the grave.

A warning: it can be quite compulsive!

Gwyn :D

I've turned the above URL into a link. It's easy to put links in a message. Just click on the button that says http:/. It will then get you to key in the address, then what you want to appear in the text. Click on 'Close current tag' and you're away. Chris

Thank you, Chris. I suppose I assumed it would do it automatically! Gwyn

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Gough of the 5th Army died in 1963 (aged 92). Apparently interred at St Michael's Church at Camberley, Surrey.

In Middlesbrook's "Kaiser's Battle" a veteran recounts visiting the grave, it was overgrown with weeds and neglected.

I hope that this isn't the case now.

Jim

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I tried to find Gough's grave at Camberley from a dodgy sketch map provided by the vicar. I failed but had only limited timeto search. Has anyone elso found it ? The sound of rifle fire from various local army ranges sounds in the distance there. most appropriate.

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Brigadier General Sir John Gough V.C K.C.B C.M.G. A.D.C. to H.M. The King. Chief of Staff, First Army. Rifle Brigade. D.O.W 22nd February 1915. Buried Estaires Communal Cemetery. Interesting to note that the writing on his headstone is in much larger letters than normal for some reason. I can send anyone who is interested a scan, no idea how to put it on the forum though!

Ironic that the 5th Army Gough is buried near a rifle range. Looks like he's closer now to the firing than he ever was in WW1!!!!!!!!!

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Why would a general be in the frontline? Except to be killed for no reason?

Jan

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Field Marshall Edmund Ironside (Baron? of Archangel) is buried in the overflow cemetery in Hingham, Norfolk. His headstone looks to be a CWGC stone.

Gen Sir Chas. Townshend of Kut and Chitral Sieges fame or possibly notoriety is commemorated on the wall of the Townshend estate church in East Raynham, Norfolk. I expect he is buried outside but I was unable to find the grave.

After the War Edith Cavell was buried outside the eastern end of Norwich Cathedral.

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John Gough died as a result of wounds received, not because he had been drinking too much port or smoking too many big cigars. He was "close to the firing" all right, as were a very large number of Brigade and even Divisional Generals. I must say I did not find his gravestone to be anything but appropriate.

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Calm down Chris! My original posting stated Brigadier General John Gough Died of Wounds and I didn't suggest otherwise. I also didn't say his grave was not appropriate merely "interesting to note". However since you mention it his headstone is certainly not the same as those around him or ANY other I have ever seen. I would be interested to know if anyone knows of any others in France or Belgium with similar enarged lettering.

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Alan & Chris

I'm not sending this for any other reason than I happen to be researching a Major who died at Neuve Chapelle on 12th March 1915 and I have been looking at the War Record of the 2nd Btn. Rifle Brigade. I thought you would be interested to read the following:

18th February 1915

Enemy opened fire with a machine-gun from Trivalet, a thing they had not done for a long time.

Up to date seventy-eight men were hit by rifle fire, twenty-one being killed; of these six were hit out in front, twelve out behind and sixty on duty in the trenches.

20th February

Brigadier-General J.E. Gough, V.C., visited the Battalion, and was mortally wounded by a machine gun sniper at a range of 2,000 yards, while walking along the Rue Tilleloy.

22nd February

Battalion marched into Estaires for the funeral of Brigadier-General Gough. "A" Company (his old Company in South Africa) formed the firing party.

The Rue Tilleloi (as it is spelt on the map) ran parallel to the trenches behind the 2nd Bn. Rifle Brigade Assembly position.

Regards

Myrtle

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